Interesting Things

By Ray L. Bellande

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Lopez Family

 

 

LAZARO LOPEZ

Lazaro Lopez and Julia Dulion Lopez

Lazaro ‘Laz’ Lopez (1850-1903) was born at Aviles, Asturias Province, north western Spain in October 1850.   He left Spain for Cuba in 1863 and immigrated to the United States landing in Texas before arriving at Biloxi in 1868.  In late July 1870, Lazaro was domiciled at Biloxi with Joseph Garcia (1828-1870+), also a Spaniard, who was the proprietor of a coffee house.  Lazaro made his livelihood at this time keeping bar with Andrew Nugarre (1840-1870+), a fellow Spaniard.(The Biloxi Daily Herald, September 26, 1903, p. 1 and 1870 Harrison Co., Mississippi Federal Census M593_729, p. 323B, image 655)

 

On August 19, 1871 at Harrison County, Mississippi, Judge Lyman B. Holley married Lazaro Lopez  and Julia Dulion (1857-1918), the daughter of Arnaud Michel Dulion (1830?-1870), a French immigrant, and Mary Ann Keegan or Briscoe (1832-1890), a native of Ireland.  Their children were: Josephine Mary Angeline Lopez (1872-1892); Teresa Lopez (1873-1951) m. Hyman M. Folkes (1871-1926); Clara Josephine Lopez (1875-1895); Lazaro T. Lopez (1877-1918) married Eurilda ‘Lily’ Seal (1879-1966); Arnaud Lopez (1880-1948) m. Nellie May Gorman (1890-1952); Erena Lopez (1885-1940) married Edward L. Brady (1874-1939); Julius M. Lopez (1886-1958) m. Belle Markey (1887-1946); Juanita Olivia Lopez (1890-1891); Rowena Maria Lopez (1895-1986) married Philip Columbus Caldwell (1892-1930+); and Noreta Julia Lopez (1896-1960) married James Rucks Yerger Jr. (1892-1931).(Harrison Co., Mississippi MRB  6, p. 76)

 

Early land acquisitions in downtown Biloxi

In 1870, Lazaro Lopez acquired a lot in Biloxi on the northwest corner of Pass Christian and Point Cadet Road, now West Howard Avenue and Reynoir Street in a tax sale.  In November 1884, Mrs. Frederique Reynoir and Arthur Reynoir conveyed to Laz Lopez a small lot, 20 feet by 40 feet, on the west side of Reynoir Street.  Laz Lopez owned the land to the south; Mrs. Nelson was to the north; and Lazarus Seymour bordered to the west.(Harrison Co., Mississippi Land Deed Bk. 20, p. 459)

 

1890 new residence  

J.R. Harkess was contracted to erect a $7000 residence for Laz Lopez and Julia Dulion Lopez on the corner of Pass Christian Street and Reynoir Street. In early March, the Lopez home was "assuming architectural proportions for beauty and prominence second to none..  By late April 1890, the Lopez domicile was described as elegant and rapidly approaching completion.(The Biloxi Herald, January 18, 1890, p. 4, March 8, 1890, p. 4 and April 26, 1890, p. 4)      

 

1890 store building

 

 

1895

In August 1895, Lazaro Lopez, Sr. acquired two very valuable, contiguous lots on the southeast corner of West Howard Avenue and Reynoir Street from the Estate of Constantino Olivari (1841-1894), an Italian immigrant entrepreneur.  Mr. Olivari was the proprietor of a ship chandlery and grocery store on Howard Avenue and Lameuse Street.  The Olivari tracts had 120-feet on West Howard Avenue and ran south with 150-feet fronting on Reynoir.  After Mr. Olivari’s demise, two of his children Eulalie Olivari Clark (1872-, the spouse of James Penton Clark (1872-1907+), and Vincent Jean Olivari (1874-1934), created a forced heirship sale in the Chancery Court of Harrison County, Mississippi, which Mr. Lopez and his family, was the beneficiary.(Harrison Co., Mississippi land Deed Bk. 33, p. 113 and Harrison Co., Mississippi Chancery Court Cause No. 683-1895)           

 

Commerce

The L. Lopez & Company store building was erected on the northeast corner of Pass Christian Street and Reynoir Street in the spring of 1890.  An old structure on the site was demolished before the two-story, (The Biloxi Herald, May 17, 1890, p. 4)

 

New store started in early May 1900.(The Biloxi Herald, April 27, 1900, p. 8)

 

Upon his demise and subsequent probate in 1903, Teresa Lopez Folkes was legated a one-half interest in this property.  Theodore P. Dulion (1861-1907), the uncle of Mrs. Folkes, owned the other undivided, one-half interest.  After the death of Mr. Dulion in 1907, his one-half interest was left to his children: Una C. Dulion; Paul Dulion; Barton Dulion; Roy Dulion; Fay Dulion Hermann; and Julia Abbey Dulion.  They sold their interest to Tersea Lopez Folkes in February 1924 for $20,000.  Grant’s Drug Store was situated on this property at this time.(Harrison Co., Mississippi Land Deed Bk. 33, p. 113 and Bk. 140, p. 567 and Bk. 140, p. 588)

 

SEAFOOD PIONEER

Lopez, Elmer and Company

The Lopez, Elmer and Company was organized in 1881, with a capital stock of $8,000 by Lazaro Lopez (1850-1903), F. William Elmer (1847-1926), W.K.M. Dukate (1853-1916), William Gorenflo (1844-1932), and James Maycock (1826-1892).  The land on which the Lopez, Elmer and Company plant was built in 1881, was purchased from Joseph Diaz Jr. (1845-1923) and Adele Santa Cruz Diaz (1846-1915) on June 29, 1881 for $100.  The lot had a front of 82 feet on Back Bay and ran south 196 feet.  Reynoir Street was the western boundary.  Diaz had purchased a tract here in 1873, from John Bradford.  It was 82 feet x 950 feet and cost $200.  Henry Diaz (1872-1944), a son of Joseph Diaz Jr., operated a store on the northwest corner of Reynoir and Chartres Street, now Bay View Avenue.  In 1914, Mr. Diaz was operating a canning company east of the Biloxi Canning Company.(Harrison Co., Mississippi Land Deed Bk. Bk.18, p. 20 and Bk. 13, pp. 53-54)

 

The Pascagoula Democrat-Star reported on December 30, 1881, that the Lopez, Elmer and Company was placing its canning machines in the factory.  The proprietors had over one hundred, local, white men and boys on the payroll.  They were employed as follows: forty-four openers, forty-five men manning fifteen boats, twenty or more canners and wharf men.(The Pascagoula Democrat-Star, December 30, 1881, p. 3)

 

Since none of these Biloxi seafood pioneers had any experience in canning operations, W.K.M. Dukate was selected to go to Baltimore where the packing industry was well established.  Here he observed procedures, gathered technical information, and purchased machinery for the coving of oysters and canning shrimp.  It is very probable that Mr. Dukate brought Charles Patten (1835-1922), a Baltimore native, to Biloxi in 1881, to manage the new cannery.  Patton remained associated with the cannery until his wife, Ellen Spencer, died here in February 1915.  He returned to Baltimore where he resided at 1527 North Caroline Street.  Mr. Patten expired at Baltimore on January 11, 1922.  His remains were interred in the Loudon Park Cemetery.(The Baltimore Sun, January 13, 1922)

 

The initial efforts of The Lopez, Elmer and Company were crude, but ready markets were available and the organization was profitable.  The Lopez, Elmer and Company was dissolved in 1884, and the Biloxi Canning Company, a corporation organized under the laws of the State of Mississippi was chartered on March 23, 1883. 

 

In rapid succession, after the dissolution of The Lopez, Elmer and Company, the Barataria Canning Company, William Gorenflo & Company, E.C. Joullian & Company, and J.T. Maybury were competing in the seafood packing business at Biloxi.  By 1902, the factories of Biloxi ranked second to those of Baltimore, Maryland in canning American oysters.(Twentieth Century Coast Edition of The Biloxi Daily Herald, 1902, p. 20)

 

 

Lopez, Dunbar’s Sons & Company   

In October 1888, they planned to dig another artesian well at their oyster factory.(The Biloxi Herald, October 27, 1888, p. 8)

 

In November 1889, the firm made large additions to their shucking sheds and solicited employment for ‘white and colored’.(The Biloxi Herald, November 16, 1889, p. 4)

 

Buying figs from Russell & Co. of Grand Bay, Alabama; George Foretich at Scranton [Pascagoula]; and Delmas Seymour of Ocean Springs.(The Pascagoula Democrat-Star, June 19, 1891, p. 2)

In July 1893, the Julius Elbert, a new tug boat, owned by Laz Lopez and W.K.M Dukate, arrived in Biloxi this week from Mobile.  It will put to work at Lopez, Dunbar’s Sons & Company.(The Biloxi Herald, July 1, 1893, p. 8)

 

Unfortunately the day has come that the Biloxi canners are forced to move their factories to other locations.  Has something to do with the oyster dredging law.(The Biloxi Daily Herald, February 4, 1900, p. 12)

 

 Lopez, Dunbar’s Sons & Co.

The Lopez, Dunbar’s Sons & Company was commenced in 1884, when Lazaro Lopez (1850-1903) and W.K.M. Dukate (1852-1916) resigned from the Biloxi Canning Company.  The Biloxi Canning Company was located in Section 27, T7S-R9W, in the city of Biloxi, Mississippi on the Back Bay of Biloxi, at the head of Reynoir Street.  It was originally called The Lopez, Elmer and Company.  This company was organized in 1881, with a capital stock of $8,000 by Lazaro Lopez, F. William Elmer (1847-1926), W.K.M. Dukate, William Gorenflo (1844-1932), and James Maycock (1826-1892).(1)

 

Lopez, Dunbar’s & Sons was situated on East Beach in Biloxi.  In 1895, it was the second largest oyster canning plant in the United States.  The factory utilized the Norton Brothers machinery to pack its shrimp with the patented muslin bag insuring a good product.  Its shrimp were marketed under the “Dunbar Standard”, “Deer head”, “Lion Head”, and “Pelicans” labels.

 

(see The Biloxi Herald, “Biloxi Chief Industry”, September 12, 1892, p. 4)

 

Lopez & Dukate

 

Lopez & Dukate cannery

In November 1899, Lopez & Dukate advertised for fifty boats to fish on the oyster banks and pay oystermen 40 cents per barrel of oyster.  They would pay for fifty boats to transport oysters from the reef to the factory wharf for 40 to 50 cents per barrel. The factory also sought one hundred oyster shuckers.(The Biloxi Daily Herald, November 10, 1899, p. 8)

In May 1901, a special train consisting of three coaches and a baggage car and transporting about eighty, Bohemians laborers, who were employed by Lopez & Dukate, left Biloxi for their Maryland homes to work in the seafood industry there in the summer months.  Biloxi’s oyster industry was closed until cooler weather in the fall.(The Biloxi Herald, May 5, 1901, p. 8)

In July 1902, L. Lopez & Dukate contracted with Ola (sic) Thompson (1874-1944) to build a large oyster cannery, house, store, warehouse, and Bohemian camp at the Rigolets in southeast Louisiana.  T.J. Rosell (1861-1923), Biloxi builder and mill owner, had crews busy at the Rigolets erecting a Catholic Church, which cost $1500, for the workers of the Lopez & Dukate cannery.(The Biloxi Daily Herald, July 16, 1902, p.8 and November 20, 1905, p. 1)

Lopez & Dukate-Sent Captain Fred Eaton aboard Tom, a large power boat,to Morgan City, Louisiana in late June 1907 to open a canning factory.(The Biloxi Daily Herald, June 29, 1907, p. 5)

 

Dunbars, Lopez, and Dukate Company

The Dunbars, Lopez, and Dukate Company was organized at NOLA on September 8, 1908. 

 

They advertised in September 1909, as follows:

 

DUNBARS, LOPEZ, and DUKATE COMPANY

Canning Factory

OYSTER, SHRIMP, and FRUIT PACKERS

Biloxi, Mississippi

Laborers wanted, both white and colored, in season

(The Daily Herald, September 29, 1909, p. 3)

 

In July 1911, workers at the Dunbars, Lopez, and Dukate Company were repairing factory schooners for the autumn pack in its boatyard.(The Daily Herald, July 20, 1911, p. 8)

 

In September 1915, the Dunbars, Lopez, and Dukate Company amended its charter and changed its nameto Dunbar Dukate Co. Inc.  At this time, the company was located at 1011 Maison Blanche Building with George H. Dunbar as president and Elbert L. Dukate, secretary.(Harrison Co., Mississippi Chattel Deed Bk. 57, p. 208-210 and The Daily Herald, October 14, 1915, p. 2)

 

Banker

Lazaro Lopez was a pioneer in finance at Biloxi, Mississippi.  He was a founder of the Biloxi branch of the Inter-State Building & Loan Association of Columbus, Georgia and the Bank of Biloxi. The local Inter-State Building & Loan Association was founded in December 1889 and the Bank of Biloxi was incorporated on December 26, 1892.(The Biloxi Herald, December 21, 1889, p. 4 and January 21, 1893, p. 4)

 

The founding fathers of the Bank of Biloxi were primarily the following Biloxi seafood packers and merchants: Lazaro Lopez, W.K.M. Dukate, Isidore Heidenheim, F.W. Elmer, J.T. Maybury, S. Picard, A.O. Bourdon Sr., B. Tucei, O.M. Nilson, H. Otto, W.H. Maybin, J.W. Maybin, W.A. White, Charles F. Theobald, Charles Redding, T.P. Dulion, Phil McCabe, John Walker, and E.J. Buck.  The first officers of the Bank of Biloxi were: C.F. Theobald, president; Lazaro Lopez, vice president; and E.J. Buck, cashier.(The Biloxi Herald, February 25, 1893, p. 8)

 

Seashore Academy

 The Seashore Academy, a private boy’s boarding school, was chartered in Mississippi in June 1893 by Laz Lopez, F.W. Elmer, S. Picard, John Walker, E.J. Buck, H.T. Greaves, E.W. Morrill, H. Otto, J.R. Harkness (1827-1903), George H. Dunbar, and F.B. Dunbar.  This educational institution was situated on the beach front at Biloxi about 500 feet west of the Biloxi Lighthouse.  It opened in September 1893 with Dr. George S. Roudebush (1829-1921), a Presbyterian minister, in charge.  Dr. Roudebush was born in Ohio.(Harrison Co., Mississippi Chattel Deed Bk. 1, p. 6 and The Biloxi Herald, July 1, 1893, p. 8)

 

Pass Christian Street residence-1890

The first residence of Lazaro Lopez on Pass Christian Street, now Howard Avenue, was erected commencing in January 1890 by John R. Harkness (1827-1903), local building contractor.  The $7000 structure was completed in May 1890 and described as ‘an ornament and credit to the enterprise of our beautiful city’.(The Biloxi Herald, January 18, 1890, p. 4, March 1, 1890, p. 4, April 26, 1890, p. 4)

 

The Lopez family residence on Pass Christian Street was destroyed by fire in November 1900.

 

Forest Park School

In early September 1898, the City of Biloxi was the recipient of three new public schools: the Back Bay Ward School was donated by W.K.M. Dukate and William Gorenflo; the Primary School situated on the corner of Main Street and Water Street given by Mayor Harry T. Howard; and the Forest Park School on Porter Avenue donated by Lazaro Lopez and Julia Dulion Lopez.(The Biloxi Daily Herald, September 10, 1898, p.4)

 

In February 1898, Lazaro Lopez acquired a large lot on the SW/C of Porter and Cemetery Street, now Irish Hill Drive, for $650 from J.S. Williams and O.S. Williams.  The Williams lot ran south from a point on Cemetery Street which was twelve feet west of Porter for one hundred ninety-five feet; thence west one hundred twenty-nine feet; thence north two hundred two feet; and then one hundred twenty-nine feet to the point of beginning on Cemetery Street.  There was a twelve-foot banquette or R-O-W on Porter which ran south for one hundred ninety-five feet.(Harrison Co., Mississippi Land Deed Bk. 37, p. 411)

 

From this tract formerly of Williams, Mr. Lopez donated to the City of Biloxi, the Forest Park School lot.  Its perimeter was described as being:  eighty-five feetsouth from a point on Cemetery Street which is twelve feet west of Porter; thence west for one hundred thirty feet; then north eighty-five feet; then east one hundred thirty feet to the point of beginning on Cemetery Street.  The Lopez deed required that this lot be used by the City of Biloxi for school purposes or other charitable functions or its title would revert back to the Lopez family.(Harrison Co., Mississippi Land Deed Bk. 39, p. 70)

 

It is interesting to note that Porter Street was still closed to the public as late as February 1890.  At this time, Biloxi’s Town Council postponed a petition for its opening.(The Biloxi Herald, February 8, 1890, p. 4)

 

After the demise of Lazaro Lopez in late September 1903, the land on Porter and Cemetery Street juxtaposed to the Forest Park School parcel was inherited by Erena Lopez, his daughter.(Harrison Co., Mississippi Will Bk. 3, p. 21)

 

West End School

In time, the Forest Park School became known as ‘the West End School’ because of its location on the western end of Biloxi.  It appears to have functioned as a school until the new Lopez School opened nearby on West Howard Avenue in 1924.  The City of Biloxi then utilized the building to house the Charles L. Baudry American Legion Post No. 33.  This organization formed in early November 1919, when fifty veterans of WWI met at the Maccabees Hall on West Howard Avenue and selected to honor U.S. Marine Corps Sergeant Charles L. Baudry (1891-1918), a New Orleans native and Biloxi resident who was killed in action at Chateau Thierry in France in October 1918.(The Daily Herald, December 7, 1918 and November 4, 1919, p. 1)

 

