Interesting Things

By Ray L. Bellande

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Three Hundred Years of Biloxi Art and Mary Ethel Dismukes (1870 - 1952)

THREE HUNDRED YEARS of BILOXI ART

 

Native American-crude coiled pots with some scriffito.

 

Colonial Biloxi-

 

Early French cartography-Maps of Biloxi Bay and environs.

 

Jean-Baptiste Michel Le Bouteux, “View of the Camp of the Concession of Monseigneur Law at Nouveau Biloxy, coast of Louisiana”, 1720.(The Newberry Library, Chicago, Illinois)

 

Gauld’s Map of 1768.  In June 1768, George A. Gauld (1732-1782), a Scottish cartographer and surveyor, in the employ of the British Admiralty, made a map of coastal Mississippi.  He was operating from HMS Sir Edward Hawke.  During his reconnaissance and charting of the region, Gauld made many observations about Horn Island.  He discovered that it was some sixteen miles in length, but in width no more than one mile.  Orientation was nearly east-west.  As regards to vegetation, Gauld noted that there were uneven groves of trees on the west end of the island.  The middle was characterized by dense growth, and the eastern end of the sand bar was fairly devoid of tree growth.(Ware, 1982, p.107) 

 

U.S. Map Survey of 1851

 

Richard Clague Jr. (1821-1873)-The Back Bay of Biloxi, 1862-a drawing and finished oil painting.

 

Mississippi Gulf Coast Art Association-founded in November 1926.

 

MGCAA

William Woodward (1859-1939), formerly of New Orleans, was the founder of the Mississippi Gulf Coast Art Association during his retirement years at Biloxi.  Professor Woodward had relocated to Benachi Avenue at Biloxi in 1923.  He had relocated from New England to the Crescent City with Ellsworth Woodward, his brother, to teach art at the World Business and Cotton Centennial held in 1884 and 1885.

In mid-November 1926, he and interested parties met at the Biloxi Public Library and commenced this cultural body, which aspired to influence the future aesthetics of the Mississippi Gulf Coast.  Among the charter members of the organization were: Mary Ethel Dismukes (1870-1952) and Louise Mallard (1900-1975) of Biloxi; Miss Sarah K. Smith (1878-1930+) of Gulf Park College; Dean Parkhurst Woleben (1891-1968) of Gulfport; and Ella Layden Roche, Edward C. de Celle, and Roderick Dempster MacKenzie (1865-1941) of Mobile.(The Daily Herald, November 19, 1926, p. 2)

The Mississippi Gulf Coast Art Association held its first annual exhibit at the Biloxi Public Library from February 4th until February 20th, 1927, Miss Ethel Dismukes (1870-1952), then secretary of the organization, exhibited photography and oil paintings.  Her “The Burden Bearer” was voted “the best-liked picture”.  William Woodward won the gold medal for “Our Street”.(The Daily Herald, February 3, 1927, p. 2 and February 21, 1927, p. 2)

 

1927 Gulf Coast Art Association Exhibit

The Gulf Coast Art Association, which was led by Professor William Woodward (1859-1939) and Mary Ethel Dismukes (1870-1952), held its first exhibit at the Biloxi Public Library from February 4th until February 20th, 1927.  The show, which was composed of oil paintings, water colors, pastels, lithographic drawings, block prints, sculpture, photography, pottery, metal work, and embroidery, was juried by Will H. Stevens of Newcomb College at New Orleans, Sarah K. Smith of Gulf Park College at Gulfport, Mississippi, and Edmund C. DeCelle of Mobile.(The Daily Herald, February 3, 1927, p. 2)

Those exhibiting at the Biloxi show were: Peter Anderson (1901-1984)-Ocean Springs; Gertrude Burton (Ocean Springs); Grace Cheeseman (Gulfport); Alethia B. Clemens (Biloxi); Edmund C. DeCelle (Mobile); Mary Ethel Dismukes (1870-1952)-Biloxi; Camille J. Ehrenfels (NOLA); Robert H. Holmes (1869-1949)-Ocean Springs; Dorothy Hopkins (Biloxi); Charles W. Hutson (Biloxi); Charles E. Hultberg (1874-1948)- (Biloxi); Manuel Jalanivich (1898-1944)-Biloxi/California; Louise Mallard (1900-1975)-Biloxi); William H. Muir (Gulfport); Anne Wells Munger (Pass Christian); Christine Northrop (Pass Christian); Mrs. Granville Osoinach (Gulfport); Sarah K. Smith (Gulfport); Miss C.R. Tibb (Biloxi); Clara Tucker (Biloxi); Alice Walsh (Gulfport); Louise Giesen Woodward (1862-1937)-Biloxi; and William Woodward (1859-1939)-Biloxi.(The Daily Herald, February 5, 1927, p. 5)

On opening night of the juried exhibition, the winning artists selected by the three jurors were as follows: Gold Medal sponsored by The Peoples Bank for the best oil painting, “A Western Scene”, by Charles E. Hultberg (1874-1948); Gold Medal given by the Biloxi City Commissioners for the best Mississippi coast scene, “Our Street”;byWilliam Woodward;and Ribbon for honorable mention was won by Edmund C. DeCille for “Mardi Gras”. (The Daily Herald, February 5, 1927, p. 5)

On February 8, 1927, three pieces of Jalan Pottery for the Biloxi exhibit arrived from California.  They consisted of a large jardinière worth $150.00, and two pieces, a light blue bowl and a small jar, valued at $20.00 apiece.  Manuel Jalanivich’s  work was lauded for its form, color, and glazing.  The ceramic work of Peter Anderson of the Shearwater Pottery at Ocean Springs was also praised.(The Daily Herald, February 9, 1927, p. 2)

The final award for the first Gulf Coast Art Association Exhibit was given by The First National Bank on the basis of votes placed by visitors to the show.  The Gold Medal for the “most popular picture” was won by Miss Mary Ethel Dismukes for The Burden Bearer”.  Professor Woodward’s large oil painting of potters, Joseph Meyer and George Ohr, placed second.  Miss Dismukes photograph titled “Sunshine and Shadow” was third in popularity.(The Daily Herald, February 21, 1927, p. 2)

 

1927-Gulf Coast Art Association

This show was juried by Will H. Stevens (1881-1949) of Newcomb College; Miss Sarah K. Smith of Gulf Park College; and Edmund C. de Celle of Mobile.  Professor Woodward had a least two paintings in this initial exhibit of the MGCAA, ‘The New Orleans Art Pottery Company” and ‘Our Street’, which was awarded the gold medal for best Coast scene.(The Daily Herald, February 3, 1927, p. 2 and February 21, 1927, p. 2)

In April 1927, the Woodwards ventured to Charleston, South Carolina to attend the Southern States Art League annual convention.  While in the Low Country, Professor Woodward painted the renowned Azalea blossoms of Magnolia Plantation and Gardens and visited the Terrace Azalea Gardens.  At Easter, they visited with Eleanor W. Blosser and grandchildren in Atlanta.  At Mobile, the Woodwards visited the Gulf Coast Art Association show and returned it to Biloxi.(The Daily Herald, April 21, 1927, p. 2)

1928 Exhibits

At an exhibition of her works sponsored by the Woman’s Club and held at the Biloxi Public Library from February 23 to February 27, 1928, Miss Dismukes displayed an eclectic ensemble of approximately eighty art objects-over forty photographs, eighteen oil paintings, four watercolors, two pastels and craft work in china, copper, and wood.  In addition, she delivered two lectures, History and Legends of the Gulf Coast and the Vieux Carre.  By popular vote, visitors to her exhibition selected “Rosy Dawn” and “Reflections” as the best in her show.  Miss Dismukes sold several pieces and received solicitations for portraits.(The Daily Herald, February 22, 1928, p. 2, February 23, 1928, p. 2, February 25, 1928, p. 2, and February 27, 1928, p. 2)          

