Biloxi Electric Street Railway & Power Company

BILOXI ELECTRIC STREET RAILWAY

          Biloxi became ‘electrified’ with the formation of the Biloxi Electric Power Company in 1894.  It was chartered in the State of Mississippi on February 3, 1894 by a large contingent of Biloxi merchants, Coast seafood packers, and other prominent businessmen.  Among them were: Edward G. Burklin (1860-1920+), Ed Glennan (1854-1933), J.W. Swetman (1863-1937), J.J. Lemon (1825-1915), E.J. Buck, Lazaro Lopez (1850-1903), Walter A. White (1854-1942), Harry T. Howard (1856-1930), Charles F. Theobald (1839-1903), John C. Bradford (1855-1928), Sherwood Bradford (1857-1937), Lyman Bradford (1863-1944), George E. Theobald (1873-1921), Francis B. Dunbar (1846-1908), George H. Dunbar (1844-1917), W.T. Bolton (1859-1923), S.B. Mayers, Frank Voivedich (1860-1930), John Eistetter, Isidore Heidenheim, Manuel Perez, John Bousquet (18-1908), Vincent Voivedich (1850-1927), Charles Patton (1839-1922), Casimir Harvey (1846-1905), John Johnson, Peter Eskald (1856-1944), T.A. Cleary, T.B. Cleary, C.M. Amare, Frank T. Howard (1855-1911), Nicholas Voivedich (1850-1937), J.W. Elder, Charles Redding, A. Bousquet, Lizzie Bradford, and W.K.M. Dukate (1852-1916).  The first Board of Directors of the Biloxi Electric Power Company was composed of the following: Edward G. Burklin, Ed Glennan, J.J. Lemon, Lazaro Lopez, J.W. Swetman, E.J. Buck, and Walter A. White.(Harrison Co., Mississippi Chattel Deed Bk. 2, p. 116)

Edward G. Burklin

Edward G. Burklin (1860-1920+) was born at Vandalia, Missouri.  He came to Biloxi in the fall of 1892 with the purpose of building a flour mill and an electric light plant near the L&N Depot.  He had erected several flour mills in Missouri.(The Biloxi Herald, November 5, 1892, p. 4)

In April 1893, the Biloxi Milling Company, commenced operations making flour and meal.  It was founded by Missourians, Edward G. Burklin (1860-1920+), James B. 'Buck' Chinn (1857-1912), R.D. Chinn, and Mr. Brewton.  The mill was situated on the northeast corner of Magnolia Street immediately north of the L&N Railroad tracks.(The Biloxi Herald, January 7, 1893, p. 8 and April 22, 1893, p. 1)

January 1902

Incorporation

The Biloxi Electric Street Railway and Power Company was chartered in the State of Mississippi on  

July 1903

In early July, the Biloxi Electric Street Railway and Power Company contracted to acquire 300,000 bricks from the Biloxi Brick Company to erect their power house on Lameuse Street.  The brick company agreed to deliver 75,000 brick immediately with the remainder to arrive within thirty days.  The bricks cost $8 per one thousand.  It was anticipated that the power house construction would start in ten days.  Also at this time, six miles of trolley wire and the large steam domes of the big boilers arrived.(The Biloxi Daily Herald, July 3, 1903, p. 6)          

The City of Biloxi signed a new eighteen month contract with the Biloxi Electric Street Railway to furnish free city lights.(The Biloxi Daily Herald, July 8, 1903, p. 5)

Two more car loads of boiler fixtures for the power plant have arrived.(The Biloxi Daily Herald, July 8, 1903, p. 5)

September 1903

By early September crews were working feverishly on Point Cadet in east Biloxi.  Track was being laid on Oak Street from East Howard Avenue to the beach and grading was almost completed from Oak Street east to the Barataria Canning Company.  Archille Chiapella (1862-1936) who resided on the east side of Reynoir Street between Howard Avenue and the L&N Railroad was demanding the Biloxi Electric Street Railway Company place their tracks in the center of the street when it fronted his property.  Chiapella’s request was redundant as the company preferred to locate their tracks in the street’s center.  In addition, the street railway company had no control of where the tracks were placed on the street as the alderman of each ward in the city had this power.(The Biloxi Daily Herald, September 3, 1903, p. 6)