City of Biloxi

 During the 1943-1947, mayoral term of Chester A. Delacruz(1889-1964), Biloxi seafood packer, and City Clerk J.A. ‘Tony’ Creel (1901-1992), the City of Biloxi in January 1946, adopted a resolution to abandon and convey the West End School site and an additional lot contiguous to the school lot which it had purchased in June 1927 for $800.  The building on the parcel was valued at $700.   On January 21, 1946, the city of Biloxi sold to Julius M. Lopez and Noreta Lopez Yerger for $1500 the following tract on the SW/C of Porter and Cemetery Street: From the SW/C of Porter and Cemetery Street go 185 feet south along Porter; thence 175 feet west; thence 98 feet north; thence 51 feet west; thence 108 feet north; thence 226 feet along Cemetery Street to the point of beginning.  At the same time, Eurilda Seal Lopez, Teresa Lopez Folkes, Rowena Lopez Caldwell, and Arnaud Lopez gave Julius M. Lopez and Noreta Lopez Yerger a quitclaim deed on this tract.(Harrison Co., Mississippi Land Deed Bk. 283, p. 532 and p. 535)

 

Catholic Bishop Diocese of Natchez and Notre Dame

In early September 1943, Notre Dame High School, the first Catholic boy’s high school in Biloxi was commenced by Brothers from Notre Dame University with Reverend Brother Francis Borgia, CSC, as principal. Possession of the Dantzler House on West Beach near the Biloxi Lighthouse was taken by the Brothers on August 18, 1943.  Frank Leahy (1908-1973), legendary football coach of the Fighting Irish, attempted to find a football coach for the new school.  He worked with the Reverend Doctor Geoffrey O’Connell (1900-1976), superintendent of Catholic schools in Mississippi, to obtain a first class coach for the fledgling football squad.  One hundred twenty-five students enrolled in the new educational institution.(The Daily Herald, September 9, 1943, p. 7)  

 

In March 1946, Julius M. Lopez and Noreta Lopez Yerger for $1500 sold the West End School property to Richard O. Gerow, Bishop of the Catholic Diocese of Natchez for the use of the Nativity of the B.V.M. Parish.  Notre Dame utilized the old building for its Junior High School program, probably until it relocated to its new campus on the north end of Hopkins Boulevard in September 1953.  Here in a new $220,000 building Brother Rex, C.S.C and the principal, anticipated school to commence on September 14th  for grades seven through twelve.(Harrison Co., Mississippi Land Deed Bk. 283, p. 537and The Daily Herald, September 1, 1953, p. 1)

 

Delchamps

After the West End School site was rezoned in October 1954 by the Biloxi zoning board, Bishop R.O. Gerow sold the former school property to Delchamps Food Stores Inc., a Mobile, Alabama based retail food chain.  The consideration was $55,000.  One of the stipulations in the warranty deed was that ‘the old school building to be removed within sixty days’.  Delchamps was expected to erect a large food market here in the fall of 1955.  The Mobile based food chain anticipated total expenditures for their Biloxi store to be about $350,000, which included land acquisition, construction of a 16,000 square-foot store building, stock, equipment, and parking lot.(Harrison Co., Mississippi Land Deed Bk. 389, p. 272 and The Daily Herald, December 13, 1954, p. 1)

 

1897 Yellow Fever

The 1897 Biloxi Yellow Fever event was benign to the Lopez family as Laz, Julia and some of the older children had been infected at other times and were now immune.  Only, Julius M. Lopez (1886-1958), then a child, got the virus, but survived.(The Biloxi Herald, October 30, 1897, p. 1)

 

Political Career

Lazaro Lopez was elected Ward 3 Alderman at least twice during his short tenure in Biloxi's politics.  In April 1898, he donated a lot to the City of Biloxi to be utilized as a 'pound' or storage site for stock animals that were illegally roaming the street of Biloxi.  The City was required to fence the lot.(The Biloxi Daily Herald, April 9, 1898, p. 8)

 

1900 fire

In early November 1900, unarguably the worst fire in the long history of Biloxi commenced on the Kennedy property on the east side of Reynoir Street near the L&N Depot and swept southward to the beach.  Much commercial and residential property was totally destroyed and that of Lazaro Lopez, which was situated on Howard Avenue and Reynoir Street was inflicted the greatest damage.  It was estimated that the losses of Mr. Lopez would exceed $80,000.  After surveying his devastated properties, he stated that “ it was his intention at the earliest possible time to undertake the work of replacing the handsome structures destroyed with buildings no less ornamented.”(The Biloxi Daily Herald, November 11, 1900, p. 1)

 

LOPEZ HOME (1901-1920)-West Howard Avenue

 

New residence-1901

The handsome Lazaro Lopez residence was situated on the north side of West Howard Avenue between Reynoir Street and Croesus Street.  It was erected commencing in May 1901 following the great conflagration of early November 1900, unarguably the worst fire in the long history of Biloxi.  This destructive blaze commenced on the Kennedy property on the east side of Reynoir Street near the L&N Depot and swept southward to the beach.  Much commercial and residential property was totally destroyed and that of Lazaro Lopez, which was situated on West Howard Avenue and Reynoir Street was inflicted the greatest damage.  It was estimated that the losses of Mr. Lopez were in excess of $80,000.  After surveying his devastated properties, he stated that: “it was his intention at the earliest possible time to undertake the work of replacing the handsome structures destroyed with buildings no less ornamented.”(The Biloxi Daily Herald, November 11, 1900, p. 1)

 

The new, two-story, Lopez domicile was built upon the site of their fire ravished home.  It was designed and its construction supervised by Theo Brune (1854-1932), well-known New Orleans architect, and built by Barnes & Owens from Bedford Sandstone.  The roof was slate and adorned with a graceful and ornamental tower.  The house had fifteen rooms, an elegant reception and palatial reception and stair hall lighted by rich and rare art glass windows.  The Lopez family anticipated occupancy within six months of construction startup.(The Biloxi Herald, May 5, 1901, p. 1)

 

The Laz Lopez family residence on West Howard Avenue was demolished by the Heath Construction Company in June 1920.  It had been inherited by Noreta Lopez Rucks (1896-1960), his daughter, after the death of her mother, Julia Dulion Lopez (1857-1918), in June 1918.  Noreta Julia Lopez (1896-1960) was born at Biloxi, Mississippi on July 31, 1896.  She had married James Rucks Yerger II (1892-1931), called Rucks, who was born at Friars Point, Coahoma County, Mississippi.  After the demolition was completed, the Rucks built a modern, one-story, brick building with a plate glass front on the former Lopez homestead.  The Yerger Building had four rental spaces which were initially occupied by a haberdashery, grocery store, plumber, and dry goods merchant.(The Daily Herald, June 10, 1920, p. 6)

 

New L. Lopez & Company store building

Mr. Lopez was eager to erect a new mercantile and hardware store situated on the northeast corner of West Howard Avenue and Reynoir Street to replace his destroyed store and regain his market position in the thriving Biloxi economy.  By mid-November 1900, the burned Lopez store lot was virtually cleared on the rubbish and debris created by the recent fire.  In early January 1901, his Renaissance, architectural style, two-story, business house was one of the first buildings to rise in Biloxi’s badly burned commercial district.  Barnes & Owens were contracted to erect the W.T. Harkness, designed structure.  Theo Brune (1854-1932), well-known New Orleans architect, was hired to supervise construction of the 4500 square-foot structure to cost $10,000.  The T.J. Rosell Company built the counters, shelves, and interior fixtures.  The ceiling of both stories was made of steel.   Hempstead & Williams were hired for the interior and exterior decorating.  Mr. Lopez planned to vend fancy and staple groceries, hardware, shoes, ship chandelry from the first floor and lighter and bulky goods from the upper floor.(The Biloxi Herald, November 15, 1900, p. 8 and April 27, 1901, p. 8)

The new L. Lopez & Company building on Reynoir and Howard Avenue opened in late April.  Theo P. Dulion (1861-1907) was the store manager.(The Biloxi Daily Herald, April 27, 1901, p. 8)

 

Lazaro’s demise

Lazaro Lopez expired in Rome, Italy on September 25, 1903 as the result of an acute inflammation of his kidneys and dysentery.  He and Julia with four of their children, Erena Lopez, Rowena Lopez, Noreta Lopez and Master Julius Lopez, had departed  Biloxi, Mississippi via the L&N Railroad for NYC where they boarded the      for Europe.

Mr. Lopez had been ill at Biloxi before they left for Europe.  A telegram from Rome reached Biloxi on September 19, 1903 notifying his family here that he was seriously sick.(The Biloxi Herald, September 19, 1903, p. 8)

 

Return to Biloxi

On October 1, 1903,Julia Lopez and her children sadly boarded the Deutchland, a steamer, disembarking from Cherbourg, France for New York without their beloved Lazaro.  The body of Mr. Lopez was shipped several days later from France to Boston, Massachusetts aboard the Princess Irene.  The Lopez family reached New York City and was met by Arnaud Lopez.  The family left New York for Biloxi on October 7th without Julius Lopez who stayed behind with Arnaud, his older brother.  Lazaro’s brother, Manuel Lopez, a Havana merchant, accompanied them to Biloxi.  W.K.M. Dukate, a family friend and business associate, left Biloxi for New York City on October 8th to join Arnaud and Julius Lopez to escort Lazaro’s body home.(The Biloxi Daily Herald, October 1, 1903, p. 7, October 5, 1903, p. 8, October 8, 1903, p. 8, and October 9, 1903, p. 8) 

 

Lazaro’s funeral

The corporal remains of Lazaro Lopez arrived at Biloxi by train in the morning of October 17, 1903.  Biloxi began planning for Lazaro’s funeral on October 5th when Isidore Heidenheim (1852-1918), a prominent Biloxi seafood packer, called a meeting at the Firemen’s Hall.  It was decided that Mr. Lopez’s funeral would be held on Monday October 20th at 10:00 a.m. in Nativity B.V.M. with father Alphonse Kettels holding a requiem high mass.  All stores, banks, and other business houses were closed until after the funeral.(The Biloxi Daily Herald, October 6, 1903, p.1, October17, 1903, p. 1, October 19, 1903, p. 1

 

Lazaro Lopez’s body was escorted from the Lopez residence on West Howard Avenue to the Catholic church, a short distance, by Lazaro Lopez Jr., Arnaud Lopez, Julius Lopez, Manuel Lopez, Theo P. Dulion, and Arnaud M. Dulion.  After the high mass, the large Lopez funeral cortege left the church and proceeded west on West Howard Avenue to Cuevas Street.  Here it turned south to the Beach Road and then west again to the Biloxi Cemetery.  The order of the Lopez funeral procession was as follows: Biloxi Public School children; members of the Oystermen’s Protective Association; Commercial Club members; Ladies of the Sacred Heart Society, United Daughters of the Confederacy, and King’s Daughters; carriages carrying floral offerings; carriage of Father Kettels and his assistants; the Hearse accompanied by the pall bearers, honorary pall bearers, twelve young ladies dressed in white from the West End School; and finally carriages of the Lopez family followed by many carriages transporting friends and acquaintances of Lazaro Lopez to his final resting place in the Biloxi cemetery.(The Biloxi Daily Herald, October 19, 1903, p.1)

 

Pall bearers

Active pall bearers and honorary pall bearers selected for Mr. Lopez’s funeral read like a Who’s Who of Biloxi’s commercial and political community.  Pall bearers were: Phil Wachenfeld; Joesph Arguelles; John Wentzell; Joseph Rusk; August ‘Gus’ Barthes; and D.M. McCarroll.  The Lopez family selected as honorary pall bearers: W.K.M. Dukate; William F. Gorenflo Sr.; Captain John Walker; John C. Bradford; T.J. Rosell; William Buck; Florian Seal; George W. Young; Aristede Hopkins; George W. Grayson; John E. Morrison; and Walter A. White.(The Biloxi Daily Herald, October 19, 1903, p.1)

 

Business affiliations

 

Merchandising

L. Lopez & Company, T.P. Dulion

 

Banks

1st Vice-president and director of the Bank of Biloxi, Director of the Biloxi Savings Bank & Trust Company,

 

LAST WILL

As a brilliant businessman and successful investor, Lazaro Lopez had accumulated a vast amount of wealth from his seafood, mercantile, banking and other commercial enterprises.  His will dated June 24, 1903, legated the following to his spouse, children and sister:

  1.  The Lopez residence, store building, and all other improvements situated on the lot of land described as: north by Chiapella; east by Mrs. Lafour (sic); south by Howard Avenue; and west by Reynoir Street was left to Julia Dulion Lopez and at her death or marriage to be the property of Noreta Lopez, his daughter.
  2. To my beloved wife Julia, one thousand dollars of United Statesbonds.
  3. To my son Laz, these lots of land in the City of Biloxi: (1) one lot with improvements bounded on the north by First Street; east by Magnolia Street; south by the Gulf of Mexico; and west by the property of Julia Lopez.  (2) one lot bounded on the north by J. Arguellas (sic); easy by Chattam and Skinner; south by Frank Cavacovich (sic); and west by Oak Street having a front on Oak Street of one hundred and  twenty feet and extending east for two hundred and forty feet.
  4. To my son Laz, these lots of land in the City of Biloxi: (1) one lot with improvements bounded on the north by First Street; east by Magnolia Street; south by the Gulf of Mexico; and west by the property of Julia Lopez.  (2) one lot bounded on the north by J. Arguellas (sic); easy by Chattam and Skinner; south by Frank Cavacovich (sic); and west by Oak Street having a front on Oak Street of one hundred and  twenty feet and extending east for two hundred and forty feet.
  5. To my son Laz, my one-sixth interest in the canning factory, business and property of the firm of William Gorenflo and Company.  I also give Laz my one-half interest in the schooner Julia H.
  6. To my son Arnaud, the following land in the City of Biloxi: (1) lot and improvements bounded on the north by the Back Bay of Biloxi; east by Howard; and south and west by Bell.  (2) one lot bounded on the north by Howard       Avenue; east by W.K.M. Dukate; south by Mrs. Bohn; and west by an alley leading to the house of Mrs. Bohn.  (3) one lot bounded on the north by First Street; east by Mrs. Weems; south by Mrs. Maybury; and west by Oak Street.
  7.  To my son Arnaud, my one-half interest in the schooner Josiana.
  8.  To my son Julius, the following lot in Biloxi: north by Howard Avenue; east by Mrs. Bohn, Caillavet and Cassoux (sic); south by the Gulf of Mexico; and west by W.K.M. Dukate.
  9.   To Teresa Folkes, my daughter, my one-half interest in the following lot in Biloxi: north by Howard Avenue; east by Lafour (sic); south by Frank Voivedich; and west by Reynoir Street.
  10.  To Erena, my daughter, the following lots in Biloxi: (1) north by the West End School House; east by Porter Avenue; south and west by property formerly of Willliams.  (2) one-half interest in lot described as: north and west by Eistetter; east by  ; south by  ; and west by     .  (3) one lot bounded on the north  by Jens Neilsen; on the east by Lazarus Seymour;  south by Seymour heirs; and west by Fayard Street.  (4) one-half interest in the tract known as the Parkhurst Place with the Back Bay of Biloxi to the north; east by fractional Section 20, T7S-R9W; and west by the Naval Reserve Park lands and those of August Ohr and Alex Evans.
  11. To my daughter Rowena the following lots in Biloxi: (1) one-half interest in the lot bounded on the north by an alley; east by Joe Tucei; south by Howard Avenue; and west by Delauney Street. (2) one lot with improvements [T.P. Dulion Mercantile Building] described as: north by Kornman; east by Reynoir Street; south by Howard Avenue; and west by Seymour Heirs.
  12. To Erena, Rowena, and Noreta, my daughters, to share and share alike the following land in Biloxi: one lot fronting Chartres Street on the north; east by Coueve (sic) Street; south by the right-of-way of the L&N Railroad; and west by the land of the Caillavet heirs.
  13. To my beloved wife Julia and son Arnaud to share like and like: my interest in the grocery and hardware business, property, and assets of L. Lopez & Company.
  14. To my sons Laz and Arnaud to share and share alike: my one-fourth interest in sash, door and blind factory, business, property and assts of the firm T.J. Rosell & Company.
  15. To Laz, Arnaud, and Julius, my sons, to share and share alike: (1) my interest in the canning factory, business, property and assts of every kind in the firm of  Lopez & Dukate. (2) my stock in the Neptune Canning Company of Neptune in the State of Louisiana. (3) my stock in the Louisiana Oyster Company of Rigolets in the State of Louisiana. (4) all boats and floating property and undivided interest in any boats or floating property of which I may died possessed and herein specifically bequeathed. 
  16. To all my children whether over or under the age of twenty-one years and whether married or single to share and share alike all bonds of every kind  that I may die possessed,exceptUnited States bonds.
  17. To all my children whether over or under the age of twenty-one years and whether married or single to share and share alike all of the corporation stock, not otherwise specifically bequeathed of which I might possess when I die.  As far as the stock in each corporation can be apportioned among my children so as to give the same number of shares in such corporation without dividing any shares.
  18. To my four sisters, Mary, Johanna, Felicita, and Clara, I give each two thousand dollars.
  19. I direct my executors to pay all my just debts from cash on hand in banks and life insurance policies before distribution thereof is made.
  20. To my beloved wife Julia, I bequeath all the remainder of my property real and personal of every kind, character, and description wherever so situated.
  21. I appoint William Gorenflo and W.K.M. Dukate, as executors of this my last will and testament, and direct that they shall not be required to give bond as such executors.
  22. I appoint Arnaud Lopez, my son, as guardian for my minor children and direct that he shall not have to give bond as such guardian, nor be required to file vouchers with his reports or annual accounts and that he shall not be chargeable with any interest on the personal assets of such wards in his hands but shall be chargeable with the corpus and actual income from such estates.
  23. In case any one or more of my children contest the validity of this will or resist its due execution, such child or children shall there by forfeit all right to take under this will, the title to the property herein devised or bequeathed to such child or children shall there by vest in my other children, share and share alike.