1928-Mississippi Gulf Coast Art Association-

Mid-February 1928 was indeed a historic moment in the art history of Biloxi.  There were two exhibits on simultaneously.  Professor William Woodward had his own gallery showing while the MGCAA show was hanging in the Biloxi Public Library.  The Woodward display consisted of about forty paintings, primarily of Biloxi.  Some of his subjects were: Benachi Avenue at its Back Bay terminus; the Biloxi lighthouse; live oaks in front of the W.P. Kennedy domicile; shell roads in the vicinity of Solari’s fish house; and the elliptical shoreline of the Back Bay of Biloxi.  An art critic from New York City so admired the color and composition of William Woodward’s ‘Spring time near Biloxi’, that he compared the Professor to Claude Monet (1840-1926).  Mr. Woodward related that after he had moved beyond the Barbizon style that indeed Monet had been an inspiration.(The Daily Herald, February 16, 1928, p. 2)

Professor William Woodward opened the 1929 art association annual exhibition with a talk on art appreciation.  He emphasized that art, excepting religion, is the most tangible element in our daily lives.  Woodward lauded the Mississippi Gulf Coast Art Association for its inaugural efforts and selfless serving to promote cultural activities in this historic region.  He emphasized that there were limitless, natural subjects to be captured on the canvas by local artists for as Professor Woodward stated, “art begins at home.”  William Woodward was honored at this art show by capturing the Peoples Bank award for the best oil painting for his “Azaleas in Sunlight”.(The Daily Herald, February 18, 1928, p. 2)

 

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Pass Christian

The Mississippi Gulf Coast Art Association 2nd annual art show opened at Pass Christian on March 1, 1928.  The Rafferty building was selected as the viewing venue at the Pass.  This show will move to Mobile at a later date.(The Daily Herald,  March 1, 1928, p. 2)

 

1929 Exhibits

In mid-January 1929,the Biloxi Public Library was the venue of an art exhibit of the professional women artists of Mississippi.  Among those showing their water colors, pastels, and oil paintings were: Mrs. W.Q. Sharp of Jackson, vice president of the Mississippi Art Association and worker in pastels and water color; Miss Mary Clair Sherwood, teacher at All Saints College at Vicksburg; Miss Charlotte E. Tibbs of Biloxi; Miss Betty McArthur, a teacher at M.S.C.W; Marie A. Hull (1890-1980) of Jackson who recently had three works accepted by the Philadelphia Watercolor Association and others at the Chicago Art Institute; Miss Mary Ethel Dismukes is exhibiting "Lover's Lane, Ocean Springs", "The Waifs", and "Spring", which was sketched at City Park in NOLA; Adolyn Gale Dismukes, Mrs. George Dismukes, was showing "Mt. Mckinley, Alaska", "Auroral Lights", and "Valley of Ten Thousand Smokes"; Mrs. Anne Wells Mounger of Pass Christian and Miss Sarah K. Smith of Gulf Park College also sent paintings.  A $20 prize for the most popular painting in the exhibit was sponsored by the First National Bank.(The Daily Herald, January 14, 1929, p. 2)

When the Coast Zone of Woman’s Clubs meeting was held in the Biloxi Public Library on October 31, 1929, an exhibit of Miss Dismukes photographs were on display in the clubroom.  The images were of local scenery appropriate for the occasion.(The Jackson County Times, November 9, 1929, p. 3)

 

1930

 

1931

 

1932

Miss Dismukes’ October exhibit

In late October 1932, Miss Dismukes replaced her former “sidewalk” display of oil paintings and photographs in a store window on West Howard Avenue in Biloxi, with a new showing of her work.  This photographic display dealt primarily with the Jefferson Davis family of Beauvoir.  Some of these images were: the Beauvoir pavilion where Jefferson Davis (1808-2008) wrote The Rise and Fall of the Confederacy, Winnie;s piano; the Davis trunk; and the Episcopal Church of the Redeemer.(The Daily Herald, October 31, 1932, p. 2)

 

Gulf CoastArt Association

The initial 1932 convening of the Gulf Coast Art Association occurred on January 18th at Gulf Park College.  Dean Babcock (1888-1969), a resident of Estes Park, Colorado wintering at Biloxi, was the guest speaker and Henry C. Barrow (1895-1945), staff artist for The Times Picayune, displayed his pencil drawings of New Orleans’ scenery.  Dean Babcock spoke of the history of wood cut prints, which had its origins in Japan.  Mr. Babcock’s own work in block prints was an amalgamation of the later European method and that of the Japanese.  His works on display were used to illustrate the principles in creating wood block prints.  Barrow had made prints of pine and oak trees since arriving at Biloxi.(The Daily Herald, January 20, 1932, p. 5)

 

Newcomb exhibit

In September 1932, William Woodward, president of the Gulf Coast Art Association, had an exhibit of his Vieux Carre oil paintings in the recently refurbished Newcomb College gallery.  These turn of the Century works featured such French Quarter landmarks as: the Cabildo, St. Louis Cathedral; the old French Opera House; and the signature Jackson Square.  Most of these works had been viewed by Gulf Coast art aficionados either at local exhibits or in Professor Woodward’s Oak Park studio.(The Daily Herald, September 20, 1932, p. 2)

 

‘New’ etchings process

The first fall meeting of 1932 was held in late November at the home of Deaconess Mary Truesdell at 138 Fayard Street in Biloxi.  Professor William Woodward delivered an address titled, ‘New Etching Processes”.  In recent months, he had been working diligently on an exhibit in this medium.(The Daily Herald, November 24, 1932, p. 2

The sixth annual Gulf Coast Art Association fall exhibit was non-juried.  William Woodward presented an oil portrait and several etchings.  The ‘Solari Memorial Plate’, an etching of the Philip L. Solari (1868-1932) oyster house, wharf, and tree was very popular.  For each Solari print sold, Professor Woodward donated one to a Biloxi school.  Philip L. Solari, an Italian immigrant and Biloxi merchant, and his oak tree both expired in 1932.  Ellsworth Woodward, his brother, made the Solari prints at New Orleans.  ‘Deacon Reed’s House’, also an etching by William Woodward, was made from a sketch of this Massachusetts home, work shop, well and sweep.(The Daily Herald, September 26, 1932, p. 2 and December 12, 1932, p. 2)

 

The Art Center

In early December 1932, artists of the Mississippi Gulf Coast Art Association decided to commence an “Art Center” in Biloxi.  It was located on the north side of West Howard Avenue between Reynoir and Fayard Streets, adjacent to D’Aquin’s Drugstore.  The “Art Center” may have been the first artist public meeting place and artist co-op on the Mississippi Gulf Coast.  In addition to rotating art exhibits and association meetings, the Gulf Coast Art Association planned to have a workroom in their building, with north light, which is considered excellent for drawing and painting.  Classes and workshops were also planned for the workroom.  The “Art Center” opened in late December 1932.  Professor Woodward, William ‘Billy’ Logan, his grandson, and Charlotte E. Tibbs of Biloxi worked diligently to bring this project to fruition.(The Daily Herald, December 6, 1932, p. 2, December 29, 1932, p. 2, and January 10, 1933, p. 6)