The stock holders of the Biloxi Electric Light Company sued the directors of the company for $4166.67, the pro rata, due to the holders of 25 shares of stock, from the Biloxi Electric Street Railway Power Company.(The Biloxi Daily Herald, September 4, 1903, p. 6)

The fountain situated at Lameuse Street and Howard Avenue had to be relocated to Lameuse Street and Front Street in order that the electric railway could pass unimpeded.  Martin Hass, the City Plumber, was in charge of the project.  Following the large conflagration of 1889, Harry T. Howard (1856-1930), philanthropist, donated an artesian well and fountain to the City at this location to provide a ready source of water for drinking and fire purposes.(The Biloxi Daily Herald, September 9, 1903, p. 6)

October 1903

          The work of grading Lameuse Street for the electric railroad from Howard Avenue from the Montross Hotel was commenced on October 13, 1903.  Contractor O’Beirne is building the transportation route.(The Biloxi Daily Herald, October 13, 1903, p. 8 and October 19, 1903, p. 8)

Route

          The Biloxi Electric Street Railway ran from the western corporate limits of Biloxi on Front Street, now West Beach Boulevard, to Porter Avenue.  Here the tracks turned north onto Porter and went to Howard Avenue where the line ran east along Howard Avenue to Oak Street.  The railway went south on Oak Street to Front Street and then east on Front Street to Cadet Street, near the Barataria Canning Company.  A spur also ran north from Howard Avenue on Oak Street to the L&N Railroad.  Another short route from Howard Avenue connected the Biloxi Electric Street Railway with Front Street from Lameuse Street.  The Back Bay section of Biloxi was reached by the line from Howard Avenue and Reynoir going north to Back Bay and then east to the factory of E.C. Joullian, which was on Back Bay near Main Street.(Harrison Co., Mississippi Land Deed Bk. 104, pp. 104-105)

Gulfport and Mississippi Coast Traction Company

 

Mississippi Power Company

          The Mississippi Power Company was organized in    .  It acquired the Gulfport and Mississippi Coast Traction Company on June December 31, 1924.  J.M. Barry, president and Frank N. Savage, assistant secretary.(Harrison Co., Mississippi Land Deed Bk. 151, p. 340)

          In March 1926, the Mississippi Power Company announced that a hydro-electric line paralleling the Coast would be included in its $70 million development plan.  The companies hydro-electric plants were situated on the Coosa and Tallapoosa Rivers in Alabama and a 110,000 volt line would be built from the Alabama-Mississippi state line to a step-down transformer station at Gulfport.  Permission had been granted to the company to construct power lines on the bridge across the Back Bay of Biloxi from D’Iberville.(The Biloxi News, March 28, 1926, p. 1)

 

REFERENCES:

The Biloxi Herald, “Electric Lights”, November 5, 1892.

The Biloxi Herald, “”, January 7, 1893, p. 8

The Biloxi Herald, “”, April 22, 1893, p. 1

The Biloxi Herald, “Lights for the town”, September 30, 1893.

The Biloxi Daily Herald, “City Council”, January 8, 1902.

The Biloxi Daily Herald, “Stock taken”, November 15, 1902.

TThe Biloxi Daily Herald, “The Charter”, December 18, 1902.

The Biloxi Daily Herald, “Electric Street Railway”, January 16, 1903.

The Biloxi Daily Herald, “Biloxi Electric Railway Company”, February 24, 1903.

The Biloxi Daily Herald, “Damage suit”, June 17, 1903.

The Biloxi Daily Herald, “Big Brick deal”, July 3, 1903.

The Biloxi Daily Herald, “Biloxi for Biloxians”, July 3, 1903.

The Biloxi Daily Herald, “Biloxi for Biloxians”, July 6, 1903.

The Biloxi Daily Herald, “City Fathers”, July 8, 1903.

The Biloxi Daily Herald, “Biloxi for Biloxians”, July 9, 1903.

The Biloxi Daily Herald, “The silver spike”, August 13, 1903.

The Biloxi Daily Herald, “City News”, September 3, 1903.

The Biloxi Daily Herald, “Want a receiver”, September 4, 1903.

The Biloxi Daily Herald, “Fountain to be moved”, September 9, 1903.

The Biloxi Daily Herald, “City Items”, October 13, 1903.