Lazaro Lopez, June 24, 1903.

 

Nativity B.V.M. Roman Catholic Church

Lazaro Lopez and his family were congregants of the Nativity of the Blessed Virgin Mary Roman Catholic Church, which was situated a few blocks west of their domicile on West Howard Avenue between Fayard Street and Caillavet Street.  The Lopez children were baptized here and several were married in this sanctuary.  Like most of the Lopez structures, Nativity B.V.M. was destroyed by the Great Fire of November 1900.  Laz Lopez, W.K.M. Dukate, Ernest Desporte, Phil McCabe, Ed Glennan, and Louis Gill were the building committee responsible for erecting a new church.  A contract was let in early February 1902 to J.F. Barnes & Company of Greenville, Mississippi and Biloxi to build the Theo Brune (1854-1932) designed Gothic structure.  The new church was erected on the site of the former sanctuary and was estimated to cost over $16,000.  It was sixty-feet tall, had a bell tower one hundred ten-feet in height and was fifty-five in width and one hundred thirty-two feet deep.(The Biloxi Daily Herald, February 8, 1902, p. 9)

 

In mid-September, Bishop Heslin blessed and christened the new church bell at the Church of the Nativity BVM donated by Lazaro Lopez.  Father Blanc of Bay St. Louis, Father Aloysius of Pass Christian, and Reverend Alphonse Kettels of Biloxi assited Bishop Heslin with the blessing.  The bell was given in the name of Clara Josephine Lopez and sponsored by her siblings, Master Julius Lopez and Miss Rowena Lopez.(The Biloxi Daily Herald, September 16, 1902)

 

In early January 1906, seven, large, stain glass windows arrived at Biloxi from Germany to tbe placed in the sanctuary of the Nativity B.V.M. Catholic Church.  Julia Dulion Lopez had donated these windows described as 'equal to anything in the South' in memory of her late husband.  Frederick Thornley of New York was employed to install the windows designed and built by Reis and Reis of Munich, Germany.(The Biloxi Daily Herald, January 6, 1906, p. 4 and  January 9, 1906, p. 1)

 

 

The Airdome-1909

The Airdome, an open air movie and vaudeville venue, opened April 19, 1909 on the Lopez property west of the T.P. Dulion Mercantile Company.  It was one hundred twenty-two feet by one hundred-forty feet and was bounded by Fayard Street on the west; Howard Avenue on the south; and Reynoir Street on the east.  It was fenced and had one hundred twenty-five benches capable of seating eight people and two hundred-fifty chairs giving it a seating capacity of 1250 people.  There was a stage and ‘picture machine box’, probably the projector.  Harry Haise (1854-1954) did the carpentry work to erect the Airdome.  The newly formed Daily Herald Band under the direction of Professor Joseph Dowling performed on opening day.  Frederick P. Abbley (1882-1941) was the manager.(The Daily Herald, April 13, 1909 and April 20, 1909, p. 2)

 

Rowena Lopez Caldwell, inherited the lot known as “the Airdome” from Julia Dulion Lopez, her mother in late June 1918.

 

Julia Lopez expires

Julia Dulion Lopez (1857-1918) was born May 25, 1857.  Upon her demise on June 30, 1918, she was lauded by The Daily Herald as: "A devout Catholic, a faithful and devoted wife and mother, a kind and thoughtful neighbor and true friend, and a woman of the most generous charity and tender solicitude for suffering everywhere, her many acts of of charity being remembered in the community."  Mrs. Lopez was the last to expire of her Dulion family.  She was survived by her beautiful daughters all residents of Biloxi: Theresa Lopez Folkes, wife of Dr. H.M. Folkes; Erena Lopez Brady, wife of Edward Brady, a prominent jeweler; Rowena Lopez Caldwell, spouse of Phil Caldwell whose husband is in the US Army; and Noreta Lopez Yerger, wife of Rucks Yerger Jr., formerly of Gulfport and now in the insurance business at Biloxi.  Julia's sons, Lazaro Lopez, Arnaud Lopez, and Julius Lopez, had inherited their father's acumen for commercial enterprises and made their livelihoods at Biloxi as merchants and factorymen.  Julia Dulion Lopez was also survived by fifteen grandchildren.  She had lost three children before her demise: Clara Lopez, Josephine Lopez and Juanita Lopez. Her funeral was held at Nativity BVM Catholic Church on July 2, 1918 with internment in the Biloxi Cemetery.  The Bradford Undertaking Company provided funeral arrangements for the Lopez family.(The Daily Herald, July 1, 1918. p. 1)

 

Julia’s Legacy

Julia Dulion Lopez died at Biloxi, Mississippi on June 30, 1918.  Before her demise, she had appointed Erena Lopez Brady, as executrix, of her estate without bonding.  Her bequests were as follows:

  1. To Noreta Lopez Yerger, my daughter, the property corner of Lameuse Street and Howard Avenue occupied by Kimbrough, Quint & Caillavet.
  2. To Arnaud Lopez, my son, the two lots known as ‘two lots Summerville addition to Biloxi’.
  3. To Julius Lopez, my son, the lot in the L.A. Frederick Survey.
  4. To Rowena Lopez Caldwell, my daughter, the lot known as “the Airdome”.
  5. To Teresa Lopez Folkes, my daughter, the Rodenberg Survey lot.
  6. To Erena Lopez Brady, my daughter, the house and lot on the corner of Howard Avenue and Seal.
  7. To Arnaud Lopez a one-third interest in the Houma, Louisiana lot.
  8. To Julius Lopez a one-third interest in the Coast Livery Lot in Gulfport.
  9. To Lazaro Lopez a lot in Mobile, Alabama with the 1916 Tax Receipt No. 9957.
  10. To Noreta Lopez Yerger the Lopez home on West Howard Avenue and the Corner Store on Howard Avenue and Reynoir Street previously bequeathed to Norita Lopez Yerger by her father and whatever interest I have in these properties.
  11. To Erena Lopez Brady all of my stock in the T.P. Dulion Mercantile Company.
  12. To all of my daughters all of my stock in the L. Lopez & Company to be divided equally.
  13. ToArnaud Lopez all my stock in the Columbia Ice & Power Company.
  14. To Lazaro Lopez all my stock in the Louisiana Navigation & Fishing Company.
  15. To my seven children and Josephine Folkes all of my stock in the Interstate Bank & Trust Company of New Orleans to be divided equally.
  16. To my seven children all of my stock in the First National Bank of Biloxi excepting one share for Josephine Folkes, my granddaughter.
  17. To my seven children all of my stock in the Artesian Ice Company excepting one share for Josephine Folkes, my granddaughter.
  18. To my seven children all of my stock in the Gulfport & Mississippi Coast Traction Company to be divided equally.
  19. To Constance Lewis, my faithful servant, one hundred dollars in cash and to Theresa Lambricht the sum of twenty-five dollars.

Julia Lopez, June 29, 1918.

 

Strand Theatre

Norita Lopez Yergerhad inherited the large Lopez lot on the northeast corner of Howard Avenue and Reynoir Street.  In January 1925, she made a five year lease with Julian H. Saenger (1873-1932) of the Gulf Coast Amusement Company to rent the building formerly housing the L. Lopez & Company store at 418 Howard Avenue as the Strand Theatre.  The rent was $250 per month.  On May 22, 1926, a fire on the adjacent property did some damage to the Strand Theatre and the movie house was shut down for repairs by the lessor.  The lease was renegotiated after the fire and compromised and the lessee agreed to a monthly rental rate of $325 each month until January 31, 1930, then it would be increased to $425 per month.(Harrison Co., Mississippi Land Deed Bk. 162, p. 232)

 

Saenger Theatre

Norita Lopez Yerger inherited the large Lopez lot on the northeast corner of Howard Avenue and Reynoir Street.  In March 1928, she and Rucks Yerger Jr., her spouse, granted a thirty years lease to.(Harrison Co., Mississippi Land Deed Bk. 20, p. 459)

 

Julian H. Saenger

Julian Henri Saenger (1873-1932) was born in Norfolk, Virginia to Rabbi Israel Saenger (1841-1900+), an 1866 immigrant from Germany, and Mrs. Saenger (d. pre-1900) also a German immigrant.  Julian graduated from Johns Hopkins University at Baltimore, Maryland after completing their pharmacy school.  Before 1900, the Saenger family relocated from Macon, Georgia to Shreveport, Louisiana where he was a retail pharmacist and proprietor of the Saenger Drug Company with Abe D. Saenger (1876-1932+), his brother.(1900 Caddo Parish, Louisiana Federal Census T623_560, p. 4B, ED 40)

 

In 1911, Julian H. Saenger joined with Levi Maurice Ash (1880-1971), who had married Florence Saenger Ash (1886-1932+), his sister, and Abe D. Saenger, his brother, to organized the Saenger Amusement Company.  They opened their first movie house in Shreveport, also in 1911.  In 1917, the company had built the Strand Theatre at New Orleans and in November 1926.  With their two hundred movies houses in fifty Southern cities, in eleven Southern states, and Central America and Cuba, Saenger Theatres, Inc. was integrated into Publix Theaters Corporation, the premier American movie house proprietor, whose crown jewel was the seven million dollar Paramont Theater on Broadway.   The two and one-half million dollar Saenger Theatre opened in the Crescent City on February 4, 1927.  It was designed by Emile Weil.

 

Julian H. Saenger married Marjorie Kent Weston at Gretna, Louisiana in December 1930.  They were domiciled at 831 Bourbon Street.  Julian was stricken by a heart attack on February 6, 1932.  He expired in an ambulance rushing him to a New Orleans hospital.(The Times Picayune, December 20, 1930, p. 20 and February 6, 1932, p. 1)  

 

REFERENCES:

Books

The Biloxi Daily Herald, Business and Professional Men, (The Biloxi Daily Herald: Biloxi, Mississippi-1902).

The Daily Herald 50th Golden Jubilee Number Biographical and Historical 1884-1934, (The Daily Herald: Gulfport-Biloxi, Mississippi-1934).

Charles L. Dyer, Along The Gulf, (Women of the Trinity Episcopal Church:  Pass Christian, Mississippi-1971, originally published 1895).

Jerome Lepre, Catholic Church Records Diocese of Biloxi, Mississippi, Volume I, (Catholic Dioceses of Biloxi: Biloxi, Mississippi-1991).

Twentieth Century Coast Edition of the Biloxi Daily Herald: Historical and Biographical (George W. Wilkes & Sons: Biloxi-1902).

Chancery Court

Harrison County, Mississippi Chancery Court Cause No. 683, “Eulalie Clark v. V.J. Olivari”-1895.

Harrison County, Mississippi Chancery Court Cause No. , “The Estate of Lazaro Lopez”-June 1903

Harrison County, Mississippi Chancery Court Cause No. 1663, “The Estate of Julia Dulion Lopez”-1918

Harrison County, Mississippi Chancery Court Cause No. 35188, “”-December 1954

Harrison County, Mississippi Chancery Court 2nd Judicial District, Cause No. 9853, “The Estate of Lynden Bowring, 1980.

Harrison County, Mississippi Chancery Court 2nd Judicial District Cause No. P-2077B, The Estate of Beverly Lopez Berggren”, March 1993.

Jackson County, Mississippi Chancery Court Cause No. 33,566, “The Estate of Wilda Lopez Bowring”, ?

Journals

The Baltimore Sun, “Charles Patten”, January 13, 1922.

The Biloxi-D’Iberville Press, “Time Traveler-Biloxi’s Air Dome Theater, February 25, 2010.

The Biloxi Herald,“Local News”, October 27, 1888.

The Biloxi Herald,“Local and Personal Notes”, November 16, 1889.

The Biloxi Herald,“Local and Personal Notes”, January 18, 1890.

The Biloxi Herald,“The Town Council”, February 8, 1890.

The Biloxi Herald,“Local and Personal Notes”, March 1, 1890.

The Biloxi Herald,“Local and Personal Notes”, March 8, 1890.

The Biloxi Herald,“Local Happenings”, April 26, 1890.

The Biloxi Herald,“Local Happenings”, May 17, 1890.

The Biloxi Herald,“Local Happenings”, June 28, 1890.

The Biloxi Herald,“Local Happenings”, November 22, 1890.

The Biloxi Herald, “Biloxi Chief Industry”, September 12, 1892.

The Biloxi Herald,“Bank of Biloxi”, January 7, 1893.

The Biloxi Herald,“The Charter of Incorporation of the Bank of Biloxi”, January 21, 1893.

The Biloxi Herald,“Bank of Biloxi”, February 25, 1893.

The Biloxi Herald,“Bank of Biloxi”, April 1, 1893.

The Biloxi Herald, “Local Happenings”, July1, 1893.

The Biloxi Herald, “Local Happenings”, June 16, 1894.

The Biloxi Herald,“”,

The Biloxi Daily Herald

The Biloxi Herald,“City News”, October 30, 1897.

The Biloxi Herald, “Death of young Henzelena”, November 6, 1897.

The Biloxi Herald, “City Council”, April 9, 1898.

The Biloxi Herald, “Latest City News”, April 9, 1898.

The Biloxi Herald, “Latest City News”, May 18, 1898.

The Biloxi Herald,“Lopez’s New Building”, August 20, 1898.

The Biloxi Daily Herald,“Biloxi’s Public School System”, September 10, 1898.

The Biloxi Daily Herald,“Local and Personal”, November 10, 1899.

The Biloxi Daily Herald,“Oyster dredging”, February 4, 1900.

The Biloxi Daily Herald,“City News”, April 27, 1900.

The Biloxi Daily Herald,“Aftermath”, November 11, 1900.

The Biloxi Daily Herald,“City News”, November 15, 1900.

The Biloxi Daily Herald, “A beautiful block”, April 27, 1901.

The Biloxi Daily Herald,“Contract let”, May 5, 1901.

The Biloxi Daily Herald,“City News”, May 5, 1901.

The Biloxi Daily Herald,“”,

The Biloxi Daily Herald,“Contract let”, February 8, 1902.

The Biloxi Daily Herald,“Confirmation”, September 16, 1902.

The Biloxi Daily Herald,“L. Lopez Sr. ill”, September 19, 1903.

The Biloxi Daily Herald,“Mr. Lopez’s condition”, September 22, 1903.

The Biloxi Daily Herald,“News from Lopez Sr.”, September 25, 1903.

The Biloxi Daily Herald,“Prepare for worst”, September 25, 1903.

The Biloxi Daily Herald, “L. Lopez, Sr., Dead”, September 26, 1903.

The Biloxi Daily Herald, “The death of Mr. Lopez”, September 26, 1903.

The Biloxi Daily Herald, “City Items”, October 1, 1903.

The Biloxi Daily Herald,“Personal”, October 5, 1903.

The Biloxi Daily Herald,“Mass Meeting”, October 6, 1903.

The Biloxi Daily Herald,“City Items”, October 7, 1903.

The Biloxi Daily Herald,“City Items”, October 8, 1903.

The Biloxi Daily Herald,“City Items”, October 9, 1903.

The Biloxi Daily Herald,“City Items”, October 15, 1903.

The Biloxi Daily Herald,“In the shadow”, October 17, 1903.

The Biloxi Daily Herald,“Laid to rest”, October 19, 1903.

The Biloxi Daily Herald, “Biloxi’s building boom”, November 20, 1905.

The Biloxi Daily Herald, “City News”, January 6, 1906.

The Biloxi Daily Herald, “A beautiful donation”, January 9, 1906.

The Daily Herald

The Daily Herald,“Airdome”, April 1, 1909.

The Daily Herald,“Band to open Airdome”, April 13, 1909.

The Daily Herald,“Dunbars, Lopez, and Dukate Company [advertisement], September 29, 1909.

The Daily Herald, “Officers elected in big concern [Columbia Ice and Power Company], January 18, 1910.

The Daily Herald,“Improvements for factories”, July 20, 1911.

The Daily Herald, “Yerger-Lopez”, January 26, 1917, p. 6.

The Daily Herald,“Mrs. Julia Lopez passes away”, July 1, 1918.

The Daily Herald, “Girl of Southern Noted Family Joins Husband in Los Angeles”, September 6, 1919.

The Daily Herald,“Obituary [Charles L. Baudry], December 7, 1918.

The Daily Herald,“Biloxi Post”, November 4, 1919.

The Daily Herald,“Route of parade Thursday named”, November 25, 1919.

The Daily Herald,“Lopez home to be demolished”, January 22, 1920.

The Daily Herald,“Biloxi home is being torn down”, June 10, 1920.

The Daily Herald, “Juliani is erecting steel”, August 28, 1926, p. 2.

The Daily Herald, “Break ground for New Saenger House”,July 14, 1928.

The Daily Herald, “Saenger has new manager”,December 31, 1929.

The Daily Herald, “Yerger Building purchased by Mr. and Mrs. Ed Barq”, April 21, 1938, p. 1.

The Daily Herald,“Notre Dame opens with 125 enrollment”, September 9, 1943.

The Daily Herald,“Notre Dame to open new Biloxi School Sept. 14”, September 1, 1953.

The Daily Herald,“Delchamps will open new store in ‘55”, December 13, 1954.

The Daily Herald, “Mrs. Wilda Lopez Bowring”, October 27, 1977.

The Times-Picayune, “New Saenger Theater is vast beyond belief and incredibly beautiful”, February 5, 1927.

The Times-Picayune, “Theater is seen as realization of years of work”, February 5, 1927.

The Times-Picayune, “Society”, December 20, 1930.

The Times-Picayune, “Julian H. Saenger stricken, dies on way to hospital”, 7. 1932.

The Jackson County Times, “Local News Interests”,April 20, 1918, p. 5.