William Woodward resigned from his very active role as president of the Mississippi Gulf Coast Art Association in January 1933.  He had led the organization since its inception.  Anne Wells Munger (1862-1945), a native of Springfield, Massachusetts and resident of Pass Christian, Mississippi, became acting president.  Mrs. Munger wintered at Pass Christian and enjoyed painting during the cooler summers on Cape Cod in Massachusetts(The Daily Herald, February 14, 1927, p. 2 and January 10, 1933, p. 6)

 

1933

February found the MGCAA holding a showing of etchings at the Art Center.  Designated a ‘loan exhibit” because some individuals from the MGCAA loaned pieces from their private collections for the viewing pleasure of the membership as well as the public.  Anne Wells Munger of Pass Christian and Cape Cod, Massachusetts  (The Daily Herald, February 15, 1933, p. 2)

Anne Wells Munger of Pass Christian, Mississippi was elected president of the MGCAA at its annual meeting held in the Art Center on March 13, 1933.  Professor Woodward whose motivation and leadership had guided the MGCAA since its inception in November 1926, was named president emeritus.  Other elected officers were: Emma Langdon Roche, vice president; Mary Ethel Dismukes, secretary; and Deaconess Truesdell, treasurer.(The Daily Herald, March 14, 1933, p. 2)

The 1933 GCAA juried art show was held March 20-March 25 at the art studio on the Gulf Park College campus in Long Beach, Mississippi.-‘Autumn” and “Naval Reserve Park”-oils; “Captain Wooster’s Carpenter Place”, “Boats at Provincetown”, “Buck Sawyer”, and a “Coat of Arms”-etchings.(The Daily Herald, March 21, 1933, p. 1)

The Art Center at 512 West Howard Avenue officially closed its winter season in early May with a public tea.  William Woodward, president emeritus, was present at this function.  The Art Center closed for the summer months.(The Daily Herald, May 2, 1933, p. 2)

 

1934

Dorothy Hopkins left for Chicago on June 25th to spend the remainder of the summer studying at the American Academy of Art.  She is becoming Biloxi's best known artist.  Miss Hopkins has studied at NOLA and has had many exhibitions. She recently completed a portrait of Judge White and other works under the PWA.(The Daily Herald, June 25, 1934, p. 5)

 

1935

 

1935-Art Colony

From June 22 to August 17, 1935, an “art colony’ was held at the White House Hotel on Biloxi’s West Beach.  Hans Wang (1907-1942+), a native of New Orleans whose parents were Norwegian immigrants, ran the art school.  Mr. Wang resided at 4714 St. Peter Street in the Crescent City.(The Daily Herald, January 28, 1935, p. 3 and March 25, 1935, p. 5)

 

Chairman Biloxi’s presidential ball

In January 1936, Mayor John A.W. O’Keefe (1891-1985), appointed Miss Mallard chairman of Biloxi President’s Ball Committee.  The President’s Ball was held on January 30th in honor of the natal anniversary of President Franklin D. Roosevelt.  Funds raised from these dances were for the benefit of those disabled with infantile paralysis.  The proceeds were utilized for research, acquisition of hospital equipment, and to pay for treatment of those crippled with this malady.  In 1935, the President’s Ball raised more than $1 million dollars of which 30 per cent went to the Warm Springs, Georgia Foundation.(The Daily Herald,  January 13, 1936, p. 2)

 

1938

 

MGCAA

The Gulf Coast Art Association meeting for January 1938 had a change in venue.  The Markham Hotel at Gulfport, Mississippi was selected for the January 17, 1938 art show.  George Wilkinson, manager of the hotel, allowed the association the use of the mezzanine for their exhibits and the Gold Room for their lecture program.(The Daily Herald, January 11, 1938, p. 5)

Anthony V. ‘Tony Ragusin (1902-1997) of the Biloxi Chamber of Commerce entered twenty-six images in the Mississippi Art Association exhibition in early April.  Tony’s photographs depicted the fishing industry, fishing, birds, and bridges of the Mississippi Gulf Coast.(The Daily Herald,  March 31, 1938, p. 6)

 

1941

The Biloxi Camera Club was organized in September 1941 with Mary Ethel Dismukes (1870-1952) as its first president.(The Daily Herald, September 19, 1941, p. 7) 

 

1943

The art work of Sergeant Harry Dix (1907-1968) of New York City and stationed at Keesler Field, and Tech. Sergeant Manuel Bromberg (b. 1917) formerly at Keesler Field, was to be displayed in the London National Gallery.  Dix's works chosen for the exhibit were: 'Barracks Scenes' and 'PX at Night',while Bromberg;s 'Card Players and 'Tent Interiors' was going to London.  Captain Peter de Anna of Washington may also have his art work in the final selection.(The Daily Herald, October 20, 1943, p. 2) 

Private Birney Quick (1912-1981) of Duluth, Minnesota was selcted to paint murals at Keesler Field.(The Daily Herald, November 5, 1943, p. 2)

 

1948

Charles E. Hultberg (1874-1948), native of Sweden and retired from American Can Company and resident of Biloxi since 1922, died at his Porter Avenue residence.  Mr. Hultberg won the People’s Bank gold medal award for the best oil painting at the 1st GCAA in 1927.(The Daily Herald, February 5, 1927, p. 5 and November 20, 1948, p. 6)

 

1951

William Steene of Gulf Hills and Horace C. Russ of Lakeshore were jurors for the GCAA show held at the Markham Hotel’s Marine room in November.(The Gulf Coast Times, November 8, 1951, p. 1)

 

REFERENCES:

The Daily Herald, “Organize Art Association”, November 19, 1926.

The Daily Herald, “Artist are Biloxi visitors”, November 19, 1926.

The Daily Herald, “Gulf Coast Association”, November 30, 1926.

The Daily Herald, “Opening of Art Exhibit at Library”, February 3, 1927.

The Daily Herald, “Award Made by Jury of Gifted and Competent Artists for Gulf Coast Art Association Exhibition at Biloxi February 4”, February 5, 1927.

The Daily Herald, “Art Exhibits Closes Saturday”, February 14, 1927.

The Daily Herald, “Art Exhibits Closes”, February 21, 1927.

1928

The Daily Herald, "Joseph Meyer Lived In Biloxi", January 4, 1928, p. 10.

The Daily Herald, “Woodward Home”, February 15, 1928.

The Daily Herald, “Two art exhibitions”, February 16, 1928.

The Daily Herald, “Second annual art exhibition”, February 18, 1928.

The Daily Herald, “Art Exhibit opens at Pass [Christian], March 1, 1928.

The Daily Herald, “Biloxi News Paragraphs”, July 23, 1928.

1929-1936

The Daily Herald,“Etching exhibit at Art Center, October 31, 1932.

The Daily Herald, “Biloxi News Paragraphs [Dorothy Hopkins], June 25, 1934.

The Daily Herald, Etching exhibit at Art Center”, February 15, 1935.

The Daily Herald, “Summer Art Colony in Biloxi assured”, January 28, 1935.

The Daily Herald, “Annual art show opens”, April 9, 1935.

The Daily Herald, “Summer Art Colony”, March 25, 1935.

1937

The Daily Herald, “Test need for Museum in Biloxi”, January 18, 1937, p. 2.

The Daily Herald, “Museum supporters to meet”, February 24, 1937, p. 2.

The Daily Herald, “Community Art  Center to be discussed”, February 27, 1937, p. 5.

The Daily Herald, “Museum supporters to meet”, March 13, 1937, p. 10.

1938

The Daily Herald, “Ragusin enters pictures”, March 31, 1938.

1941

The Daily Herald, "Biloxi Camera Club organized", September 19, 1941. 