The Biloxi Daily Herald, “City Items”, October 19, 1903.

The Biloxi Daily Herald, “Let us have an electric line to Biloxi”, November 25, 1903.

The Biloxi Daily Herald, “The cars”, December 15, 1903.

The Biloxi Daily Herald, “Money makers”, March 25, 1904.

The Daily Herald, [E.G. Burklin] Wants to hear from Biloxi”, March 4, 1911.

The Daily Herald, “Biloxi promoter [E.G. Burklin] of 1893 writes”, October 4, 1919.

The Daily News, “Power line to Coast included in companies program”, March 28, 1926.

Newspapers

BILOXI NEWSPAPERS

 

The Biloxi Sentinel

The Daily Picayune, “”, August 23, 1853, p. 1

 

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1875

The Biloxi Mirror

The Biloxi Mirrorwas published as early as 1875, by the C.K. Browning & Company.(The Daily Herald 50th Golden Jubilee, 1934, p. 101)

           

REFERERNCES:

The Daily Herald 50th Golden Jubilee Number Biographical and Historical 1884-1934, (The Daily Herald: Gulfport-Biloxi, Mississippi-1934).

Twentieth Century Coast Edition of the Biloxi Daily Herald: Historical and Biographical(George W. Wilkes & Sons: Biloxi-1902).

 

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1884

The Biloxi Herald

George W. Wilkes (185-1915) founded The Biloxi Herald in 1884.  He was a native of

 

1891

The Biloxi Herald moved into its new office building adjacent to the Masonic Opera House on Pass Christian Street about April 15, 1891.  The structure was built by John R. Harkness and was central and desirable than their last quarters.(The Biloxi Herald, April 4, 1891, p. 4)

THE BILOXI HERALD

$2.00 Per Year

OFFICIAL JOURNAL OF HARRISON COUNTY.

OFFICIAL JOURNAL OF TOWN OF BILOXI.

OFFICIAL JOURNAL OF HARRISON CO. FARMERS’ ALLIANCE.

George W. Wilkes, Publisher

(T.H. Glenn, 1893, advertisement)

1896

Captain John H. Miller (1847-1928) assumed editorial control of The Biloxi Herald on October 31, 1896 from George W. Wilkes (1854-1915).  Captain Miller left the journal on May 1, 1898 when the co-partnership, G.W. Wilkes & Company, was dissolved leaving G.W. Wiles sole owner of The Biloxi Herald.(The Biloxi Herald, June 11, 1898, p. 1 and The Daily Herald, April 23, 1928, p. 2)

Captain John H. Miller

 

John Henry Miller (1847-1928) born December 14, 1847 at Paulding, Jasper County, Mississippi.  During the Civil War, he enlisted in ‘The Jasper Grays’, Company F of the 16th Mississippi Regiment serving three year as a Lieutenant Robert E.  Lee’s Army of Northern Virginia.  Returning from the conflict, he married Alice Sophie Miller (1852-1916) circa 1871, and they were childless. During and post-Reconstruction, J.H. Miller was a newspaper man. (The Biloxi Daily Herald, 1902, p. 52)

William F. Gray, editor.

 

 

 

Editor George P. Money

George Pierson Money (1867-1951), the elder brother of H.D. Money, was born in Hinds County, Mississippi.  Like his brother, George P. Money was a lawyer having studied for the bar examination in Carrollton, Mississippi.  In 1891, he was admitted to the bar there and practiced law for twenty-five years.  When his father was in the Senate, young Money resided in Washington D.C. and worked as a file clerk in the House of Representatives document room and was chief clerk in the folding room of the House of Representatives.  He also worked on a USGS survey team, which was mapping the region near the District of Columbia.(The Daily Herald, March 7, 1951, p. 1)           

George P. Money’s law experience was quite varied.  From 1893 to 1900, he worked as the assistant U.S. attorney for the Territory of New Mexico.  In November 1904, he ran unsuccessfully as a Democrat for the position of delegate to Congress from the New Mexico Territory.  In 1905, the G.P. Money family relocated to the Mississippi Gulf Coast.  He was the deputy clerk and U.S. commissioner at Biloxi from 1918 until 1949.(The Daily Herald, June 3, 1948, p. 6 and March 7, 1951, p. 1)               

At heart, George P. Money was a newspaperman.  His early experience was with The Chattanooga Evening News and The Greenwood Enterprise, where he co-published with Governor James K. Vardaman (1861-1930).  During WW I, Money became associated with The Daily Herald.  He was with this journal for thirty-two years and was its longtime editor.(ibid.)