The Ocean Springs Record, “Marjory Yerger Winklejohn”, June 27, 2002.

The Pascagoula Democrat-Star, “Local Paragraphs”, December 30, 1881.

The Pascagoula Democrat-Star, “Wanted---Figs”, June 19, 1891.

__________________________________________________________________________________________________

 

LOPEZ CHILDREN

Teresa Lopez Folkes (1873-1951)

 

TERESA LOPEZ FOLKES

Teresa Lopez (1873-1951) was born at Biloxi, Mississippi on September 12, 1873.  On June 14, 1900, she married Dr. Hyman McMaken Folkes (1871-1926) in the Nativity B.V.M. Catholic Church at Biloxi.  Reverend Alphonse Ketels officiated.  William Wachenfeld served as Dr. Folkes best man and Miss Lopez was attended by Erena Lopez, May Young, and Jennie Gillen.  Miss Augusta Folkes (b. 1878), the sister of Dr. Folkes came from Jackson for the wedding.(The Biloxi Daily Herald, June 5, 1900, p. 8 and Harrison Co., Mississippi MRB 12, p. 321)

 

Hyman M. Folkes

Dr. H.M. Folkes was born on October 6, 1871 at Bovina, Warren County, Mississippi, the son of August Albert Folkes (1839-1904) and Anna E. Hilzheim (1850-1880+).  August A. Folkes was a Civil War veteran having served with the 1st Mississippi Regiment Light Artillery.  In 1877, the Folkes family settled at Jackson, Mississippi.  Here, August A. Folkes managed a hotel before he became a lumber agent representing J.C. Redus and vending dressed and rough lumber and building materials such as, shingles, lathing, sash and doors.  In late 1903, Captain A.A. Folkes became ill and was brought to Biloxi and put in the Biloxi Sanatorium under his son’s care.  He died on January 2, 1904 at Biloxi and his corporal remains were sent to Jackson for internment.  Mr. Folkes had been a vestryman at St. Andrew;s Episcopal Church in Jackson.(1880 Hinds Co., Mississippi federal Census T9-648, p. 13, ED 3, The Clarion Ledger, May 2, 1889, p. 6, The  Biloxi Daily Herald, December 29, 1903, p. 6 and January 2, 1904, p. 8

 

Before Hyman M. Folkes became a medical man, he Dr. Folkes was a 1893 graduate of Tulane.

 

Ship Island-Cat Island Quarantine Station

In the spring of 1897, Dr. Hyman McMacken Folkes (1871-1926) came to Biloxi from Jackson, Mississippi to accept the post of Quarantine Officer at Ship Island.  His initial appearance in the community left one with the impression that Dr. Folkes was a refined, social gentleman.  At this time, there appears to be some transitioning of the location of the Quarantine Station.  In late July 1896, the Quarantine Station was relocated to Cat Island and Dr. W.C. Brooke of Biloxi appointed to the post.(The Biloxi Herald, May 22, 1897, p. 8, July 25, 1896, p. 1)

 

Yellow Fever

Dr. Folkes earned the respect and admiration of Biloxians in the fall of 1897, when he was ordered from Cat Island to Biloxi by the State Board of Health to assist those struck down by yellow f1ever.  His youth, experience with yellow fever patients in the tropics and stamina allowed Dr. Folkes to work long, hours and provide efficient and effective service to so many at Biloxi in constant demand of medical attention.  In the fall of 1897, Dr. Folkes was sent to McHenry, Mississippi to work with the affirmed there as Dr. McHenry was ill. (The Biloxi Herald, October 30, 1897, p. 1)

 

Ship Island Tale

In July 1937, Captain L. Peter Eskald (1856-1944), a retired Danish immigrant and former Biloxi chandelier and boatman, related to a reporter forThe Daily Herald that when the Government sold all the armament and munitions on Ship Island to a Mr. Marks, a New Orleans junk dealer, he acquired in a trade from Mr. Marks the large Rodman gun at Fort Massachusetts for returning all of Marks’ tools and dynamite to the Crescent City.  Knowing that Dr. Folkes was a collector of historic objects, Captain Eskald offered him the Rodman for $600.  Dr. Folkes considered the price and subsequent removal and transfer to Biloxi very dear and passed on the Rodman.  The Rodman remained at Fort Massachusetts and has become an integral part of the Civil War history of Ship Island.(The Daily Herald, July 8, 1937)

 

By 1899, he had opened an office in Biloxi on Pass Christian Road, now Howard Avenue, in the Eistetter Building and advertised as follows:

 

DR. H.M. FOLKES

Office and rooms in Eistetter Building

Telephone 38    Office Hours 11 to 1

Biloxi, Mississippi

Accounts due on the first of each month

(The Biloxi Daily Herald, April 24, 1899, p. 8)

 

Children: Josephine Lopez Folkes (1901-1959) m. Albert Brown Russ (1888-1953) and Thomas Burns (1892-1974); Anna Odenal Folkes (1907-1968) m. Eugene Robert Kelly (1902-1990); and Dorothy Hilzheim Folkes (1912-1925).

 

Folkes & Kennedy

At the turn of the 20th Century and shortly thereafter, Biloxi was fortunate to have an adequate number of pharmacists and drug dispensaries.  Among those in this industry were: The Opera Pharmacy of Joseph W. Swetman (1863-1937); William P. Kennedy (1873-1951); The Phoenix Pharmacy of J.B. Lemon (1862-1919); The   of Herman Nill (1863-1904); Kimbrough & Pippen of Fenton H. Kimbrough (1874-1952) who later owned Kimbrough & Quints; and Jules A. D’Aquin (1877-1936). 

 

Dr. H.M. Folkes first ventured in the drugstore business in May 1901 in a partnership with W.P. Kennedy.  Their pharmacy was located in the new, two-story brick building of Lopez & Company on the southeast corner of West Howard Avenue and Reynoir Street.  When Mr. Kennedy’s health became poor, he retired from his pharmacy and Dr. Folkes partnered with W.J. Grant.(The Biloxi Daily Herald, May 5, 1901, p. 1 and )

 

Folkes & Grant

The Folkes & Grant ‘Century Drug Store’ was a retail drugstore instituted in the summer of 1901 by Dr. H.M. Folkes and W.J. Grant.  In 1900, W.J. Grant was a resident of Pascagoula and employed as a drug clerk in that city.  He came to Biloxi in 1900 to work in the pharmacy of W.P. Kennedy.  Their joint venture in Biloxi was situated in the same space as the short-lived Folkes & Kennedy venture.

 

 In late July 1901, a large engine and generator supplied by the Blakeslee Manufacturing Company of Birmingham, Alabama was installed in the rear of the Century Drugstore.  This dynamo generated electricity for the lighting of the drugstore, the adjoining barbershop, and for the large Lopez & Company across the street. There was also sufficient current to operate electric fans in these venues.(1900 Jackson Co., Mississippi Federal Census T623_812, p. 6A, ED 40 and The Biloxi Daily Herald, July 19, 1901, p. 8, July 25, 1901, p. 8, July 28, 1901, p. 8)

 

1903        

[see The Biloxi Daily Herald, October 3, 1903, p. 6)

 

W.J. Grant

William Jesse Grant (1875-1932) was born at Pascagoula, Mississippi the son of Robert B. Grant (1852-1932) and Lydia S. Landridge (1852-1909).  On April 16, 1902 at New Orleans, William J. Grant married Julia Elizabeth Baltar (1880-1968), the daughter of Jacinto F. Baltar (1834-1898) and Margaretha Gondolf (1840-1932).  They were the parents of: Marguerite Baltar Grant (1904-1988) m. Henry Baldwin Curtis; William Jesse Grant II (1906-1976) m. Mary Griffin Dantzler (1905-1988); and Leslie Baltar Grant (1908-1986) m. Vera ‘Bede’ Leola Dukate Bond (1909-1989).

 

Grant’s Drug Company

William J. Grant and Dr. Folkes parted ways about 1904 and this appears to be Dr. Folkes last pharmacy venture.  W.J. Grant joined with Jules A. D’Aquin (1877-1936), a native of New Orleans and Tulane pharmacy graduate, to form Grant & D’Aquin.  Mr. D’Aquin would leave Grant and join the staff of J.W. Swetman as a prescription clerk before acquiring the drugstore of J.B. Lemon in January 1910.  D’Aquin’s drugstore was located on the southeast corner of Howard Avenue and Lameuse Street.  In the spring of 1929, Grant’s opened in their new store adjacent to the Saenger Theatre.  W.J. Grant was assisted in his pharmacy by his son, W.J. Grant Jr. (1906-1976).(The Daily Herald, January 14, 1910, p. 8 and The Jackson County Times, June 22, 1929, p. 3)

 

After the demise of W.J. Grant, the family incorporated the business in October 1932.  The incorporators of Grant’s Drug Company Incorporated were: Mrs. W.J. Grant, Mrs. Henry B. Curtis, W.J. grant Jr. and Leslie B. Grant.  Grant’s remained on West Howard Avenue and Reynoir in the former Lopez-Yerger Building, which became the Barq’s Building in 1940??(Harrison Co., Mississippi Chattel Deed Bk. 52, p. 441)           

 

SeashoreAcademy

The Seashore Academy was a private school founded in June 1893 by Laz Lopez, F.W. Elmer, S. Picard, John Walker, E.J. Buck, H.T. Graves, E.W. Morrill, H. Otto, J.R. Harkness, George H. Dunbar, and F.B. Dunbar.  This private educational institution was situated about 500 feet west of the Biloxi Lighthouse.  It opened in September 1893 with Dr. George S. Roudebush (1829-1921), a Presbyterian minister, in charge.(Harrison Co., Mississippi Chattel Deed Bk. 1, p. 6 and The Biloxi Herald, July 1, 1893, p. 8)  

 

Biloxi Sanatorium

The Biloxi Sanatorium was chartered in Mississippi in June 1902 by Dr. H.M. Folkes, Laz Lopez, W.K.M. Dukate, Harry T. Howard (1856-1930), Judge James H. Nevlle (1852-1919), and Dr. M. Lyle. Talbot (1874-1937).  Its purpose was the treatment and care of the sick and disabled.  The Biloxi Sanatorium proposed to have a department for marine patients as well as regular patients.  The charter for the Biloxi Sanatorium was amended in January 1903 in order “to have the power and authority to open and maintain a school for training nurses and awarding diplomas.”(Harrison Co., Mississippi Chattel Deed Bk. 5, p. 73 and Bk. 419 and The Biloxi Herald, June 22,1902, p. 8)

 

The Biloxi Sanatorium was situated on the beach front site of the former Seashore Academy which had been instituted in June 1893 by Laz Lopez, F.W. Elmer, S. Picard, John Walker, E.J. Buck, H.T. Graves, E.W. Morrill, H. Otto, J.R. Harkness, George H. Dunbar, and F.B. Dunbar.  This private educational institution was situated about 500 feet west of the Biloxi Lighthouse.  It opened in September 1893 with Dr. George S. Roudebush (1829-1921), a Presbyterian minister, in charge.(Harrison Co., Mississippi Chattel Deed Bk. 1, p. 6 and The Biloxi Herald, July 1, 1893, p. 8)


 

Miss Mary H. Trigg

Mary H. Trigg (1874-1930+), who had worked in Manhattan as a nurse at the New York Hospital before 1900, came to the Biloxi Sanatorium from Greenville, Mississippi in November 1904.  She was a Mississippi native and daughter of Wyndham Trigg (1834-pre- 1910), a lawyer, and Nannie S. Trigg (1837-1910+), natives of Virginia and Mississippi respectively.  In 1906, Miss Trigg left Biloxi for the Greenville Sanatorium which she had acquired.  Miss Trigg was a guest of the Dr. and Mrs. Folkes at Gunston Hall in late October 1922.  By 1930, Miss Trigg was Superintendent of the King’s Daughters Hospital in Greenville.(The Biloxi Daily Herald, November 21, 1904, p. 5, The Daily Herald, October 31, 1922, p. 3 and 1900 New York, Co. New York Federal Census T623_111, p. 3A, ED 1066 and 1930 Washington Co., Mississippi Federal Census R 1156, p. 27A, ED 9)

Susie Trigg (1870-1930+), a sister of Nurse Mary H. Trigg, taught school at Greenville, Mississippi for many years and was honored by having an elementary school named in her honor in that Delta city.  Thomas K. Trigg (1878-1910+), her brother, worked for the Marine Hospital Service as a quarantine guard for trains entering and departing Biloxi was stricken with yellow fever in October 1905.(1910 and 1930 Washington Co., Mississippi T624_763, p. 13A, Ed 117 and R 1171, p. 3A, ED 8 and The Biloxi Herald, October 7, 1905, p. 4)

 

Folkes & Talbot

In August 1902, Dr. M. Lyle Talbot (1874-1937), the brother of Dr. William O. Talbot (1873-1952), a Biloxi dentist and politician, joined with Dr. H.M. Folkes to form a co-partnership.  Dr. M.L. Talbot was born in Scott County, Mississippi in September 1873 to Green W. Talbot (1848-1900+), a farmer, and Fannie Talbot (1852-1903), both natives of Alabama.  In 1900, Dr. Talbot was stationed at Ship Island, probably as the Quarantine Officer.  Peter Clarisse (1845-1932) was the lighthouse keeper on Ship Island at this time. (The Biloxi Herald, February 20, 1903, p. 6, 1900 Harrison Co., Mississippi Federal Census T623_808, p. 10A, ED 29 and 1880 Scott Co., Mississippi Federal Census T9_663, p. 15, Beat 4)

 

Pavilion

John Liddie, designer and builder, was hired by the Biloxi Sanatarium to erect a three-decked pavilion at the end of their pier.  The upper story had a glass enclosed room that was conducive for patients to sun bathe out of the elements.  The second floor featured lounge chairs and hammocks, while the pier level was conducive for children to crab and fish.  The pavilion was built with creosoted pilings and iron bars.(The Biloxi Daily Herald, September 18,1903, p. 6)

 

Biloxi Marine Hospital

Dr. Folkes advertised in the Biloxi Daily Herald that he contacted to take vessels and that surgery was his specialty.(The Biloxi Daily Herald, April 9, 1903, p. 6)

 

The April 1904 conflagration

The Biloxi Sanatarium of Dr. Hyman M. Folkes (1871-1926) was opened on November 24, 1904.  The Laz Lopez medical and surgical clinic for the poor would be maintained here.(The Biloxi Daily Herald, November 17, 1904, p. 5)

 

Gunston Hall

Julia Dulion Lopez (1857-1918) died at Biloxi, Mississippi on June 30, 1918. Before her demise, she had appointed Erena Lopez Brady, as executrix, of her estate without bonding.  Her bequests to Teresa Lopez Folkes was the Rodenberg Survey lot.  In February 1906, Julia Dulion Lopez  had acquired for $3250 from the Heirs of John Henry Rodenberg, a large lot, 142 feet in width and 600 feet deep, measured from the southeast corner of in Lot 1-Block 1 of the Maunsel White Survey.  It was  situated on Biloxi’s West Beach.  The Heirs of John Henry Rodenberg were: Cord Henry Rodenberg; Harriet Amanda Rodenberg; Maria Theresa Rodenberg; Eva Langhorne Rodenberg;  Mary Francis Murdock; and Eva Anne Shaffer. The Lopez lot was subject to a 25-foot right of way to the Gulfport was left open on the west side of the lot and a  & Mississippi Coast Traction Company situated south of the shell road.  In addition,  a 45-foot road was to be left open on the west side of the tract and a 50-foot wide street to be left open on the north end of the lot.(Harrison Co., Mississippi Chancery Court Land Deed Bk.71 or 73, p. 373 and Harrison Co. , Mississippi Chancery Court Cause No. 1663,  “The Estate of Julia Dulion Lopez”-1918 )

 

As early as September 1919, the Folkes were planning a home for the Rodenberg Lot.  At this time, H.H. Roof, local architect, was making architectural drawings for their structure on the corner of West Beach and Rodenberg Avenue.(The Daily Herald, September 19, 1919, p. 2 and  

 

West Beach lot

In January 1905, Octavie Tricou Weysham (1835-1910) conveyed to Teresa Lopez Folkes a large tract of land on West Beach.  The consideration was $4000 and the Weysham parcel had a front of 100 feet on the Gulf and ran north to Pass Christian Road.  Catherine Perry was to the west and Dr. Folkes’ Sanatorium was to the east.  Shortly thereafter in June 1905, Erena Lopez acquired the Perry large tract which was east of the Biloxi Cemetery for $17,000.  It a front on the Gulf of Mexico of three hundred sixty-eight feet and ran north almost 1200 feet to Cemetery Road, now Irish Hill Drive.(Harrison Co., Mississippi Land Deed Bk. 64, p. 388 and Bk. 69, p. 89)    

 

The Weysham property was sold to Mrs. Folkes by Richard B. Harrison (1831-1905), local agent, and the father of Charles T. Harrison (1863-1948), who would develop a 20th Century real estate empire in Biloxi.  The Weysham place had been on the market for several years and had two houses situated on it.(The Biloxi Daily Herald, October 21, 1902, p. 3 and December 10, 1904, p. 4)

 

Mrs. Octavie T. Weysham was born at New Orleans.  In July 1877, she had married Alphonse Charles Weysham (1831-1900), the widower of her sister, Emma Tricou Weysham (1831-1876).  Emma had given birth to Blanche Weysham Harris (1862-1900+), who was reared by Octavie and Alphonse C. Weysham.  He made his livelihood as cashier for a large commercial house in the Crescent City.(1880 Orleans Parish Federal Census R461, p. 371C, ED 43)       

 