1943

The Daily Herald, "Keesler painting will be displayed in London Gallery", October 20, 1943 

The Daily Herald, "Artist to paint murals at Keesler Field", November 5, 1943.

1948

The Daily Herald, “Charles E. Hultberg dies”, November 20, 1948, p. 6.

1951

The Gulf Coast Times, “William Steene honored by Art Association”, November 8, 1951, p. 1.

1959

The Daily Herald, "[MacMahon] Gibbs outlines place of art in everyday life", July 23, 1959, p. 18.

BILOXI ARTISTS

SARAH K. SMITH

Sarah K. Smith was born at Oakland, Alameda County, California in June 1878 to Reverend George H. Smith (1847-1920+) and Rachel Moorer Smith (1856-1920+).

 

REFERENCES:

The Daily Herald,“Gulf Park again displays wisdom”, May 27, 1921, p. 8.

The Daily Herald,“Gulf Park College deserves to rank with strongest of Girls’ Schools”, August 1, 1921, p. 2.

The Daily Herald,“Woman’s Club at Gulf Park College”, November 23, 1922, p. 5.

The Daily Herald,“Detail of rotary art exhibit”, November 23, 1922, p. 5.

 

CHARLOTTE  E. TIBBS

Charlotte E. Tibbs (1878-1971?) was born at New York.  Lived on Iberville Drive in Biloxi.

 

ALETHIA B. CLEMENS

Alethia Beatrice Clemens (1874-1960) was born September 6, 1874 to Bruno Richard Clemens (1830-1915) and Emma P. Savers (1843-1930).  Her father was born at Hanover, Germany and was a ship pilot, Condederate war veteran, and former yacht racer for wealthy New Orleanians.  Mrs. Clemens was born in Alabama.  Bruno and Emma married in Harrison County, Mississippi in February 1860 and had five children: Emma Josephine Clemons (1861-1892) m. Albert Gerdes (1853-1917); Mary Alice Clemons(1863-1931); Edward Clemons (1866-1942); Noalee Clemons (1872-1936) m. Charles H. Delmas (1855-1938); and Alethia B. Clemens (1874-1960).

Education

Attended Sophie Newcomb College at New Orleans where she studied the normal art course from 1906 until her graduation in 1910.  Alethia B. Clemens expired at Biloxi, Mississippi on January 13, 1960.

REFERENCES:

The Daily Herald, “Miss Clemens returns to Alexandria”, September 14, 1915.

 

LOUISE J. MALLARD

Louise Josephine Mallard (1900-1975) was born March 22, 1900, at New Orleans, Louisiana, the daughter of George F. Mallard (1854-1926) and Julia Rousseau (1875-1947).  Her parents married at New Orleans on June 14, 1893.  Children: George F. Mallard II (1894-1916); Prudent Mallard (1895-1918); Julia Maria Mallard (1897-1899); Louise Mallard (1900-1975); and Albert Mallard (1901-1982) m. Evelyn McShane (1902-1960).

 

1928 Mardi Gras

Louise designed Mardi Gras floats using a Japanese influence.

 

Pilot Club

            

 

Louise Mallard anecdotal stories

Louise hired a plumber to fix a leak in her house.  Waited and didn’t show.  Came late and knocked on the screen door and invited him.  She had called down from upstairs where she sat on the commode with a umbrella in her hand above the leaking pipe!  This was her method for emphasis the leak to the plumber.(Maria Mallard, June 27, 2008)

Louise got tired of the canopy on her Mallard bed and cut the four posts to remove it.(Maria Mallard, June 27, 2008)

In the 1940s, Alton Bellande (1912-1970), a young Biloxi Fuller Brush salesman, went to the Mallard home on Benachi Avenue to make a potential sales call.  Louise welcomed him into her home, as their families knew one another.  Alton observed dust coating much of the Mallard furniture and floors and anticipated making at least a brush sale.  Miss Mallard was taken aback at his suggestion that her house was in need of a thorough cleaning.  Bellande departed frustrated and scolded Louise with this comment: “Louise, you need more than brushes to clean this place.  You need a large broom!”(Betty Bellande-Toland, June 28, 2008)

Expired January 28, 1975.

REFERENCES:

The Daily Herald, “photo”, February 21, 1928, p. 1.

The Daily Herald, Miss Mallard awarded cup”, May 1, 1935, p. 2.

The Daily Herald, , “Chairman Biloxi Presidential Ball”, January 13, 1936.

The Daily Herald, “photo”, June 7, 1936, p. 5.

The Daily Herald, “Miss Louise J. Mallard”, January 29, 1975, p. A2.

The Daily Herald,

The Daily Herald, “Albert Mallard”, April    , 1982, p.   .

 

Patsy Mallard Ellmer  875-2592

Maria Mallard    209-0087

 

 

DUSTI S. BONGE'

 

REFERENCES:

 

 

CHARLES KUPER

 

 

AUBREY H. GARDNER

Aubrey H. Gardner (1911-2004) was born February 10, 1911 in Tulsa, Oklahoma to George Gardner (1867-1930+) and          .  Parents divorced before 1920.  Died July 1, 2004 in Ocean Springs, Mississippi.

REFERENCES:

The Daily Herald,“Gardner buys out Collins sign shop”, November 9, 1954, p. 14.

The Ocean Springs News, “Art gallery resumes class”, January 13, 1966, p. 1.

_________________________________________________________________________________________________

 

MARY  ETHEL DISMUKES (1870-1952)

BEAUVOIR circa 1933

[image by Ray L. Bellande, June 2002.  Property of the Biloxi School System]

 

Mary Ethel Dismukes was chosen by Professor Ellsworth Woodward (1861-1939), director of the Issac Delgadgo Museum of Art at New Orleans, to participate in the Government sponsored Public Works of Art project.  Her commission, which commenced in mid-December 1933, was to paint in oils, of Beauvoir, the Church of the Redeemer, the monument commemorating the site where Iberville landed in 1699, and a phase of the fishing industry.  Miss Dismukes commissioned ended on February 15, 1934.(The Daily Herald, February 2, 1934, p. 6)

Mary Ethel Dismukes (1870-1952) was born at Pulaski, Giles County, Tennessee, on April 13, 1870, the daughter of George R. Dismukes (1840-1909), a merchant, and Adella McDonald Dismukes (1846-1924).  Her father expired at Pulaski, Tennessee in March 1909.   She was present for his demise.(1880 Giles Co., Tennessee Federal Census T_9 1257, ED 111 and The Daily Herald, March 22, 1909, p. 1)

Miss Dismukes came to Biloxi in 1897, with her family.  She resided at 113 Lameuse Street with her mother.  Her brother was George E. Dismuke (1874-1937).  Miss Dismukes was a member of the Woman’s Club (Biloxi), Magnolia Art Club, Biloxi Tree Association.(The Daily Herald, February 18, 1952, p. 4)

Mary Ethel Dismukes, called Ethel, had studied at the Art Student’s League of New York under John H. Twachtmann (1853-1902), Clifford Carleton (1867-1946), and Kenyon C. Cox (1856-1919) from 1900 until she was hired by the Biloxi public schools in May 1902.  Miss Dismukes was the first principal of an art department in the Biloxi educational system.  Her hiring resulted in an art studio being incorporated into the new addition to the Biloxi Central School on Main Street.  At Biloxi, those students choosing her course were instructed in charcoal drawing; pen and ink drawing; painting in oil, water color, and pastel; and china painting.  Burnt wood etching or pyrography was also offered.(The Biloxi Daily Herald, May 30, 1902, p. 8)

 