 

THE BILOXI DAILY HERALD

1902

H.S. Evans, editor and E.H. Benedict, manager of the Herald Printery.

 

REFERENCES:

 

The Biloxi Daily Herald, Business and Professional Men, (The Biloxi Daily Herald: Biloxi, Mississippi-1902), p. .

The Daily Herald 50th Golden Jubilee Number Biographical and Historical 1884-1934, (The Daily Herald: Gulfport-Biloxi, Mississippi-1934).

Charles L. Dyer, Along The Gulf, (Women of the Trinity Episcopal Church:  Pass Christian-1971.  Originally published in 1895).

T.H. Glenn, The Mexican Gulf Coast on Mobile Bay & Mississippi Sound Illustrated, (Graham-Delchamps: Mobile, Alabama-1893).

Journals

The Biloxi Herald, “Removal”, April 4, 1891.

The Biloxi Herald, “A statement”, December 12, 1896.

The Biloxi Daily Herald, “Captain J.H. Miller acquitted”, July 10, 1897.

The Biloxi Daily Herald, “Result of unfortunate newspaper controversy”, July 10, 1897.

The Biloxi Daily Herald, “Unwarranted insinuation”, November 21, 1896.

The Biloxi Daily Herald, “Recorder’s Court”, December 12, 1896.

The Biloxi Daily Herald, “A statement”, December 12, 1896.

The Biloxi Daily Herald, “Not Guilty”, July 3, 1897.

 

The Biloxi Daily Herald, “Captain J.H. Miller acquitted”, July 10, 1897.

The Biloxi Daily Herald, “City News”, March 3, 1903.

The Daily Herald, “George Washington Wilkes”, March 30, 1915.

The Daily Herald, “Funeral of G. W. Wilkes conducted from late Howard Avenue residence”, March 30, 1915.

The  Daily Herald, “Tribute to memory of  G. W. Wilkes by editor of “The Coast Advertiser”, March 30, 1915.

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1893

The Biloxi Blizzard

Louis Rosenthal (1851-1942), an 1853 Prussian immigrant, commenced The Biloxi Blizzard in February 1893.  From comments about his newspaper, it appears that it’s early months were difficult and there were times when The Biloxi Blizzard was not published.  The Biloxi Herald, a competitor, wrote in April 1894, that “after a suspension of several months, The Biloxi Blizzard made an appearance on April 1st.  L. Rosenthal appears on the masthead as editor and proprietor

The Biloxi Blizzard advertised in 1893 as follows:

 

THE BLIZZARD

Published every Wednesday by the Biloxi Publishing Company

Louis Rosenthal, Editor and Manager

Subscription $1.50 per year

(T.H. Glenn, 1893, advertisement)

 

Family

Louis Rosenthal married Brunette Levy (1868-1956) at New Orleans on February 19, 1888.  They were the parents of seven children and six sons survived to adulthood: Seligman T. Rosenthal (1889-1973); Leon Rosenthal (1890-1920+) m. Fannie Heymann; Aaron Rosenthal (1893-1917+); Jacob Rosenthal (1895-1972); Marcus Rosenthal (1902-1970); and Ezra Rosenthal (1904-1994)

 

The Mandeville Wave

The Rosenthal family left Biloxi for Mandeville, Louisiana before 1900.  Here Louis found employment with The Mandeville Wave, a small journal, as a journalist.

 

REFERENCES:

 

Charles L. Dyer, Along The Gulf, (Women of the Trinity Episcopal Church:  Pass Christian-1971.  Originally published in 1895).

 

T.H. Glenn, The Mexican Gulf Coast on Mobile Bay & Mississippi Sound Illustrated, (Graham-Delchamps: Mobile, Alabama-1893).

The Biloxi Herald, “Local Happenings”, February 4, 1893.

The Biloxi Herald, “Local Happenings”, April 7, 1894.

The Biloxi Herald, “Local Happenings”, May 25, 1895.

The Biloxi Herald, “Local Happenings”

The Biloxi Daily Herald, “City News”, March 3, 1903.