Gulf Coast Sanitarium and Health Resort

Dr. James E. Wallace (1876-1942) joined Dr. Folkes in the summer of 1911.  He had been at the Biloxi Sanatorium several years past, but returned to Touro Infirmary at NOLA before relocating to Biloxi to partner with Dr. Folker.  Dr. Wallace planned to  live at the Sanatorium and have his office over Grant’s Drugstore on West Howard Avenue.(The Daily Herald, July 21, 1911, p. 8)

 

Founded by Dr. H.M. Folkes.  Consisted of operating room and clinic.  In 1912, installed a modern X-Ray machine in clinic. .(The Daily Herald, January 8, 1913, p. 1)

 

In January 1913, Dr. Folkes hosted the Harrison County Medical Association at his sanitarium.  Coast  physicians attending were: Dr. R.L. White, Dr. G.F. Carroll, and Dr. H.M. Folkes of Biloxi; Dr. A.L. Morris, Dr. A.C. Caraway, Dr. C.A. Sheely, Dr. D.J. Williams, Dr. E.C. Parker, and Dr. H.H. West of Gulfport; Dr. W.A. Dearman and Dr. D.G. Mohler of Long Beach; Dr. B.Z. Welch of Woolmarket; Dr. G.A. McHenry of McHenry; and Dr. J.P. Berry of Jackson.(The Daily Herald, January 8, 1913, p. 1)

 

1st National Bank of Biloxi

Dr. H.M. Folkes resigned as president of the 1st National Bank of Biloxi in December 1916.  He had sold all of his interest in the bank.  Edward C. Tonsmeire was elected president by the bank’s board and would also continue as cashier.(The Daily Herald, December 14, 1916, p. 1)

 

Hotel Biloxi

 to H.M. Folkes for $15,000 in September 1919.  Dr. Folkes then almost immediately he sold to J.S. Love, State Bank Examiner for the State of Mississippi for $250 and assumption of trust deed.(Harrison Co., Mississippi Land Deed Bk. 124, p. 414 and Bk. 415)

 

Hotel Biloxi sale

H.M. Folkes, president and Teresa L. Folkes, secretary respectively conveyed the Hotel Biloxi to W.B. Patterson of Mobile, Alabama in February 1923.  The sale included all furniture, fixtures, appliances, buildings, capital stock of the Hotel Biloxi, and the artesian well rights deeded to Dr. Folkes.(Harrison Co., Mississippi Land Deed Bk. 137, p. 256)

 

New ownership

In April 1925, W.B. Patterson agreed to a lease purchase on the Hotel Biloxi with J.P. Edwards of Ocean Springs and Lee M. Russell (1876-1930+) of Gulfport and later Biloxi.  The grantees agreed to pay Mr. Patterson $79,300 for the hotel and assume a $20,700 mortgage with the International Life Insurance Company.  In addition they would be responsible for taxes and fire and tornado insurance on the property in the amount of $100,000.(Harrison Co., Mississippi Land Deed Bk. 162, p. 375)

 

Harry W. Fitzpatrick and Phillip W. Levine

In September 1925, Monsieur’s Edwards and Russell assigned their hotel lease and obligations to Harry W. Fitzpatrick (1876-1926) of New Orleans and Phillip W. Levine (1890-1940) of Biloxi.(Harrison Co., Mississippi Land Deed Bk. 162, p. 379)

 

Harry W. Fitzpatrick was born at NOLA of an Irish immigrant father and Alabama mother.  He improved his lot in life from driving a truck for a packing house to a dynamic force in real estate from New Orleans to Mobile.  Mr. Fitzpatrick opened an office in Biloxi in the winter of 1924.  He maintained his main real estate office on Royal Street in NOLA.  Another talent of Mr. Fitzpatrick was the public auctioning of land and homes.(The Daily Herald, December 5, 1924, p. 6)

 

Catherine Newman ‘Kate’ Shelly (1859-1930), Mrs. Fitzgerald’s mother, resided at Ocean Springs at No. 30 West Porter with Mary Newman Murphy (1870-1942), her sister.  Mrs. Murphy was the spouse of James J. Murphy (1867-1944).(The Jackson County Times, June 22, 1929, p. 3)

 

Phillip W. Levine (1889-1940) came to the United States from East Prussia, now a part of Russia, arriving at NYC in June 1900 from Hamburg, Germany.  He married Jeanette Alexander (1892-1940+) at NOLA in August 1912.  They came to Biloxi before 1917 and reared their five children here.  Before his involvement in the Hotel Biloxi, Mr. Levine owned retail shoe stores at Biloxi and Gulfport..(The Daily Herald, February 16, 1940, p. 1)

 

In July 1926, Fitzpatrick and Levine dealt their assignment of the Hotel Biloxi to Harold R. Bechtel and George M. Bechtel of Davenport, Iowa.  The consideration was $126,500 and all of the obligations that were attached to the original agreement between Patterson and the Edwards-Russell grant of April 1925.(Harrison Co., Mississippi Land Deed Bk. 162, p. 375)

 

Bechtel and Bechtel and New Biloxi Hotel

George Martin Bechtel (1868-1952) and Harold Reimers Bechtel (1894-1987) were domiciled at Davenport, Scott County, Iowa.  They were father and son and respectively president and vice-president of the George M. Bechtel Company whose salient business was brokering bonds from their Davenport, Iowa office.  In September 1926, the Chancery Court of Harrison County, Mississippi was confirmed to W.B. Patterson by adverse possession.  In December 1927, the Bechtels paid W.B. Patterson $18,350 and together the three gentlemen sold the resort to the Hotel Biloxi Company Inc.(Harrison Co., Mississippi Land Deed Bk. 173, p. 84)

 

George D. Stannus

Under the Bechtel leadership, new capital was invested in the old Folkes resort property and The New Biloxi Hotel, a fireproof Southern Colonial style edifice, was built in 1927.  The Federal Engineering Company of Davenport, Iowa was given charge of the building project and George D. Stannus (1880-1930+), manager of the old Hotel Biloxi who had taken this position in 1923, continued as local hotel manager.  Mr. Stannus was a native of Uniontown, Kentucky.  He had married Bernice Dickie (1881-1930+) of Citronelle, Alabama in 1908 and they had one son, George R. Stannus (1909-1998), who would later become his father’s assistant in managing the New Hotel Biloxi.(The Daily Herald, April 12, 1927, p. 2 and The Daily Herald Golden Jubilee Issue, 1934, p. 16)

 

Construction-May 1927

In early May 1927, before construction of the $600,000 New Biloxi Hotel commenced, the Collins Brothers Contracting Company of Biloxi demolished the wood frame building and pavilion in front of the structure.  The east wing of the Hotel Biloxi was moved to the rear and served as living quarters for the Stannus family and other hotel personnel until the New Biloxi Hotel was completed about December 1st.  This wooden building would later serve as the servants quarters for the new hotel. (The Daily Herald, May 2, 1927, p. 2, May 5, 1927, p. 2, and December 1, 1927, p. 1)  

 

Collins Brothers and other contractors

On May 11, 1927, the Collins Brothers were awarded the $285,000 contract for building the four-story, 118-room, New Biloxi Hotel.  It was designed by Ira H. Coyne (1892-1976) of the Federal Engineering Company of Davenport, Iowa.  William J. Collins (1886-1962) and George J. Collins (1891-1968) had built their first Biloxi building in 1912.  Since that time, they had erected commercial structures for: Catholic Church at Gulfport; Back Bay School [Gorenflo]; Edwards-Butler Motor Company; Daily Herald Building; Caldwell Building; Yerger Building; C.W. Wachenfeld Apartments; August Wachenfeld Apartments; Bay View Hotel; and remodeled the Peoples’ Bank.  The Collins Brothers had learned the building trades from John Collins (1854-1929), their father.  Joseph O. Collins (b. 1922), son of William J. Collins, continued in the contracting business at Biloxi until the present day.(The Daily Herald, May 11, 1927, p. 1)

 

The Biloxi Plumbing and Heating Company headed by Henry L. Schwan (1889-1956) and Grover W. Graham (1893-1964) received the $46,300 contract for plumbing and heating the building while the electrical work to cost about $10,000 was given to the J.M. Johnson & Company of Dallas, Texas.(The Daily Herald, May 11, 1927, p. 1)

By December 1927, the New Biloxi Hotel was in the finishing phase of its construction.  The furniture, fixtures, carpets and ancillary equipment had arrived.

 

COMMENTS ON THE BILOXI HOTEL

BY

Julius M. ‘Jay’ Lopez II (1908-1990)

This is interesting the story on the Biloxi Hotel.  The ‘old’ Biloxi Hotel, you wouldn’t know about, but this is a picture of it here.  This was built in either 1903 or 1904 somewhere in there.  It was after Laz Lopez’s death [September 25, 1903].  It was built as a sanatorium.

 

Interviewer-Was that the same Biloxi Hotel whose skeleton is still standing?  No it’s the same site.  This was built a year or so after [Laz] Lopez’s death.  It was built by Hyman Folkes (18-19).  Hyman Folkes was Lopez’s son-in-law.  He married Teresa Lopez (18-19).  He was an M.D.  He built this as the Biloxi Sanatorium as a memorial to Laz Lopez.  The for some reason in about 1908 or 1909, it became a

 

Depression and bankruptcy

In May 1936, The Hotel Biloxi was insolvent and filed proceedings to reorganize the company under Section 77-B of the Bankruptcy Act.  This device had been enacted into law in 1934, as an amendment to Roosevelt’s Bankruptcy Act of 1933 and allowed the Biloxi Hotel to be discharged from its debts and liabilities particularly the First Trust & Savings Bank of Davenport, Iowa.(Harrison Co., Mississippi Land Deed Bk. 209, p. 164)

 

1949 Hotel Biloxi sale and reincorporation

In September 1949, Harold R. Bechtel (1894-1987), president, and Frank Johnson, secretary, domiciled at Scott County, Iowa sold the Hotel Biloxi Company, Inc. to Jane Long of Chicago.  The sales price was $290,000.(Harrison Co., Mississippi Land Deed Bk. 314, p. 268)

 

The Hotel Biloxi was reincorporated in July 1949 by Thomas F. Seay (1903-1994), vice-president, and Jane Long, secretary, of Chicago, Illinois.  When its charter was amended in 1951, Seba F. Mahony (1882-1966), had replaced Jane Long as secretary of the organization.  These individuals were all domiciled at Chicago and were experienced in banking and real estate brokering and sales in the Windy City.(Harrison Co., Mississippi Chattel Deed Bk. 116, p. 495 and Bk. 132, p. 495)

 

1953 Reorganization

In 1953, the Hotel Biloxi became insolvent and the company was dissolved and its charter surrendered.  Officers at this time were Thomas F. Seay, president; Thomas Burns, executive vice president; and Seba F. Mahony, secretary-treasurer.  Alfonse G. Mahony (1879-1953+), the brother of Seba F. Mahony and a single man of Chicago, became owner and assumed all debt and liens.(Harrison Co., Mississippi Land Deed Bk. 368, p. 210)

 

In May 1953, Alfonse G. Mahony conveyed the Hotel Biloxi to G.E. Weaver, trustee and assistant secretary of Banker’s Life and Casualty.  Banker’s Life and Casualty sold the hotel to MacArthur Hotels, Inc. in September 1956.(Harrison Co., Mississippi Land Deed Bk. 415, p. 363)

 

The Biloxi MacArthur Hotel

In the spring of 1958, the Biloxi Hotel now owned by the MacArthur Hotels group headed by Charles H. Little and W.J. Canfield, performed a $50,000 refurbishment of the old Southern Colonial, style hostel.  The lobby, corridors and one hundred-eighteen rooms were redecorated and finished in a relaxing combination of light blue and gray colors.  The rear of the hotel had a garden with fountain, tennis and badminton courts, playground for children, and two large BBQ pits.  The front lawn was graced with a swimming pool and across US Highway 90, a 750-foot pier gave guest access to fishing and swimming.(Down South, Vol. 8, No. 3, p. 8)

 

CHATEAU LE GRAND [1130 West Beach.  Image March 2011 by Ray L. Bellande]

 

Chateau Le Grand

Biloxi Hotel converted to condominiums and opened December 1981.  

 

Southeast Corner of West Howard and Reynoir Street

Laz Lopez, Sr. had acquired two very valuable, contiguous lots on the southeast corner of West Howard Avenue and Reynoir Street in August 1895 from the Estate of Constantino Olivari (1841-1894), an Italian immigrant entrepreneur.  The tract had 120-feet on West Howard Avenue and ran south with 150-feet fronting on Reynoir.  Upon his demise and subsequent probate in 1903, Teresa Lopez Folkes was legated a one-half interest in this property.  Theodore P. Dulion (1861-1907), the uncle of Mrs. Folkes, owned the other undivided, one-half interest.  After the death of Mr. Dulion in 1907, his one-half interest was left to his children: Una C. Dulion; Paul Dulion; Barton Dulion; Roy Dulion; Fay Dulion Hermann; and Julia Abbey Dulion.  They sold their interest to Tersea Lopez Folkes in February 1924 for $20,000.  Grant’s Drug Store was situated on this property.(Harrison Co., Mississippi Land Deed Bk. 33, p. 113 and Bk. 140, p. 567 and Bk. 140, p. 588)

This property left to daughters:

 

Travels

In August 1898, Theresa Lopez left by train with the Dunbar family for New York City an dother eastern waterin places.  They expected to be gone for a month.(The Biloxi Herald, August 16, 1898, p. 8)

In September 1926, Theresa L. Folkes and Erena L. Brady, her sister, with Josephne Folkes and Anna Folkes departed San Francisco by ship for Honolulu, Hawaii.  They planned to return to Biloxi by mid-October.(The Daily Herald, September 13, 1926)

 

Estate

 

CHILDREN

 

Josephine L. Folkes

Josephine Lopez Folkes (1901-1959) was born at Biloxi, Mississippi on March 13, 1901.  She attended Ursuline College at NOLA and St. Mary of the Pines, Chatawa, Mississippi.  Josephine married Dr. Albert Brown Russ (1888-1953) on February 18, 1928.  In 1930, Josephine and Albert B. Russ were domiciled on West Beach at Biloxi with Mrs. Folkes, her recently widowed mother.  The Folkes home was called and situated between Marie Rodenburg and Dr. Benton Z. Welch.  Dr. Russ and Josephine divorced before 1942 and he married Delphine Holloway (1898-1995).(Harrison Co., Mississippi MRB 40, p. 232 and Bk. 58, p. 469 and 1930 Harrison Co., Mississippi R 1146, p. 3A, ED 7)

 

Albert Brown Russ (1888-1953) was born at Pearlington, Mississippi on November 25, 1888, to Asa Russ (and Harriet Boardman (1856-1932).  He attended Millsaps College and was a graduate of the University of Kentucky.  In 1919, Dr. Russ came to Biloxi to practice dentistry.

 

Delphine Holloway (1898-1995) at Biloxi.  She was the daughter of Andrew J. Holloway (1876-1934) and Josephine Newman.  Mr. Holloway was born at New Orleans.  He made his livelihood with the L&N Railroad at Gautier, Mississippi where he was superintendent of the creosote plant.  The newly weds honeymooned at Atlanta.  They resided in the Folkes home on West Beach in Biloxi.(The Daily Herald, February 25, 1928, p. 2)

 

Delphine H. Russ was a schoolteacher and served as principal of Howard II Elementary School in the early 1950s.  Dr. Russ died on February 14, 1953.  His remains were interred in the Southern Memorial Park Cemetery at Biloxi.