George E. Dismukes and Adolyn Gale

George Edward Dismukes (1874-1937) was a mining engineer.  He was born at Pulaski, Tennessee on July 17, 1874, and educated in a private college there.  George E. Dismukes married Adolyn Gale (1864-1953), a native of Memphis, Tennessee.  His livelihood took him to Georgia, Alaska, California, Oregon and other mining districts of North America.  Dismukes was an authority on gold mining and a mine appraiser.  He expired at Ethel’s home at 113 Lameuse Street on August 18, 1937.  George and Adolyn had lived with Miss Dismukes for approximately ten years.  His corporal remains were sent to Memphis, Tennessee for burial in the Elmwood Cemetery.(The Daily Herald, August 18, 1937, p. 2)

Adolyn Gale Dismukes was also an artist.  In 1929, her oil paintings were exhibited in the Tennessee Painter’s Exhibit, an annual show, which was held at the Watkins Institute in Nashville.  Since the 1890s, Mrs. Dismukes had traveled to Alaska with her husband.  Works from this region dominated her exhibition as she had oil paintings titled: Bering Sea, Aurora Light, and Valley of The Thousand Smoke.(The Daily Herald, June 13, 1929, p. 2)

Adolyn G. Dismukes expired at Biloxi, Mississippi on July 22, 1953.  She was the daughter of Thomas Gale (1816-1912), an Englishman, who founded the Lemon-Gale Dry Goods Company in Memphis.  Colonel Gale had come to America in 1823, and spent his entire life in the South, primarily in Tennessee.  Adolyn G. Dismukes’ corporal remains were interred in the Elmwood Cemetery at Memphis, Tennessee.(The Daily Herald, July 23, 1953, p. 12)

 

1903 Art Exhibit

In late May 1903, Miss Dismukes held an art exhibit of her student's annual works at the Main School.(The Biloxi Daily Herald, May 20, 1903, p. 6)

 

1904 Art exhibit

Mary Ethel Dismukes, Biloxi High School art teacher, opened her studio in the high school building on November 15th for public viewing of the charcoal, pen and ink, oil, water color, and china painting that was done by her students and herself.(The Biloxi Daily Herald, November 15, 1904, p. 5) 

 

Biloxi School of Art

Miss Dismukes spent the summer of 1909 at Pulaski, Tennessee.  By June 1910, Miss Dismukes had opened a private art academy at 131 Lameuse Street, her family home.  Classes in drawing and painting were held in the weekday mornings during the summer months.(The Biloxi Daily Herald, September 4, 1909, p. 8 and The Daily Herald, May 30, 1910, p. 8)

 

Dresden exhibit

In 1911, Ethel Dismukes traveled to the International Art Exhibit at Dresden, Germany.  Dresden, a large industrial and arts center, is situated in east central Germany on the Elbe River.  Dresden china is made at Meissen, fourteen miles to the northwest. (Webster’s, 1988, p. 343 and 748)

1913 Western Tour

In early July 1913, Miss Dismukes ventured to the West Coast to reacquaint herself with relatives and friends residing there.  Before her fall return to Biloxi, she planned side trips to the Mariposa and Calararus Valleys, as well as Yosemite and Yellowstone National Parks.  While in California, Miss Dismukes went to San Diego, Los Angeles, and San Francisco.(The Daily Herald, July 7, 1913, p. 7)           

 

Invite to Leipsic (Leipzig)

In December 1913, the Biloxi city schools received an invitation to participate in the May 1914, International Art Exhibit at Leipsic, Germany.  Leipsic, now spelled Leipzig, is a large industrial-cultural center in east central Germany, about 60 miles south east of Dresden.  It is the site of Karl Marx University and the burial place of J.S. Bach.  The quality of the art produced by Miss Dismuke’s Biloxi pupils made an excellent impression at Dresden, which secured an offer to exhibit at Leipsic.(The Daily Herald, December 29, 1913, p. 3 and Webster’s, 1988, p. 660)

 

Retirement

In May 1914, Ethel Dismukes retired from her art teacher’s status in the Biloxi public school system.  The culmination of her career in education was marked by an exhibition of student works from all the city schools held at the Central school’s art department.  Student artisans demonstrated their abilities in traditional art as well as stained glass window design, sofa pillow design, paper cutting, home design and interior furnishings.  Miss Dismukes was lauded as having, “done magnificent work as instructor in this department”.  She planned to hold private art classes after her teaching career ended.(The Daily Herald, May 22, 1914, p. 2)

In June 1910, Miss Dismukes had opened a private art academy at 131 Lameuse Street, her family home.  Classes in drawing and painting were held in the weekday mornings during the summer months.  Miss Dismukes continued private art lessons well into her retirement years.  She was a major force with William Woodward (1859-1939) in starting the Gulf Coast Art Association in the mid-1920s.

 

Lameuse Street

In June 1919, Miss Dismukes acquired a house and lot on the west side of Lameuse Street between Water Street and Beach Boulevard, from F.L. and Edith Stone.  The Dismukes lot was forty-five feet wide and one hundred-one feet deep.(HARCO, Ms. Deed Trust Deed Bk. 124, pp. 69-70). 

In September 1935, Ethel Dismukes sold her house to Mrs. Geneva Adams Hale of Elkins, West Virginia.  The consideration was $1500 cash.(HARCO, Ms. Land Deed Bk. 206, pp. 549-550)

In September 1940, Ethel Dismukes and Geneva A. Hale recorded a lease purchase agreement in the Chancery Court of Harrison County, Mississippi.  The rent payable to Grant and Tonsmeire, local attorneys, was $20 per month in advance on the 14th day of each month.  Miss Dismukes was responsible for the water rent.  She had an option to purchase the house from Mrs. Hale, for $1500 plus interest of 8% annually from February 11, 1933 to the date of purchase.(HARCO, Ms. Land Deed Bk. 234, pp. 566-567)

In September 1941, Mrs. Hale vended her Lameuse Street property to Miss Dismukes for $2350.(HARCO, Ms. Land Deed Bk. 243, pp. 406-407)  

Ethel Dismukes sold her house to Mrs. Victoria S. Kornman for $12,600. (HARCO, Ms. Land Deed Bk. 243, pp. 406-407)

 

1926 Exhibit at Delgado Art Museum

In the fall of 1926, the New Orleans Art Association held an exhibit at the Delgado Art Museum.  Miss Dismukes, Biloxi resident and a NOLA Art Association member, had two entries in the show of twenty-seven artists.  Her canvasses were titled 'Golden Glow' and 'Rosy Dawn' respectively.  'Golden Glow', a sylvan-landscape scene in the Biloxi areawas lauded by visitors for its strong color, while 'Rosy Dawn', was painted from the porch of the beach home of Mr. Jahncke of New Orleans, formerly the domicile of Mrs. E.R. Johnson.(The Daily Herald, December 3, 1926, p. 9)

 

The Gulf Coast Art Association and Art Center

William Woodward (1859-1939) was the founder of the Mississippi Gulf Coast Art Association during his retirement years at Biloxi.  In mid-November 1926, he and interested parties met at the Biloxi Public Library and commenced this cultural body, which aspired to influence the future aesthetics of the Mississippi Gulf Coast.  Among the charter members of the organization were: Mary Ethel Dismukes (1870-1952) and Louise Mallard (1900-1975) of Biloxi; Miss Sarah K. Smith (1878-1930+) of Gulf Park College; Dean Parkhurst Woleben (1891-1968) of Gulfport; and Ella Layden Roche, Edward C. de Celle, and Roderick Dempster MacKenzie (1865-1941) of Mobile.(The Daily Herald, November 19, 1926, p. 2)