 

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1895

The Biloxi Banner

The Biloxi Banner was founded by W.E. Champlin on March 16, 1895.  Mr. Champlin was born

 

W.E. Champlin married Rosa A. Leger in November 1891.

 

 

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1896

The Biloxi Review

The Biloxi Reviewpublished it first weekly newspaper on July 25, 1896.  It was commenced by H.S. Evans.

 

H.S. Evans

H.S. Evans had relocated to Gulfport by August 1897 and had taken the reins of The Gulfport Southward.  It had shown improvement under his managing skills.(The Biloxi Daily Herald, August 7, 1897 p. 1)

 

Joseph D. McKie

Joseph D. McKie (1858-1907) bought the Biloxi Review circa 1906.  He was born in Tennessee.  J.D. McKie and family arrived at Biloxi circa 1895, probably from Birmingham, Alabama.  He had married Lura McKie (1859-1919+), also a Tennessee native, who bore him two daughters, Laura J. ‘Nita’ McKie, Mississippi native, and Ernestine McKie (1881-1919), born Alabama.  Before his career as a publisher, J.D. McKie had been a druggist and have practiced his trade at New Orleans and Birmingham.(The Biloxi Daily Herald, November 5, 1907, p. 2)

Biloxi

At Biloxi, the McKie family was domiciled at 627 East Howard Avenue on the corner of Keller Avenue.  The Biloxi Review was moved to Gulfport and called the Gulfport Review.  The McKie women were quite industrious as Lura McKie worked as a reporter; Nita McKie was a stenographer for a naval stores company; and Ernestine McKie kept books.(1910 Harrison Co., Mississippi Federal Census T624_740, p. 9A, ED 33)

Demise

Joseph D. McKie expired at Biloxi, Mississippi in early November 1907.  He was a personal friend of James K. Vardaman (1861-1930), Mississippi governor from 1904 to 1908.  The body of J.D. McKie was interred in the Biloxi Cemetery.  When a Woodmen of the World monument was placed on J.D. McKie’s grave in late February 1908, former Governor Vardaman gave a speech.(The Biloxi Daily Herald, February 29, 1908, p. 4)

Nita McKie developed an illness, possibly tuberculosis, which resulted in the family relocating to Del Rio, Texas.  Lura McKie sold the family home to Joseph Comber, Biloxi merchant, for $2600 in December 1912.  Nita died at Del Rio, Texas in December 1919.  Her corporal remains were sent to Biloxi for burial near her father.(The Daily Herald, December7, 1912, p. 4 and February 4, 1919, p. 3)           

 

REFERENCES:

Twentieth Century Coast Edition of the Biloxi Daily Herald: Historical and Biographical(George W. Wilkes & Sons: Biloxi-1902), see page 48.

The Biloxi Herald,“City News”, August 1, 1896.

The Biloxi Herald,“Biloxi Review and Ocean Wave”, October 24, 1896.

The Biloxi Herald, “A heavy suit for libel”, September 12, 1896.

The Biloxi Herald,“An open letter”, September 26, 1896.[W.F. Gray, editor’s reply to Sivad [Davis] of the OS Wave]

The Biloxi Daily Herald, “Necrology”, November 5, 1907.

The Biloxi Daily Herald, “City News”, February 29, 1908.

The Daily Herald, “Several sales of Biloxi property”, December 7, 1912.

The Daily Herald, “Miss Nita McKie dead”, February 4, 1919.

 

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1939

The Gulf Coast Examiner

The Gulf Coast Examiner, a weekly journal "dedicated to Good Government" and published by the Gulf Coast Publishing Company and located at Lameuse and Washington Streets, published its first issue on June 15th.  E.J. Hosch, formerly assistant publicity director at Mississippi State College was editor and publisher.  Edward Brumfield, formerly of the Mississippi Guide, was advertising manager and superintendent of the mechanical engineering department. Other employees were: Virgil England, fomerly with the Miami, Oklahoma Daily News Record; Samuel Wells; Clyde Campbell; and Mrs. E.J. Hosch.(The Daily Herald, June 15, 1939, p. 3)

 

REFERENCES:    

The Daily Herald, ‘New weekly to be published at Biloxi’, June 15, 1939, p. 3)