 

Thomas Burns

On August 12, 1952, Josephine Lopez Folkes married Thomas Burns (1892-1974), the son of John C. Burns (1863-1910) and Delia Welsch.  He was a native of New Orleans and his paternal and maternal grandparents were Irish immigrants.  Thomas Burns served in the US Navy during WWI on a submarine chaser in the Gulf of Mexico.  He was discharged as a Ensign.  By 1920, Burns was the secretary of a hotel company in New Orleans, possibly the old Grunewald Hotel, which became the Roosevelt Hotel.(T625_619, p. 19A, ED 56 and The Times Picayune, December 28, 1954, p. 3)

 

Before arriving at Biloxi in 1927 as resident first manager of the new Edgewater Gulf Hotel, Mr. Burns had been at the Edgewater Beach Hotel in Chicago.  He returned to New Orleans in August 1934 as manager of the Jung Hotel at 1500 Canal Street when it was owned by Peter Jung Jr. (1882-1941) and Arthur L. Jung (1883-1964).  Before his betrothal to Josephine Folkes, Thomas Burns had married and divorced Stella Kenney (1904-1980) of NOLA, the daughter of Stella Monteleone Kenney (1882-1939).  James D. Kenney her father was secretary-treasurer of the Monteleone Hotel in NOLA.(The Daily Herald, June 26, 1934, p. 2 and December 26, 1939, p. 2)

 

During WWII, Thomas Burns went back into the US Navy and served aboard the USS Cabot, an aircraft carrier,in the South Pacific Theatre.  Later during the conflict, as a Lt. Commander of a freighter, his vessel was torpedoed and sank.  He was awarded the Silver Star, Presidential Citation and several combat stars for his military exploits against the Empire of Japan.  Thomas Burns ended his long career in hotel management at the Drake Hotel in Chicago in the early 1950s.  He and Francis P. Burns (1886-19), his brother and former City Attorney of New Orleans, had become accomplished boat builders while growing up in the Crescent City.  This skill and his love for sailing vessels led him to accept a management position at a large marina on Ortega Creek in the St. John’s River area near Jacksonville, Florida in April 1951.  Mr. Burns returned to New Orleans in 1954 to become resident manager of the new Motel De Ville, a $2 million motel erected at 3800 Tulane Avenue.(The Times Picayune December 28, 1954, p. 3)

 

Thomas Burns expired in his native Crescent City in late November 1974.  His corporal remains were interred in St. Patrick’s Cemetery No. 2.  During his long career in hotel and motel management, Mr. Burns had been identified with the following hostelries: Hotel Bienville, Grunevald Hotel, and Motel De Ville at NOLA; Edgewater Beach, Hotel Blackstone, and Drake Hotel in Chicago; Edgewater Gulf and Biloxi Hotel at Biloxi, Mississippi. (The Times Picayune December 28, 1954, p. 3)

 

Thomas Burns and Josephine Folkes Burns had no children.  She expired at the Touro Infirmary in NOLA on November 22, 1959 where she had been hospitalized on November 13, 1959 after having a stroke.   managed the Versailles Motel.  When Mrs. Burns was in Biloxi, she was domiciled at 1306 West Beach Boulevard.(Harrison Co., Mississippi MRB 90, p. 413 and The Daily Herald, November 23, 1959, p. 2)

 

Estate

Josephine Folkes Burns legated her valuable commercial property on the southeast corner of West Howard Avenue and Reynoir Street to her husband, Anna Folkes Kelly, her sister, and the following nieces and nephews: Josephine Kelly Kennedy; Thomas S. Kelly; Robert Kelly; and Hyman David Kelly.(Harrison Co., Mississippi Land Deed Bk. 475, p. 307)

 

Anna O. Folkes

Anna Odenal Folkes (1907-1968) was born at Biloxi, Mississippi on December 13, 1907.  In 1916-1917, she attended school with Josephine and Beulah Dukate at St. Mary of the Pines, Chatawa, Mississippi. In 1921, Anna and Dorothy H. Folkes (1912-1925), her younger sister, were students at Nazareth College in Louisville, Kentucky.  Nazareth College had been founded in October 1920 by the Sisters of Charity of Nazareth and was the first Catholic college in the Commonwealth of Kentucky exclusively for women.(The Daily Herald, January 2, 1917, p.3 and September 7, 1921, p. 4)

 

In January 1928, Anna O. Folkes married Eugene Robert Kelly (1902-1990), a native of Chicago, at Biloxi, Mississippi.  They resided in Waukegan, Illinois until 1963 when they returned to Biloxi and resided at 1306 West Beach Boulevard.  Anna and  Robert Kelly were the parents of four children: Robert Folkes Kelly (1928); Josephine Kelly (1930-2008) m. William P. Kennedy III (1926-1975) and Albert Sidney Johnston III (b. 1929); Hyman David Kelly; and Thomas Stephen Kelly.(Harrison Co., Mississippi MRB 40, p. 171 and The Daily Herald, August 6, 1968, p. 2)

 

Dorothy H. Folkes

Dorothy Hilzeim Folkes (1912-1925) was born at Biloxi, Mississippi on January 10, 1912.  In 1921, she and Anna O. Folkes, her sister, attended the Nazareth Academy at Louisville, Kentucky.  Dorothy H. Folkes passed untimely on September 14, 1925 in Louisville, Kentucky from diptheria.  Her corporal remains were interred in the H.M. Folkes burial plot in the Biloxi City Cemetery.(The Daily Herald, September 7, 1921, p. 4, September 14, 1925, p. 3 and September 15, 1925, p. 3).

 

REFERENCES:

The Biloxi Daily Herald, Business and Professional Men, (The Biloxi Daily Herald: Biloxi, Mississippi-1902).

The Daily Herald 50th Golden Jubilee Number Biographical and Historical 1884-1934, (The Daily Herald: Gulfport-Biloxi, Mississippi-1934).

Jerome Lepre, Catholic Church Records Diocese of Biloxi, Mississippi, Volume I, (Catholic Dioceses of Biloxi: Biloxi, Mississippi-1991).

Magazines

Down South, “The Biloxi Hotel”, Volume 1, No. 1, January-February 1951.

Down South, “The Biloxi Hotel”, Volume 2, No. 3, May-June 1952.

Down South, “The Biloxi MacArthur Hotel on the historic site where Biloxi was born”, Volume 8, No. 3, May-June 1958.

Chancery Court

Harrison County, Mississippi Chancery Court Cause No. 683, “Eulalie Clark v. V.J. Olivari”-1895.

Harrison County, Mississippi Chancery Court Cause No. 1663, “The Estate of Julia Dulion Lopez”-1918

Harrison County, Mississippi Chancery Court Cause No. 7586, “Teresa L. Folkes v. Roy Dulion, et al”-February 1924.

Harrison County, Mississippi Chancery Court Cause No. 9293, “W.B. Patterson v. Hotel Biloxil”-September 1926.

Harrison County, Mississippi Chancery Court Cause No. 30497, “Estate of Teresa Lopez  Folkes”-March 1952.

Harrison County, Mississippi Chancery Court Cause No. 19362, “Margaret Hamlin dba ‘This Week in New Orleans’ v. Senior Citizens Hotel”-Apri1 1961.

Harrison County, Mississippi Chancery Court Cause No. 33058, “? v. Hotel Biloxi”-May 1953.

Harrison County, Mississippi Chancery Court Cause No. 41868, “Estate of Josephine Folkes Burns”-February 1961.

Journals

The Biloxi Herald,“Quarantine Station at Cat Island”, July 25, 1896.

The Biloxi Herald,“City News”, May 22, 1897.

The Biloxi Herald,“City News”, October 30, 1897.

The Biloxi Daily Herald, April 24, 1897, p. 8.

The Biloxi Daily Herald, "Latest City News"August 16, 1898, p. 8.

The Biloxi Daily Herald,“Dr. H.M. Folkes [advertisement],  February 10, 1899.

The Biloxi Daily Herald,“Brilliant Affair [Folkes-Lopez]”, June 5, 1900.

The Biloxi Daily Herald,“City News”, June 5, 1900.

The Biloxi Daily Herald,“A New Building”, May 5 , 1901.

The Biloxi Daily Herald,“City News”, July 19, 1901.

The Biloxi Daily Herald,“City News”, July 25, 1901.

The Biloxi Daily Herald,“City News” July 28, 1901.

The Biloxi Daily Herald,“City News”, January 16, 1902.

The Biloxi Daily Herald,“Council Meeting”, April 23, 1902.

The Biloxi Daily Herald,“Charter of Incorporation of the Biloxi Sanatorium”, June 22, 1902.

The Biloxi Daily Herald,“City News”, August 2, 1902.

The Biloxi Daily Herald,“Biloxi Real Estate and Loan Agency”, October 21, 1902.

The Biloxi Daily Herald,“City News”, February 20, 1903.

The Biloxi Daily Herald,“A Northern Lady”, February 24, 1903.

The Biloxi Daily Herald,“Biloxi Marine Hospital”, April 9, 1903.

The Biloxi Daily Herald,“Three decked pavilion”, September 18, 1903.

The Biloxi Daily Herald,“Among Herald advertisers”, October 2, 1903.

The Biloxi Daily Herald,“City News”, December 29, 1903.

The Biloxi Daily Herald,“Necrological-Capt. A.A. Folkes”, January 2, 1904.

The Biloxi Daily Herald,“Heavy fire losses”, April 5, 1904.

The Biloxi Daily Herald,“After the fire”, April 6, 1904.

The Biloxi Daily Herald,“Sanatorium”, April 12, 1904, 1904.

The Biloxi Daily Herald, “”, November 17, 1904.

The Biloxi Daily Herald,“Personal”, November 21, 1904.

The Biloxi Daily Herald,“City News”, December 10, 1904.

The Biloxi Daily Herald,“Personal”, April 28, 1906.

The Daily Herald,“New Hotel for Biloxi”, April 7, 1908.

The Daily Herald, “To open resort Hotel”, May 28, 1909.

The Daily Herald, “To convert Hotel into Sanitarium”, September 7, 1909.

The Daily Herald,“Biloxi News of Personal Interest”, January 14, 1910.

The Daily Herald, Dr. Folkes tells why $100,000 hospital is need at the Old Soldiers' Home", July 30, 1921, p. 1.

The Daily Herald, Tartt completes arrangments to carry [CSA] Vets to Chattanooga free", October 22, 1921, p. 1.

The Biloxi News, “Biloxi plunged into grief by sudden death of Saturday of Dr. H.M. Folkes”, May 2, 1926.

The Clarion Ledger, “Advertisement [A.A. Folkes]”, May 2, 1889.

The Daily Herald,“Dr. Wallace and Dr. Folkes are partners”, July 21, 1911.

The Daily Herald,“Mr. Tonsmeire is elected president [1st National Bank of Biloxi]”,

The Daily Herald,“Biloxi Local News”, January 2, 1917.

The Daily Herald,“Will be known as Hotel Biloxi”, February 20, 1919.

The Daily Herald,“Hotel Biloxi changes hands”, September 19, 1919.

The Daily Herald,“Dr. H.M. Folkes is host of Harrison County doctors”, January 8, 1913.

The Daily Herald, "Plans for new home", September 19, 1919,

The Daily Herald,“Attending College”, September 7, 1921.

The Daily Herald,“Biloxi News Paragraphs”, October 31, 1922.

The Daily Herald,“Miss Dorothy Folkes dies, September 14, 1925.

The Daily Herald, “Biloxi News Items [death of Dorothy H. Folkes]”, September 15, 1925.

The Daily Herald, “Open branch office in Biloxi”, December 5, 1924.

The Daily Herald, “Biloxians to sail for Honolulu”, September 13, 1926.

The Daily Herald,“Bids soon for new hotel”, April 12, 1927.

The Daily Herald,“Razing old Biloxi Hotel”, May 2, 1927.

The Daily Herald,“Biloxi Hotel being moved”, May 5, 1927.

The Daily Herald,“Another handsome new hotel for Biloxi”, May 7, 1927.

The Daily Herald,“Contract is let for new $650,000 Biloxi Hotel”, May 11, 1927.

The Daily Herald,“To complete Hotel Biloxi about Dec. 1”, October 11, 1927.

The Daily Herald,“New Biloxi Hotel to open for business December 15”, December 1, 1927.

The Daily Herald, “Dr. and Mrs. Russ Return”, February 25, 1928, p. 2.

The Daily Herald,“Biloxi Hospital history dates back over 20 years”, July 2, 1928.

The Daily Herald, "Doctors Russ Lose Mother", September 12, 1932, p. 2.

The Daily Herald,“W.M. [sic]Grant dies in New Orleans”, October 3, 1932.

The Daily Herald,“Burns new Jung manager”, June 26, 1934.

The Daily Herald,“Captain Pete Eskald once owned Ship Island gun but couldn’t move it”, July 8, 1937.

The Daily Herald,“Yerger Building purchased by Mr. and Mrs. Ed Barq”, April 21, 1938.

The Daily Herald,“Mrs. Kenney dies”, December 26, 1939.

The Daily Herald,“Levine succumbs to short illness”, February 16, 1940.

The Daily Herald,“Hotel Biloxi [advertisement]”, April 3, 1948.

The Daily Herald,“Mrs. H.M. Folkes dies after long illness”, July 27, 1951.

The Daily Herald, "Russ Funeral At 3:30 Today", February 16, 1953, p. 1.

The Daily Herald,“Mrs. Thomas Burns’ funeral is Tuesday”, November 23, 1959.

The Daily Herald,“Burns’ rites”, November 24, 1959.

The Daily Herald,“Anna Folkes Kelly”, August 6, 1968.

The Jackson County Times, “Local and Personal”,June 22, 1929.

The Jackson County Times, “Grant’s”, June 22, 1929.

The Sun Herald,“Eugene Robert Kelly”, October 16, 1990.

The Sun Herald,“Biloxi Sanatorium put coast on the map”, June 9?, 1995.

The Times Picayune,“The Jung Hotel”, August 26, 1934.

The Times Picayune,“Burns former manager of Jung, to switch from hotels to yachts”, April 17, 1951.

The Times Picayune,“Motel De Ville manager named”, December 28, 1954.

The Times Picayune,“Biloxi woman [Josephine Folkes Burns] passes Sunday”, November 23, 1959.

The Times Picayune,“Thomas Burns service today”, November 26, 1974.

The Times Picayune,“”,

_________________________________________________________________________________________________

LAZARO T. LOPEZ           

Lazaro T. Lopez [first on left] and business associates

[Courtesy of Jon Kroninger-April 2013]

 

Lazaro Theodore Lopez (1877-1918) was born at Biloxi, Mississippi on November 25, 1877.  On December 14, 1898, he married Eurilda ‘Lily’ Seal (1879-1966), the daughter of Florian Seal (1853-1927) and Rebecca Victoria Walker Seal (1853-1936).  Their wedding was held at the Church of the Annunciation at New Orleans.  The Lopez wedding party consisted of Laz Lopez, Miss Teresa Lopez, Arnaud Lopez, Dr. H.M. Folkes.  Miss Seal was represented by her parents and Roderick Seal (1881-1936+), her brother.(The Biloxi Daily Herald, December 14, 1898, p. 8 and December 15, 1898, p. 7)          

 

Florian Seal

Florian Seal (1852-1927) was born on east Pass Christian Street [Howard Avenue] at Biloxi on February 17, 1853.  His parents were Roderick Seal and Charlotte Orr Seal.  In 1877, Mr. Seal married Rebecca V. Walker (1853-1936) of Bay St. Louis, Mississippi.   They were the parents of two children:  Eurilda J. Seal (1879-1966) m. Lazaro Lopez Jr. (1877-1918) and Roderick Dudley Seal (1881-1942) m. Marie Ramon.(The Biloxi Daily Herald, Business and Professional Men, 1902, p. 56)

 

Florian Seal, popular Sheriff of Harrison County, rode his bicycle with considerable skill and grace so as to quickly fulfill his business engagements in Biloxi.(The Biloxi Herald, January 20, 1894, p. 8)

 

At Biloxi, when Mr. Seal was not in public office, as he was Sheriff of Harrison County five times, Tax Assessor of Harrison County four times, and Deputy Clerk of the Chancery and Circuit Courts of Jackson County, Mississippi in 1872-1873, functioned in local commerce operating as the Cash Variety Store.  Apparently, Florian Seal had lost his store building in the Great Biloxi Fire of November 1900, because in January 1901, he had workmen erecting a new commercial structure on Howard Avenue next to the Biloxi Daily Herald Building.  The Seal store building was twenty-six feet on the front and about seventy-five feet deep.(The Biloxi Daily Herald, January 5, 1901, p. 8 and January 8, 1901, p. 8)

 

Expired December 11, 1927

In September 1898, Roderick Seal and spouse sold the Montross Hotel to John H. Miller and John Carraway for $12,000.(Harrison County, Ms. Land deed Bk. 39, p. 79)

 

Mrs. Rebecca Walker Seal passed on at New Orleans at the residence of her daughter, Eurilda Lopez.  Her corporal remains were interred in the St. Roch Cemetery in the Crescent City.(The Daily Herald, September 12, 1936, p. 5)

 

Florian Seal, a Biloxi native, had an illustrious political public service career in Harrison County, Mississippi.  During his life, he held thirteen public offices.  Among them were: county officer, Sheriff-five terms; and tax assessor-eight terms.  Florian Seal’s education was at Springhill College, Mobile, Alabama and at Washington and Lee in Lexington, Virginia.  Rebecca Walker Seal was born at Bay St. Louis, Mississippi.(The Daily Herald, December 12, 1927, p. 1 and September 12, 1936)

 

In his youth Lazaro accidentally shot a youngster named Henzelena.  The Henzelena boy died ten days later from blood poisoning and lock jaw from his gunshot wound.(The Biloxi Herald, November 6, 1897, p. 8)

 

In 1906, Laz Lopez, Arnaud Lopez, John J. Kennedy, Jess Diaz, Rudolph Abbley, M. Hunter and  B. Voivedich were arrested for playing baseball in Biloxi on Sunday.  They were fined $2.50 each in the Circuit Court of Harrison County, Mississippi in September 1906.(Harrison Co., Mississippi Circuit Court Miniute Bk. 8, p. 63)

 

CIRCUIT COURT MINUTE BOOK 8, p. 63.

 

FAMILY

Lazaro T. Lopez and Lily Seal were the parents of: Wilda Lopez (1899-1977) m. Dr. James E. Wallace (1876-1942) m. Lynden Bowring (1889-1980); Clara Seal Lopez (1902-1936) m. Leslie R. Tarr (1897-1972) m. Paul O. Froede (1896-1968); Lazaro J. Lopez (1907-1968) m. Marjorie Donovan (1910-2010); Beverly [Lily Bea.]  Lopez  (1904-1991) m. Howard Born and Oscar E. Berggren; Florian Seal Lopez (1911-1957) m. Maxine Stivers; and John B. Lopez (1915-1970) m. Juanita Abbey Eckles (1913-1995).

 

Banker

2nd vice-president and on board of directors of the Bank of Biloxi in 1909 with W.K.M Dukate and William Gorenflo, president and 1st vice-president respectively.(The Daily Herald, September 29, 1909, p. 3)

 

Business affiliations

Lazaro T. Lopez explaining child labor in the Dunbar , Lopez and Dukate factory in 1913.[from Edward F. Brown report to the National Child Labor Committe titles Child Labor in the Gulf Coast, p. 11. see http://www.loc.gov/exhibits/treasures/trm032.html

 

 

Lopez and Greiner

 

 

Kennedy-Lopez Company

           

 

 

Merchandising

L. Lopez & Company

 

 

Banks

Director of the Bank of Biloxi and the Biloxi Savings Bank & Trust Company,         

 

Columbia Ice and Power Company

Operated at Columbia, Mississippi supplying electric power and ice.  In January 1910, the company was owned byGeorge W. Grayson, president; Lee Elder, secretary and general manager.  Board of directors: W.K.M. Dukate; Lazaro Lopez; William Gorenflo; Lee Elder; and George W. Grayson.(The Daily Herald, January 18, 1910)

 

New Orleans

In the fall of 1918, the Lopez family took quarters in the Washington Apartments on Washington Avenue at New Orleans.  In addition to his business operations in the Crescent City, Laz Lopez was planning a vegetable and seafood cannery at Franklin, St. Mary Parish, Louisiana which had to be built by late November 1918.  Unfortunately he was stricken with flu and expired from pneumonia at NOLA on 23 October 1918.  The entire Lopez family had contracted the virus, but only their father died.  Mr. Lopez's corporal remains were sent to Biloxi for committal in the Biloxi Cemetery.(The NO Item. February 3, 1918, p. 9 and The Daily Herald, October 22, 1918, p. 4 and The Times-Picayune, October 25, 1918, p. 2)

 

Estate

 

The heirs of Laz Lopez were: Eurilda J. Seal Lopez; Wilda Lopez Wallace; Clara Lopez Tarr; Beverly Lopez Born; and minor children: John Lopez; Florian Lopez; and Laz Lopez.  Each received a 1/7 interest in his estate.