The Mississippi Gulf Coast Art Association held its first annual exhibit at the Biloxi Public Library from February 4th until February 20th, 1927, Miss Ethel Dismukes (1870-1952), then secretary of the organization, exhibited photography and oil paintings.  Her “The Burden Bearer” was voted “the best-liked picture”.  William Woodward won the gold medal for “Our Street”.(The Daily Herald, February 3, 1927, p. 2 and February 21, 1927, p. 2)

 

1928 Exhibit

At an exhibition of her works sponsored by the Woman’s Club and held at the Biloxi Public Library from February 23 to February 27, 1928, Miss Dismukes displayed an eclectic ensemble of approximately eighty art objects-over forty photographs, eighteen oil paintings, four watercolors, two pastels and craft work in china, copper, and wood.  In addition, she delivered two lectures, History and Legends of the Gulf Coast and the Vieux Carre.  By popular vote, visitors to her exhibition selected “Rosy Dawn” and “Reflections” as the best in her show.  Miss Dismukes sold several pieces and received solicitations for portraits.(The Daily Herald, February 22, 1928, p. 2, February 23, 1928, p. 2, February 25, 1928, p. 2, and February 27, 1928, p. 2)

1929 Exhibits

In mid-January 1929, the Biloxi Public Library was the venue of an art exhibit of the professional women artists of Mississippi.  Among those showing their water colors, pastels, and oil paintings were: Mrs. W.Q. Sharp of Jackson, vice president of the Mississippi Art Association and worker in pastels and water color; Miss Mary Clair Sherwood, teacher at All Saints College at Vicksburg; Miss Charlotte E. Tibbs of Biloxi; Miss Betty McArthur, a teacher at M.S..C.W; Marie A. Hull (1890-1980) of Jackson who recently had three works accepted by the Philadelphia Watercolor Association and others at the Chicago Art Institute; Miss Mary Ethel Dismukes is exhibiting "Lover's Lane, Ocean Springs", "The Waifs", and "Spring", which was sketched at City Park in NOLA; Adolyn Gale Dismukes, Mrs. George Dismukes, was showing "Mt. Mckinley, Alaska", "Auroral Lights", and "Valley of Ten Thousand Smokes"; Mrs. Anne Wells Mounger of Pass Christian and Miss Sarah K. Smith of Gulf Park College also sent paintings.  A $20 prize for the most popular painting in the exhibit was sponsored by the First National Bank.(The Daily Herald, January 14, 1929, p. 2)

When the Coast Zone of Woman’s Clubs meeting was held in the Biloxi Public Library on October 31, 1929, an exhibit of Miss Dismukes photographs were on display in the clubroom.  The images were of local scenery appropriate for the occasion.(The Jackson County Times, November 9, 1929, p. 3)

 

Woman’s Club

Miss Dismukes served as chairman of the art department for the Biloxi Woman’s Club for several years.  In March 1930, she presented a talk to this group titled, “the art of moving picture”.(The Daily Herald, March 20, 1930, p. 2)

 

1932 Exhibit

In late October 1932, Miss Dismukes replaced her former “sidewalk” display of oil paintings and photographs in a store window on West Howard Avenue in Biloxi, with a new showing of her work.  This photographic work dealt primarily with the Jefferson Davis family of Beauvoir.(The Daily Herald, October 31, 1932, p. 2)

 

1932 Exhibit GCAA

The 1932 non-juried art show of the Gulf Coast Art Association was held in mid-December 1932, at the Biloxi Public Library.  Fourteen member artists exhibited their oils, watercolors, pastels, etchings, and wood block prints.  There were no craft works in the show.  Dean Babcock of Denver, Colorado planned to donate three wood block prints and six prints to Biloxi High school, if they were desired.(The Daily Herald, December 10, 1932, p. 2)

 

Art Center

In early December 1932, local artists decided to commence an “Art Center” in Biloxi.  Located on the north side of West Howard Avenue between Reynoir and Fayard Streets, adjacent to D’Aquin’s Drugstore, the “Art Center” may have been the first artist public meeting place and artisit co-op on the Mississippi Gulf Coast.  In addition to rotating art exhibits and association meetings, the Gulf Coast Art Association planned to have a workroom in their building, with north light, which is considered excellent for drawing and painting.  Classes and workshops were planned for the workroom.  The “Art Center” opened in late December 1932.(The Daily Herald, December 6, 1932, p. 2 and December 29, 1932, p. 2)       

Photographic recognition

“Bellman Street Oak”, a photographic image made by Miss Dismukes won the Mississippi Award given by the American Forestry Association in their competition “Most Beautiful Photographs of Trees in America”.  A 1934, traveling exhibition of award winning photographs and other excellent images was planned by the American Forestry Association.  They selected four additional photographs by Ethel Dismukes for this venue, which was limited to one hundred photographs.  They were: “Ruskin Oak”, “Crawford Oak”, “Close Up of Crawford Oak”, and “Parkingham Oak”.(The Daily Herald, January 9, 1934, p. 2)

 

PWA 1934   

Mary Ethel Dismukes was chosen by Professor Ellsworth Woodward (1861-1939), director of the Issac Delgadgo Museum of Art at New Orleans, to participate in the Government sponsored Public Works of Art project.  Her commission, which commenced in mid-December 1933, was to paint in oils, of Beauvoir, the Church of the Redeemer, the monument commemorating the site where Iberville landed in 1699, and a phase of the fishing industry.  Miss Dismukes commissioned ended on February 15, 1934.(The Daily Herald, February 2, 1934, p. 6)

 

1936 Exhibit

The 1936 juried art show of the Gulf Coast Art Association was held in the sun parlor of the White House Hotel.  The forty-nine-piece show opened on March 1, 1936 and was available for public viewing for about one week.    Miss Dismukes exhibited three photographs: “Inn by the Sea” (oil tinted); “Lover’s Lane”; and “Wind Swept”.  

Professor William Woodward of Biloxi showed the following: “Portrait of Patricia” (oil); “Biloxi Light”, “Ship at Sunset”, and Ship in Moonlight” (Rafaelle oil crayons); and “Benachi Avenue Bioxi”, “Oyster Wharf”, “Yellow Fever Quarantine”, and “Pass Christian” (etchings).   Dean Babcock of Denver, Colorado presented several wood engravings.(The Daily Herald, March 2, 1936, p. 2)

 

WPA images

In early December 1936, Miss Mary Ethel Dismukes spoke to the Gulf Coast Art Association at Biloxi.  Her topic was about a photographic project that she and two other photographers in Mississippi were involved.  Miss Dismukes was traveling in the southern counties of Mississippi making images to be used in the histories being written by the writer's group, probably for the WPA Federal Art Project, which was instituted in May 1936.  Miss Dismukes photographs were taken of antiques, fire arms, elderly people, unusual people, i.e. 'the Whittaker negroes' and the 'hot boys', Caucasian with marked physical traits.  She also spoke of the history of Biloxi.(The Daily Herald, December 8, 1936, p. 5)

 

1941

Miss Dismukes was a founder in September 1941 of the Biloxi Camera Club.  She was its first president. Sidney Levine of Philadelphia was vice-president and John Lockett, treasurer.  Their first meeting was in the Biloxi Community Center on September 18, 1941.(The Daily Herald, September 19, 1941, p. 7)

 