 

Land Holdings

 

Harrison County, Mississippi

Lot No. 6 Summerville Addition; Lot 12 Summerville Addition; Lot No. 3 in Block 176 City of Gulfport; 40-foot lot on West Biloxi Beach described as east by Rosell and west by Russ.

 

Jackson County, Mississippi

260 acres described as: SE/4 of NE/4 in Section 23, T6S-R8W; N/2 of NE/4 of NE/4 and NW/4 of and NE/4 of Section 23, T6S-R8W; and S/2 of SE/4 and SE/4 of SW/4 of Section 14, T6S-R8W.

 

 

 

Children of Lazaro T. Lopez and Eurilda ‘Lily’ Seal

 

Wilda J. Lopez

Wilda Josephine Lopez (1899-1977) was born at Biloxi, Mississippi on October 10, 1899.  She attended Biloxi Central School and graduated with the Class of 1915 and chosen Class Astrologer  Wilda married Dr. James Edward Wallace (1877-1942) at Nativity B.V.M. on January 9, 1920 with Reverend Alphone Ketels officiating.(The Daily Herald, May 6, 1915, p. 1 and Harrison Co., Mississippi MRB, 31, p. 493)

Dr. Wallace was a native of Natchitoches, Louisiana. He came to Biloxi in 1914, and was affiliated with Dr. Hyman M. Folkes (1871-1926), the husband of Teresa Lopez (1873-1951). Mrs. Folkes was Wilda’s aunt. Miss Wilda Lopez was the valedictorian of the 1915 Class of Biloxi High School and delivered an appropriate speech to her nine classmates and audience. She went on to study at Randolph Macon College at Lynchburg, Virginia. Wilda’s other siblings were: Clara Lopez Tarr Froede (1902-1936), Beverly Lopez Berggren (1904-1991), Florian Seal Lopez (1911-1957), and John Beverly Lopez (1915-1970).(The Daily Herald, May 29, 1915, p. 1)

It appears that Wilda and Dr. Wallace divorced before 1932 as he married Lillian Grace Madere  (1911-1992) in Harrison County, Mississippi and she married Lynden Bowring.

 

Bowring Home-900 East Beach Drive-Biloxi

[Courtesy of Jon Kroninger-April 2013]

 

 

Lynden Bowring (1889-1980)

Lynden Bowring(1889-1980) was born in Los Angeles, California on May 13, 1889. He made his livelihood as an attorney and is rumored to have made money in the movie business at Hollywood. Lynden was described as a loner and eccentric.(Bache Whitlock, Ocean Springs, Mississippi, October 19, 2000)

 

During his life, Bowring was married three times. He had two children with his first wife, but they as well as his spouse, preceded him in death. His second wife was Dorothy Bosche, the daughter of John C. Bosche and Adelaide Bosche.  Dorothy was born in Utah.  In 1920, she and Lynden were living with her parents in Los Angeles.  Their son, Robert Lynden Bowring  (1920-1942), was born at Los Angeles.  Robert L. Bowring died in the Biloxi Hospital on March 7, 1942.  He had been living with Mrs. Eurilda Seal on Biloxi’s West Beach until he had relocated to Pascagoula, Mississippi in February 1942. (1920 Los Angeles Co. Federal Census T625_108, p. 4A, ED 228 and The Daily Herald, March 9, 1942)

 

Circa 1925, Lynden married Miss Wilda Lopez (1899-1977), the daughter of Lazro Lopez II (1877-1918) and Eurilda Seal (1879-1966).  Wilda Lopez was the valedictorian of the 1915 Class of Biloxi High School and delivered an appropriate speech to her nine classmates and audience. She went on to study at Randolph Macon College at Lynchburg, Virginia. Wilda’s other siblings were: Clara Lopez Tarr Froede (1902-1936), Beverly Lopez Berggren (1904-1991), Florian Seal Lopez (1911-1957), and John Beverly Lopez (1915-1970).(The Daily Herald, May 29, 1915, p. 1)

 

Prior to her marriage to Lynden Bowring, Wilda Lopez had married Dr. James Edward Wallace (1877-1942) in the Roman Catholic Church at Biloxi, Mississippi on January 9, 1920.  Dr. Wallace was a native of Natchitoches, Louisiana. He came to Biloxi in 1914, and was affiliated with Dr. Hyman M. Folkes (1871-1926), the husband of Teresa Lopez (1873-1951). Mrs. Folkes was Wilda’s aunt.(HARCO, Ms. MRB 31, p. 493)

 

In addition to his law practice, Lynden Bowring was affiliated with C.T. Bowring and Co. Ltd. of London, England, a shipping firm. He also owned a one-half interest in the Carlton Apartments on Union Drive in Los Angeles.

 

Lynden also owned the Rum Runner, a large motor yacht (65 feet in length) and a relict of the Prohibition era. It was once moored in front of their East Beach home at Biloxi.  After relocating to Ocean Springs, Lynden built a boat house and slip for it. The vessel was never utilized, but full-time employee maintained the craft.(Bache Whitlock, October 19, 2000)

 

Ocean Springs 

In August 1969, Hurricane Camille destroyed the Bowrings’ Biloxi home. In 1970?, The Bowrings relocated to Ocean Springs. Bruce Duckett remembers that  Mr. Bowring as an elderly gentleman approaching him to buy his home on Hellmers Lane. Lynden wanted a site on the Inner harbor at Ocean Springs for the Wilda B (akaRum Runner).  He convinced a local golfer to relocate to Gulf Hills and bought his home and land at 207 General Pershing Avenue.(Bruce Duckett, October 10, 2000)

 

In July 1970, Wilda Lopez Bowring acquired from Lester B. Larson and Jennie C. Larson the following property in Ocean Springs. Their residence address was 207 General Pershing Avenue.

 

Commencing at the southwest corner of Hellmers Lane and General Pershing Avenue: Go south 92.5 feet to the POB. Thence south 331.5 feet along the west margin of General Pershing Avenue to the waters edge of the OS small craft harbor, thence N 70 degrees 20’ W 200 feet along the waters edge of the small craft harbor to the fence line dividing the Larson and Howell property; thence N 19 degrees 20’E 257 feet along an old fence line; thence S84 degrees 20’E 128 feet along an old fence line to the point of beginning. Said land lying in Section 37, T7S-R8W.(JXCO, Ms. Land Deed Bk. 381, pp. 587-588)

 

In May 1971, Mrs. Bowring acquired from Earl W. Paul and Ilsedore Paul, the following: Commencing at the southwest corner of Hellmers Lane and General Pershing Avenue: Go south 92.5 feet; thence N84 degrees 20’W 128 feet along a wire fence; thence north 66.3 feet along a wire fence to the south margin of Hellmers Lane; thence N84 degreesE127 feet along the south margin of Hellmer’s Lane to the POB.(JXCO, Ms. Land Deed Bk. 401, pp.338-339)

 

There was a rental house on one of the lots. A house fire caused by lightening destroyed most of their home September 13, 1977. Mr. Bowring was led out of the burning house by Alice Duckett. Mrs. Wilda L. Bowring suffered burns and smoke inhalation and died in late October as a result of injuries from the conflagration. She was a member of the Colonial Dames, Daughters of the American Revolution, Les Masques carnival club, and the Biloxi Yacht Club. Wilda was a member of St. Alphonsus Catholic Church.  Her corporal remains were interred in the Biloxi Cemetery.(The Ocean Springs Record, September 15, 1977, pp. 1-2 and The Daily Herald, October 27, 1977, p. A-2)

 

Mrs. Wilda Bowring left an estate valued at approximately $300,000. Her principal beneficiaries were: Patricia T. Leavitt of Ocean Springs, Mississippi and Barbara T. Kroningen of Downers Grove, Illinois, (JXCO, Ms. Chancery Court Cause No. 33566)

 

In June 1978, Lynden Bowring, executor of the Estate of Wilda Lopez Bowring, sold to Charles E. Carr and Joy R. Carr, the two parcels above.  In 1996, Dr. William Pontius built a large home, “Lattiude”, at Hellmers Lane on the former site of Bowring’s boathouse. .(JXCO, Ms. Land Deed Bk. 621, p. 501).

 

When Lynden Bowring expired on April 8, 1980, he was living at his apartment house at 414 East Howard Avenue in Biloxi. He willed his real estate at 900 East Beach Biloxi to Beverly Lopez Berggren, his sister-in-law, and Patricia Tarr Leavitt, his niece-in-law.  Mr. Bowring was laid to rest in the Biloxi Cemetery.(HARCO, Ms. 2nd JD Chancery Court Cause No. 9853)

 

        

 Clara Seal Lopez [1902-1936]

[Courtesy of Jon Kroninger-April 2013]

Clara Seal Lopez (1902-1936) was born at Biloxi, Mississippi in July 1902.  She eloped with Leslie R. Tarr (1897-1972), a native of Glendale, California.  They were married at Ocean Springs, Mississippi on December 8, 1918 by Judge Orin D. Davidson (1872-1938).  Clara was a student at Sophie Newcomb College when she met Leslie R. Tarr, then a sailor stationed at the Gulfport Naval Training Station.  When Mr. Tarr left the service in 1919, he and Clara returned to his California home where he was a journalist for a Los Angeles newspaper.(JXCO, Ms. MRB 11, p. 573 and The Daily Herald, September 6, 1919, p. 4

 

At Glendale, California, Leslie and Clara L. Tarr were domiciled on South Glendale Avenue and residing next to Orin W. Tarr (1878-1920+) and Dr. Donna J. Talbot Tarr, Leslie’s parents.  Orin Tarr was a house carpenter and automobile salesman while Donna Talbot Tarr was an obstetrician.  Before Clara and Leslie R. Tarr divorce in California circa 1922, they had two daughters:  Patricia J. Tarr Leavitt (1919-2006) and Barbara Tarr Kroninger (1921-1983).  Before 1930, Leslie R. Tarr had remarried Christine L. Tarr (1902-1993), a life insurance actuary.  Leslie R. Tarr became a lawyer.   He was a resident of Santa Barbara, California in 1941 and passed on at Newport Beach, California in July 1972.  Christine L. Tarr died there in December 1993.(1920 and 1930 Los Angeles, Co., California Federal Census T625_102, p. 7B, ED 29 and R128, p. 12B, ED 990)

 

Patricia T. Leavitt, Clyde M. Leavitt, and Leslie Leavitt [baby]

[Courtesy of Jon Kroninger-April 2013]

 

Patricia J. Tarr 

Patricia Jeanne Tarr Leavitt (1919-2006) was born at Glendale, California on November 29, 1919.  On June 7, 1941, she married Clyde M. Leavitt (1910-2002) at Mobile, Alabama.  He was a naval architect from Syracuse, New York and the son of Clyde Leavitt and Patricia McGowen.  Miss Tarr was a student at the University of Mississippi when they met.  Mr. Leavitt was employed at Ingalls Shipbuilding Corporation in Pascagoula, Mississippi at the time.  They acquired their marraige license in Jackson County, Mississippi in June 1941.  Two daughters were born from this union.(Clara L. D’ Aquilla, The Daily Herald, June 12, 1941, p. 6 and  and JXCO, Ms. MRB 33, p. 550)

 

In April 1974, Patricia Tarr and Clyde M. Leavitt acquired Lots 1 and 2 of Block 50 Gulf Hills from W.H. Mecom Jr.  They sold their residence at 13901 Puerto Drive in Gulf Hills in November 1994 to Phillip L. Severson Jr. and relocated to Las Cruces, New Mexico.  Patricia T. Leavitt suffered a stroke in 2000 and expired at Las Cruces on August 20, 2006.  Clyde preceded her in death passing in New Mexico on August 20, 2002.(JXCO, Ms. Land Deed Bk. 495, p. 549 and Bk. 1053, p. 156)  

 

Barbara Tarr

Barbara Tarr Kroninger (1921-1983) was born at Biloxi, Mississippi on February 15, 1921, while her had come here from California for a visit with her family.  Barbara Tarr was a stewardess for Delta Airlines and during WWII had been a Navy nurse.  On September 26, 1946 at the Catholic Chapel at Great Lakes Naval Training Station, Illinois, she married USN Lt. (j.g.) Nolan R. Kroninger Jr. (1920-2003), a native of Cowden, Illinois.  He was aboard the USS Lexington when it was sunk by Japanese aircraft in 1942.  The Kronigers eventually settled at Downers Grove, Illinois.(The Daily Herald, February 18, 1921, p. 3, October 7, 1946, p. 6 and Clara L. D’Aquilla, October 23, 2000)

 

Patricia and Barbara Tarr spent many holidays and summers at Biloxi with Lily Seal Lopez, their loving grandmother.  Mrs. Lopez lived at New Orleans, but maintained a residence at 301 Hopkins Boulevard to share time with her daughter and granddaughters.  The Tarr girls were chaperoned by a Black maid.(The Daily Herald, September 15, 1936, p. 2)

 

On May 28, 1929, Clara Lopez Tarr married Paul O. Froede (1896-1968) in New York on May 28, 1929.  Mr. Froede was a native of Brooklyn and was born of German immigrant parents.  He had met Clara Lopez Tarr as he had been a regular visitor to Biloxi.   The newlyweds planned a six-weeks honeymoon trip through New England and Canada before returning to Biloxi.  In 1930, Paul O. Froded made his livelihood in New York City as superintendent of manufacturing for the the Reigel Sack Company located in the Woolsworth Building.  The Froedes were domiciled in Brooklyn.(The Daily Herald, June 5, 1929, p. 2 and 1930 Kings Co., New York Federal Census R1509, p. 12A, ED 1141)

 

Clara Lopez Froede was operated on in New Orleans in early September 1936.  She expired in the Crescent City from complications of her surgery on September 23, 1936.  Her corporal remains were sent to Biloxi for burial in the Biloxi City Cemetery.  Before 1942, Paul O. Froede remarried to Alice Ruth Froede (1918-1992).  They were living in Teaneck, New Jersey during WW II.  Paul O. Froede passed at Waco, Texas in August 1968.  Alice Ruth joined him on May 4, 1992 while at resident of Mesquite, Texas.(The Daily Herald, September 23, 1936, p. 8)

 

Lazaro J. Lopez (1907-1968)

[from The Beacon Glow-1924 Biloxi High School Annual]

 

Lazaro 'Laz' Joseph Lopez (1907-1968) was born at Biloxi, Mississippi on March 20, 1907.  He married Marjorie Donovan (1910-2010), the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. R.F. Donovan of New Orleans, at St. Rita’s Catholic Church in the Crescent City on October 10, 1929.  Marjorie was born on November 4, 1910 at Shreveport, Louisiana to Richard Donovan and Kathryn Canale Donovan.(The Sun Herald, January 12, 2010, p. A4)

 

Children:  Marjorie Joan Lopez (1930-1930); Marjorie Lopez (1932-1984) m. Dr. James E.  Alexander; Lazaro J. Lopez Jr. (1934-2002) m. Charlene Barnes Wilson; and Kathryn Lopez (b. 1943) m. Buris Premeaux Jr. (1939-2001), the son of Buris Premeaux (1915-1974) and Melody Prevost Premeaux.

 

1932

In late December 1932, Laz Lopez and Jack [John] Lopez discovered an Indian mound on their West Beach property.  Joseph Paulos [Poulos?], an amateur archaeologist, and local Historian, Anthony V. Ragusin, examined the find which consisted of human bones and pottery.(The Daily Herald, December 31, 1932, p. 1)

 

Laz was retired from civil service at Keesler Air Force Base when he expired at his Ocean Springs home on September 8, 1968.  He had attended Springhill College at Mobile, Alabama and Loyola University.  Laz was a member of St. Alphonsus Catholic Church in Ocean Springs, Mississippi and active in the Knights of Columbus.(The Daily Herald, September 9, 1968, p. 2)

 

Marjorie Donovan Lopez loved working in her yard and fed the scores of birds, rabbits and turtles that visited her home in Gulf Hills in Ocean Springs.  However, Lopez wouldn't tolerate some behavior.  Her daughter, Kathryn Lopez Premeaux, recalls how turtles would bang their shells against the patio door when they wanted food. But if Lopez found two turtles together during mating season, she separated them immediately.  Premeaux laughs when she recalls that story about her mother, who died Sunday at age 99 after an extended illness.

 

Mrs. Lopez was born in Shreveport, Louisiana, and met her late husband, Laz Lopez Sr., when she visited Biloxi during the summer while she was growing up. They were part of the Lopez family that first opened a seafood factory in Biloxi.  The couple lived in Chicago, Biloxi and other parts of Mississippi before settling in Ocean Springs in the 1960s. 

 

Marjorie Lopez was a good cook and made tasty sandwiches, and cucumber and pimento cheese sandwiches were two of her specialties. Lopez was an avid reader who was interested in national politics, her daughter said. She also liked watching tennis on TV, particularly Pete Sampras.  Lopez also was a devout Catholic. 