1941 Exhibition

In what may have been her most versatile art showing, Miss Dismukes held an exhibition at the Biloxi Communicty House shortly before Thanksgiving 1941.  The show featured watercolors, etchings, oil paintings, photographs hand-tined in both oil and watercolors, plain photographs [black and white], and craft work.  Of special interest were her excellent study of Negro people and of the local, magnificent Live Oak trees.  Miss Dismukes also took pleasure in creating wild flower images with her camera.(The Daily Herald, November 22, 1941, p. 3)

 

 1943 Art Week State Chairman

In October 1943, the American Artists Professional League appointed Mary Ethel Dismukes as the Mississippi State chairman for national art week which was held November 1st through November 7th.  Miss Alethea Clemens was the Biloxi chairman for the local event.  The annex on the rear lawn of the Biloxi Community Center was the venue for national art week.  Local and Mississippi coast artists participating were: Mrs. Albert Tee Austin; Mrs. Edgar Balthrope; Alethea Clemens; Mrs. George Dismukes; Mrs. Robert Drover; Sergeant William T. Dunn; Mrs. J.C. McNair; Sarah K. Smith; Charlotte Tibbs; and Estelle Parker.(The Daily Herald, October 21, 1943, p. 4 and NOvember 5, 1943, p. 3)

 

Dismukes Art School of Art

The Dismukes Art School of Art was founded in the late 1940s.  It was the vehicle through which she gave private art instructions at Biloxi.  On November 27, 1948, Miss Dismukes opened her 'Little Art Gallery' at 113 Lameuse Street in conjunction with the art of her students and invited exhibitors.(The Daily Herald, May 31, 1949, p. 5)

 

Demise

Miss Ethel Dismukes died at Biloxi, Mississippi on February 18, 1952.  She was survived by Adolyn Gale Dismukes (1864-1953), her sister in law.  Miss Dismukes had been in St. Petersburg, Florida since September 1951 and had returned to Biloxi in early February.  In addition to her many years serving as secretary of the MGAA, Ethel Dismukes was past president of the Woman's Club, assisted in the organization of the Magnolia Art Club, and the Biloxi Tree Association.  Her corporal remains were sent to Pulaski, Tennessee for internment in the family cemetery.(The Daily Herald, February 18, 1952, p. 4)

"Landing of D'Iberville"

"Iberville landing painting evokes memories"

[written by Ray L. Bellande and published in The Ocean Springs Record on May 22, 2008]

 

The recent showing of Iberville’s Landing, a landscape, oil painting, by Mary Ethel Dismukes in the Hancock Bank building on Washington Avenue, awakened in me journeys of another time.  As a lad growing up in 1950s in the Back Bay section of Biloxi, we often crossed the Back Bay of Biloxi by motorcar.  Invariably, my father would point to the cross and boulder in the St. Theresa Catholic School yard nestled on the margin of Back Bay and comment, “That is where Iberville landed.”  Naturally, my siblings and I didn’t know nor were sure of who or what was an Iberville or a D’Iberville was?

Mary Ethel Dismukes (1870-1952), called Ethel, the artist, was a native of Pulaski, Tennessee.  She had studied at the Art Student’s League of New York under John H. Twachtmann (1853-1902), Clifford Carleton (1867-1946), and Kenyon C. Cox (1856-1919) from 1900 until she was hired by the Biloxi public schools in May 1902.  Miss Dismukes was the first principal of an art department in the Biloxi educational system.  Her hiring resulted in an art studio being incorporated into the new addition to the Biloxi Central School on Main Street.  At Biloxi, those students choosing her course were instructed in charcoal drawing; pen and ink drawing; painting in oil, water color, and pastel; and china painting.  Burnt wood etching or pyrography was also offered.(The Biloxi Daily Herald, May 30, 1902, p. 8)

 

Manuel Jalanivich and Alice Tee Austin

Manuel Jalanivich (1897-1944), a Biloxi native, became both a public and private art pupil of Miss Dismukes.  He would become an acclaimed California potter and clay sculptor.  Circa 1922, with his life partner, Ingvardt Olsen (1888-1959), a Danish ceramicist who had studied at the Royal Danish Copenhagen Chinese Kilns in Copenhagen, Denmark, Manuel started Jalan Pottery in San Francisco to produce commercial ceramic ware.  It was identified by its large scale, simple form, color, style, and crackled glaze.  Jalanivich created wheel-thrown forms and also did extensive clay modeling, while Olsen specialized in glazing.  Olsen’s Persian or faience blue and “egg-plant” glazes were well accepted.  W.F. Dietrich in 1928, described the Jalan Pottery as:  Jalanivich and Olsen are making an attractive line of glazed pottery using a buff-burning body and lead glazes.  Their output is hand-molded on a potter’s wheel.  It is fired in a round kiln, approximately 3 feet inside diameter designed by them and built by the gas company, city gas being used for fuel.  The clay, from California sources, is fired to 2000 F and the glaze to 1500-1700 F.         

Jalanivich and Olsen marketed their ceramics well.  In addition to their Bay area patronage, Gumps Department Store in San Francisco vended Jalan Pottery.  Jalan’s adaptation to a Chinese-style form met with great success in San Francisco, as many affluent citizens were decorating their domiciles with teak furniture, Coromandel screens, lacquered chests, and Middle Eastern of Oriental rugs.(Bray, 1980, p. 43)

Alice Tee Austin (1908-2001), nee Weir, who would reside on Front Beach near the Ocean Springs Inner Harbor, in the Parlin-Austin House for nearly sixty-years, was also a student of Miss Dismukes.  She studied art contemporaneously with Manuel Jalanivich.  Her ability as an artist was lauded at the May 1916 art exhibit held by Ethel Dismukes for her private students.  Miss Weir’s paintings of a candle stick and wildflowers were noted by The Daily Herald columnist covering the event.  Alice had also creatively decorated Miss Dismukes doorbell with raffia.(The Daily Herald, May 22, 1916, p. 3)

Miss Alice T. Weir was also a pianist of note.  She was under the tutelage of the Sisters of Mercy at the Sacred Heart Academy in December 1921, when her interpretation of Puerto Rican composer Juan Morel Campos’ (1857-1896) “Indilio’ was praised by critics as:. “played with perfect ease and carrying out a number of difficult passages.”  While at Newcomb College in 1930, Miss Weir won first prize for a poster contest sponsored by the Louisiana Society for Prevention of Cruelty to Animals.  While at Newcomb, she continued to paint in oils and water color and won awards at several art exhibits for her excellent works.(The Daily Herald, December 15, 1921, p. 6 and May 27, 1930, p. 2)

Retirement

In May 1914, Ethel Dismukes retired from her art teacher’s status in the Biloxi public school system.  The culmination of her career in education was marked by an exhibition of student works from all the city schools held at the Central school’s art department.  In June 1910, Miss Dismukes had opened a private art academy at 131 Lameuse Street, her family home.  Classes in drawing and painting were held in the weekday mornings during the summer months.  Miss Dismukes continued private art lessons well into her retirement years.  She was a major force with William Woodward (1859-1939) in starting the Gulf Coast Art Association in the mid-1920s.(The Daily Herald, May 22, 1914, pp. 1-2)

William Woodward

In 1884, William Woodward had relocated to New Orleans from his native New England.  Here he taught art as an associate professor at the new Tulane College and High School.  Professor Woodward retired as “professor emeritus of the Newcomb College of Art” in 1921.  He and his spouse retired to Biloxi, Mississippi in 1924, after a laudable career in the Crescent City.

Among his many accomplishments, William Woodward helped organize the Newcomb College; founded the New Orleans Art Pottery where he hired Joseph Fortune Meyer (1848-1931) and George E. Ohr (1857-1918); assisted in the design of the early building on the Tulane University campus; protested the destruction of the Cabildo; founded the Tulane School of Architecture; and was associated with the Vieux Carre Commission’s efforts to preserve the areas historical architecture.

Iberville’s marker and the DAR

In Chapter XI of ‘Broken Pot’, the unpublished historical narrative, of Schuyler Poitevent (1875-1936), who resided at 318 Lovers Lane in Ocean Springs, he relates the origin of the wooden cross and marker that in April 1920 were placed by the Gulf Coast Chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution on the Back Bay of Biloxi in present day D’Iberville, then called North Biloxi or “across de la baie”, to commemorate the April 1699 landing of Pierre Le Moyne Sieur d’Iberville (1661-1706).  The site chosen by the DAR was just east of the 1928 Biloxi Bay Bridge.  Prior to selecting North Biloxi, this organization approached Schuyler Poitevent and suggested that his Biloxi Bay home on Lovers Lane be the site of the memorial to Iberville and Fort Maurepas.  Mr. Poitevent vehemently opposed the idea.  In response to this rejection, the local DAR chose to build their memorial in what would become the schoolyard of St. Theresa’s Catholic School.  Fortunately this travesty has been removed and now rests ironically in a glass case in the Sacred Heart Catholic School on Le Moyne Boulevard at D’Iberville.

 

1699 Historical Committee

Iberville’s Landing by Miss Dismukes was acquired by the Walter Anderson Museum of Art in 2005?  It was loaned to the 1699 Historical Committee for their April 25th soiree held in the Hancock Bank lobby.  This event preceded the 2008 Landing of Iberville commemoration, which was held on April 27, 2008 on Front Beach with Dr. Strawford Hale Dees, representing Iberville and Dr. William W. Walker, as Bienville.  This was the first 'Landing' celebration since Hurricane Katrina in August 2005.(The Ocean Springs Record, April 24, 2008, p. A1)

     The 1699 Historical Committee commenced the Iberville Landing event in early April 1974 when the 275thanniversary of French Canadian hero, Pierre Le Moyne, Sieur d’ Iberville (1671-1706) arrival and erection of Fort Maurepas at present day Ocean Springs was celebrated on Front Beach.  The first cast of this reenactment included: Orey A. Young (1892-1986) who portrayed Iberville; Frank T. Pickel (1912-1982) as Bienville; and Marby R. Penton (1922-1995), as Commandant Sauvolle.  The 1699 Historical Committee received its State charter in March 1971.  Betty Bradford Milsted was president.(The Ocean Springs News, March 11, 1971, p. 1 and April 11, 1974, p. 3)

 

REFERENCES:

Patti Carr Black, Art in Mississippi (1720-1980), (University of Mississippi Press: Jackson, Mississippi-1998).

Cantey V. Sutton, History of Art in Mississippi, (Dixie Press: Gulfport, Mississippi-1929).

Webster’s New Geographical Dictionary, (Merriam-Webster Inc.: Springfield, Massachusetts-1988)

Journals

The Biloxi Daily Herald, “Art Department”, May 30, 1902.

The Biloxi Daily Herald, “City News”, May 20, 1903.

The Biloxi Daily Herald, “City News”, November 15, 1904.

The Biloxi Daily Herald, “City News”, March 22, 1909.

The Biloxi Daily Herald, “City News”, September 4, 1909.

The Daily Herald, “Biloxi News Paragraphs”, May 30, 1910.

The Daily Herald, “Leading Memphian Died Early Today At Home In Biloxi”, April 19, 1912.

The Daily Herald, “Local News Paragraphs of Interest”, July 7, 1913.

The Daily Herald, “Biloxi High School doings”, April 18, 1914.

The Daily Herald, “Art Exhibit At Central School”, May 22, 1914.

The Daily Herald, “Biloxi youth [Manuel Jalanivich] makes pottery”, March 15, 1915.

The Daily Herald, “Class exhibits work of art”, May 7, 1915.

The Daily Herald, “Art Exhibit is enjoyed by many”, May 22, 1916.

The Daily Herald, “Gulf Coast Association”, November 30, 1926.

The Daily Herald, “Gulf Coast Association”, November 30, 1926.

The Daily Herald, “Artist from coast attracts attention at Orleans exhibit", December 3, 1926.

The Daily Herald, “Opening of Art Exhibit at Library”, February 3, 1927.

The Daily Herald, “Award Made by Jury of Gifted and Competent Artists for Gulf Coast Art Association Exhibition at Biloxi February 4”, February 5, 1927.

The Daily Herald, “Jalan Pottery Arrives”, February 9, 1927.

The Daily Herald, “Opening of Art Exhibit at Library”, February 3, 1927.

The Daily Herald, “Art Exhibits Closes Saturday”, February 14, 1927.

The Daily Herald, “Art Exhibits Closes”, February 21, 1927.

The Daily Herald, “Exhibition of Pictures”, February 22, 1928.

The Daily Herald, “Art Exhibit At Library”, February 23, 1928.

The Daily Herald, “ Art Exhibit Great Success”, February 25, 1928.

The Daily Herald, “Art Exhibit To Remain Open”, February 27, 1928.

The Daily Herald, “Fine Arts Department Exhibit”, January 11, 1929.

The Daily Herald, “Exhibit of Women Artists”, January 14, 1929.

The Daily Herald, “Another Biloxian Exhibits”, June 13, 1929.

The Daily Herald, “Woman’s Club Meeting”, March 20, 1930.

The Daily Herald, “Miss Dismukes’ Exhibit”, October 31, 1932.

The Daily Herald, “Art Center to Open”, December 6, 1932.

The Daily Herald, “Exhibit Opens Sunday”, December 10, 1932.

The Daily Herald, “Art Center Interesting”, December 29, 1932.

The Daily Herald, “Biloxi Wins Recognition”, January 9, 1934.

The Daily Herald, “Coast Artists Are Painting Scenes For PWA Art Project”, February 2, 1934.

The Daily Herald, “Fifty pictures at art exhibit”, December 10, 1934.

The Daily Herald, “Annual Art Show Opens”, April 9, 1935.

The Daily Herald, “Talks on Historic points of interest”, December 8, 1936.

The Daily Herald, “Art Exhibit Excellent”, March 2, 1936.

The Daily Herald, “George Dismukes Dies”, August 18, 1937.

The Daily Herald, “Exhibition of Pictures”, August 18, 1941.

The Daily Herald, "Biloxi Camera Club organized", September 19, 1941. 

The Daily Herald, “Miss Dismukes wins Chamber of Commerce Cup”, October 1, 1943.

The Daily Herald, “Miss Dismukes is art week chairman”, October 21, 1943.

The Daily Herald, “Art exhibition attracting many visitors”, November 5, 1943.
The Daily Herald, “Opening art gallery”, November 13, 1948.
The Daily Herald, “Art Gallery opens”, November 23, 1948.
The Daily Herald, “Visit Art Exhibit”, May 31, 1949.

The Daily Herald, “Ceramics Display”, October 1, 1949.

The Daily Herald, “Fall Art Exhibit”, October 22, 1949.

The Daily Herald, “Coast Art Exhibits Are Being Planned”, October 29, 1949.

The Daily Herald, “Art Exhibit”, November 7, 1949.

The Daily Herald, “Miss Dismukes Dies”, February 18, 1952.

The Daily Herald, “Mrs. Dismukes Dies”, July 23, 1953, p. 12.

The Jackson County Times, “Woman’s Club Notes”, November 9, 1919.

The Ocean Springs Record, "Painting to be part of d'Iberville commemoration", April 24, 2008, p. B4.