 

Premeaux said her mother didn't tell people what to do but was more than willing to listen to people when they needed her.  "She didn't force advice on you, but if you went to her with a problem, she was a very good listener," Premeaux said, adding that just because she listened, she didn't necessarily take your side, even if you were family.  "She was incredibly, mercilessly objective," Premeaux said.(The Sun Herald, January 12, 2010)

 

[L-R: Beverly [Bea] Lopez Berggren; Dinah Leavitt Swan; and Leslie Leavitt]

[Courtesy of Jon Kroninger-April 2013]

 

Beverly Lopez

Beverly Lopez  (1904-1991), called Bea and Lillie, was born March 12, 1904 at Biloxi, Mississippi.  She was educated at the Sacred Heart Academy and Mississippi Southern College.  She married Howard S. Born in January 1926.  Miss Lopez then married Oscar E. Berggren (1892-1964).  She had no children.  They Berggrens resided at Biloxi.  Bea was a charter member of Les Masques Carnival Association.   She died at Biloxi on October 26, 1991.(The Sun Herald, October 29, 1991)

1092 West Beach-Biloxi, Mississippi

 

When Beverly Lopez Berggren passed, she legated her interest in the Live Oak property on East Beach Drive in Biloxi to Patricia T. Leavitt.  Clara Lopez Campbell D’Aquilla (b. 1936) was her executrix. Mrs. D’Aquilla was legated Mrs. Berggren’s home at 1092 West Beach Boulevard in Biloxi.(HARCO, Ms. 2nd JD Chancery Court Cause No. P-2077B-March 1993)

 

Mrs. Leavitt was the daughter of Leslie R. Tarr (1897-1972) and Clara Lopez.  He resided at Newport Beach, California.  Clara Lopez married Leslie R. Tarr in Ocean Springs, Mississippi on December 8, 1918.  Judge O.D. Davidson performed the ceremony.(JXCO, Ms. MRB 11, p. 573)  She lived at 13901 Puerto Drive in Gulf Hills.

 

Patricia Tarr married Clyde M. Leavitt.  In April 1974, bought Lots 1 and 2 of Block 50 Gulf Hills from W.H. Mecom Jr.(JXCO, Ms. Land Deed Bk. 495, p. 549)

 

Sold in November 1994 to Phillip L. Severson Jr.  Leavitts moved to Las Cruces, New Mexico.(JXCO, Ms. Land Deed Bk. 1053, p. 156)

 

Florian S. Lopez

Florian Seal Lopez (1911-1957) married Maxine Stivers.  Two children: Michael Lopez and Florian J. Lopez (1954-1954).

 

Florian expired at Biloxi on March 11, 1957 at his home 941 East Beach.

 

 

John B. Lopez

John Beverly Lopez (1915-1970) was born February 7, 1915 at Biloxi, Mississippi.  He married Juanita 'Abbey' Eckles (1913-1995), a native of Hattiesburg, Mississippi on January 11, 1936.  Abbey was a graduate of the University of Alabama [Birmingham].   She resided at Biloxi for seventy years and was a member of the Nativity B.V.M. Cathedral parish; Les Masquees Carnival association; the Scottish Klan McGregor and the Republican Party.(The Daily Herald, June 3, 1936, p. 10 and The Sun Herald, February 22, 1995, p. C2)

 

John and Abbey E. Lopez lived at 1324 West Beach in Biloxi and reared their four children in Biloxi: Clara Seal Lopez (1936-2014) m. Paul F. Weisend, Thomas M. Campbell, and Sylvester John D’Aquilla Jr. (1937-2017); Beverly Juanita Lopez (b. 1943-pre-2014); John 'Jack' M. Lopez; and Helen Lopez m. Marcel Joseph Languirand Jr.

 

John B. Lopez operated L. Lopez and Sons Inc., a seafood packing company until it was destroyed in Hurricane Betsy-September 1965.  He was also a cattleman at Pointe a la Hache, Plaquemines Parish, Louisiana and a director of the First National Bank of Biloxi.  Mr. lopez expired in Howard Memorial Hospital at Biloxi on March 20, 1970.  Abbey E. Lopez lived until February 20, 1995.  Their corporal remains were interred at Southern Memorial Park in west Biloxi.(The Daily Herald, March 21, 1970, p. 2 and The Sun Herald, February 22, 1995, p. C2)

 

Children

 

Clara S. Lopez

 

Clara Seal Lopez (1936-2014) was born at Biloxi, Mississippi on November 13, 1936.  She was known to many as "Claire," passed away at noon on January 9, 2014. She was 77 years of age. Ms. D'aquilla grew up in Plaquemines Parish, Louisiana, and attended boarding school at the Sacred Heart Academy in New Orleans. As a child and teenager, she spent weekends and summers in Biloxi with her extended family.

 

Paul F. Weisend          

In 1954, Claire became engaged to Paul F. Weisend (1928-2012), a native of McKees Rock, Pennsylvania.  In April 1954, Paul and Claire applied for a marriage license in Harrison County, Mississippi.  He was in the USAF at San Antonio, Texas and Claire was residing at Pointe a' la Hache, Plaquemines, Parish, Louisiana.  It appears that their marriage never occurred.[The Daily Herald, April 8, 1954, p. 14]

 

Thomas M. Campbell

 

 

Scholar

Claire graduated from the University of Southern Mississippi in 1962 with a BA in history and English and later earned an MA in history there. She was the first graduate of USM to earn a 4.0 average. In 1971 she earned a PhD in history from Tulane. Her profession was teaching. When she was still "Ms. Campbell," she spent most of the seventies as an English and history teacher at Sacred Heart Girls' School in Biloxi, where she was much-loved and highly-regarded. She likewise held great affection for her students. She supervised the school yearbook, and her students voted her star teacher. Ms. D'aquilla often remembered her years there as her happiest, professionally. After Sacred Heart, she moved on to Mississippi Gulf Coast Community College, where she was a professor of English and history until retiring in 1996.

 

Though she was an accomplished professional woman, Claire was also a devoted wife and mother. Ms. D'aquilla held membership in several professional organizations; Kappa Delta Sorority; and Les Masquees Carnival Association. A lifelong Catholic, she belonged to St. Alphonsus Parish in Ocean Springs, and then later Nativity, BVM, in Biloxi.

 

 

Ms. D'aquilla is preceded in death by her parents, John Beverly Lopez and Juanita Abbey Eckles Lopez; by one daughter, Claire Patricia Campbell (1970-1995); and by one sister, Beverly Juanita Lopez (1943-?.

 

Survivors include her husband, Sylvester "Sal" D'aquilla, Jr., of Biloxi; sister, Helen Lopez Languirand of Biloxi; brother, John (Beth) Lopez of Gretna, LA; daughters, Carroll Campbell and Abbey D'Aquilla of Biloxi; daughters, Rose (Mohammed) Pouriragi and Holly Murray of Long Beach and Daphne (Timothy) Stewart of Slidell, LA; grandchildren, Kay (David) Orgeron, Lyda and Maddy Murray and Dylan, Tyler, and Kyle Stewart; and nephews, Shawn Lopez and Jack Lopez, both of Gretna. 

 

A rosary will be said for Ms. D'aquilla on Tuesday, January 14th, 2014 at 10:00 a.m., directly followed by a Mass of Christian Burial at 11:00 a.m., at Nativity, BVM Cathedral in Biloxi. The Howard Avenue Chapel of Bradford-O'Keefe Funeral Home is in charge of arrangements.

 

Sylvester J. D’Aquilla Jr.

Sylvester 'Sal' John D'Aquilla, Jr. (1937-2017), age 80 years, of Biloxi, passed away Sunday, September 3, 2017. Sylvester was a native of Woodville, Mississsipi and a resident of the coast for over 50 years. He graduated from the University of Southern Mississippi. He was a math professor for 6 years with USM before accepting a position with Mississippi Gulf Coast Community College. He was employed 32 years with MGCCC as an instructor and was appointed academic dean for the MGCCC Keesler Center, from which he retired. Sal was a member of Nativity BVM Parish and of B.P.O.E. No. 606 in Biloxi. He is preceded in death by his wife, Clara Lopez D'Aquilla; daughter, Claire Campbell; parents, Sylvester J. D'Aquilla, Sr. and Alma Stutzman D'Aquilla; and brother, Henry D'Aquilla.

 

Survivors include five daughters, Rose (Moe) Pouriraji, Holly Murray, Daphne (Tim) Stewart, Carroll Campbell and Abbey D'Aquilla; sister, Yvonne (Thomas) Dooley; sister-in-law, Carolyn D'Aquilla, seven grand-children, Kay (David) Orgeron, Alexis Pouriraji, Lyda Murray, Madelyn Murray, Dylan Stewart, Tyler Stewart and Kyle Stewart, and great-grand-daughter, Parvane Orgeron. A Mass of Christian burial will be held at Nativity BVM Cathedral on Friday, September 8, 2017 at 11:00 a.m. Friends may visit from 10:00 a.m. until mass time. Interment will follow at Biloxi City Cemetery. The Howard Avenue Chapel of Bradford-O'Keefe Funeral Home is in charge of arrangements.[The Sun Herald, September 6, 2017] 

 

 

 

REFERENCES:

 

Jerome Lepre, Catholic Church Records Diocese of Biloxi, Mississippi, Volume I, (Catholic Dioceses of Biloxi: Biloxi, Mississippi-1991).

 

Harrison County, Mississippi Circuit Court, Cause No. 4665, “The State of Mississippi v. Laz Lopez, et al,"-September 1906.

Harrison County, Mississippi Circuit Court, Cause No. 5688, “The Estate of Laz Lopez"-1918.

Harrison County, Mississippi Chancery Court 2nd Judicial District, Cause No. 9853, “The Estate of Lynden Bowring", 1980.

Harrison County, Mississippi Chancery Court 2nd Judicial District Cause No. P-2077B, "The Estate of Beverly Lopez Berggren”, March 1993.

 

Journals 

The Biloxi Herald,“Death of young Henzelena”, November 6, 1897.

The Biloxi Daily Herald,“Local and Personal”, December 14, 1898.

The Biloxi Daily Herald,“Local and Personal”, December 15, 1898.

The Daily Herald,“Bank of Biloxi”, September 29, 1909.

The Daily Herald, “Officers elected in big concern [Columbia Ice and Power Company]”, January 18, 1910.

The Daily Herald,“New canning factory for Biloxi”, September 24, 1910.

The Daily Herald, “Biggest raw oyster shipper [Ulysse Desporte] sells out”, October 15, 1910.

The Daily Herald, “Ulysse Desporte buys back factory”, November 14, 1910.

The Daily Herald, “Change of manager of canning factory”, December 29, 1910.

The Daily Herald, “Dr. Wallace and Dr. Folkes are partners”, July 21, 1911.

The Daily Herald,“Kennedy-Lopez will have plant in New Orleans”, October 29, 1912.

The Daily Herald, “Public schools of Biloxi will close term May 28”, May 6, 1915.

The Daily Herald, “Biloxi will be regular depot of new barge lines”, August 19, 1913.

The Daily Herald, “Flu bad in New Orleans', October 22, 1918.

The Daily Herald, “Prominent mans dies in New Orleans”, October 24, 1918.

The Daily Herald, “Girl of Southern noted family joins husband in Los Angeles”, September 6, 1919.

The Daily Herald, “Prominent Biloxi couple married”, January 10, 1920.

The Daily Herald,“Born-Lopez”, January 13, 1926.

The Daily Herald,“Florian Seal dies suddenly”, December 12, 1927.

The Daily Herald, “Froede-Tarr nuptials”, June 5, 1929.

The Daily Herald, “Lopez-Donovan”, October 28, 1929.

The Daily Herald, “Funeral of Lopez baby”, June 30, 1930.

The Daily Herald, "Locate Indian mound on Biloxi property", December 31, 1932

The Daily Herald, “Lopez-Eckles”, June 3, 1936.

The Daily Herald, “Mrs. Florian Seal dies”, September 12, 1936.

The Daily Herald, “Miss Tarr complimented”, September 15, 1936.

The Daily Herald,“Return to New York”, September 15, 1936.

The Daily Herald,“Mrs. Paul Froede [Clara Lopez] dies”, September 25, 1936.

The Daily Herald,“Funeral of Mrs. Paul Froede”, September 25, 1936.

The Daily Herald,“Miss Patricia Tarr marries”, June 12, 1941.

The Daily Herald, "R.L. Bowring dies", March 9, 1942.

The Daily Herald, “Dr. James Wallace World War Captain dies at Biloxi”, October 28, 1942.

The Daily Herald, “Kroninger-Tarr”, October 7, 1946.

The Daily Herald, “W.P. Kennedy Sr. is buried Sunday with Catholic services”, December 24, 1951.

The Daily Herald, “Infant Florian Lopez”, April 25, 1954.

The Daily Herald, “Florian Lopez”, March 11, 1957.

The Daily Herald, “Capt. Berggren Taken By Death”, January 6, 1964.

The Daily Herald, “Know Your Coast”, “The Biloxi House With The English Fence”, November 5, 1964.

The Daily Herald,“Laz Lopez”, September 9, 1968.

The Daily Herald,“Rites pending for Banking, Seafood leader”, March 2, 1970.

The Daily Herald, “Mr. Wilda Lopez Bowring”, October 27, 1977.

The Daily Herald,“Mrs. Kathryn Wambsgans”, January 6, 1984.

The New Orleans Item, 'St. Mary Parish puts every acre to work...', February 3, 1918.

The Ocean Springs Record, “Saved From Fire”, September 15, 1977.

The Sun Herald, “Marjorie Lopez Alexander”, August    , 1984

The Sun Herald, “Mrs. Beverly Berggren”, October 29, 1991.

The Sun Herald, 'Mrs. Juanita 'Abbey' Lopez', February 22, 1995. p. C2.

The Sun Herald, Buris Premeaux”, April     , 2001.

The Sun Herald,Laz Lopez Jr.”, September 23, 2002.

The Sun Herald,Mrs. Marjorie Donovan Lopez”, January 12, 2010.

The Sun Herald,Marjorie Donovan Lopez-Lopez loved cooking-gardening”, January 12, 2010.

The Sun Herald,“Clara Seal Lopez Campbell D'Aquilla”, January 12, 2014.

The Sun Herald,“Sylvester J. D'Aquilla”, September 6, 2017.

 

The Times-Picayune, 'Prominent businessman [Laz Lopez] in death list', October 25, 1918, p. 2.

 

Personal Communication:

Clara L. D’Aquilla-telephone conversation on October 18, 2000 at Biloxi, Mississippi.

Clara L. D’Aquilla-interview at 1092 Beach Blvd. on October 23, 2000, at Biloxi, Mississippi.

Cause No. 9853-Estate of Lynden Bowring-1980

Patricia Tarr Leavitt, executrix of his estate. Married three times. First wife died, divorced second. Two children born of first marriage, but children died.  Wife preceded him in death.  No children.  Left property at 900 East Beach Biloxi to Beverly Lopez Berggren, his sister-in-law, and Patricia Tarr Leavitt, his niece-in-law.  Bowring affiliated with C.T. Bowring and Co. Ltd. of London, England.  Owned a one-half interest in the Carlton Apartments on Union Drive in Los Angeles.  Bowring died 4-8-1980.

__________________________________________________________________________________________________

ARNAUD LOPEZ

Arnaud Lopez (1880-1948) was born at Biloxi, Mississippi on August 15, 1880.  On June 15, 1909, he married Nellie May Gorman (1890-1952), the daughter of Michael Gorman and Catherine Walsh.  Nellie M. Gorman was a native of Vicksburg while her parents were born in Northern Ireland and New York respectively.  She was educated at Vicksburg in the convent school.  Arnaud Lopez and Nellie May Gorman celebrated their nuptial ceremony at St. Paul’s Catholic Church in Vicksburg, Mississippi, the former home of his bride.(The Daily Herald, June 5, 1909, p. 4 and January 15, 1952, p. 8)

 

Two sons: Arnaud Gorman Lopez (1910-1986) m. Sarah Talbert (1916-2002); and James G. Lopez m.

 

Bank of Biloxi

Board of Directors in 1909.(The Daily Herald, September 29, 1909, p. 3)

Rowena Lopez

Arnaud Lopez was appointed by his father in his last will of June 1903,“as guardian for my minor children and direct that he shall not have to give bond as such guardian, nor be required to file vouchers with his reports or annual accounts and that he shall not be chargeable with any interest on the personal assets of such wards in his hands but shall be chargeable with the corpus and actual income from such estates.”

 

Seafood business

Lopez-Desporte Packing Company

The Lopez-Desporte Packing Company was organized in 1911 in St. Bernard Parish, Louisiana with a capitalization of $100,000.  Arnaud Lopez was president, Ullysse Desporte, vice-president with H.B. Rush, the secretary and treasurer.  Lazaro Lopez and Charles F. Greiner served on the company’s board of directors.(The Daily Herald, August 7, 1911, p. 1)

 

Biloxi home

 

Captain Gorman’s death

In early October 1921, Captain James Gorman, brother of Nellie May G. Lopez, expired at Vicksburg, Mississippi.  Captain Gorman was a former Captain in the Mississippi National Guard and had made the Guard’s annual encampment at Biloxi on several occasions.  James Gorman was a member of the Warren County Board of Supervisor at the time of his demise.  Arnaud and Nellie May Lopez and children attended Captain Gorman funeral.  They were accompanied by Harry W. Barber and his spouse.  Mr. Barber was Captain Gorman’s brother-in-law.(The Daily Herald, October 3, 1921, p. 3) 

 

CHILDREN

ARNAUD O. LOPEZ

Arnaud O'Gorman Lopez (1910-1986) was born at Biloxi, Mississippi.  On June 22, 1941, he was a sergeant in the military when he married Sarah Talbert (1916-2002), the daughter of Joseph E. Talbert (1874-1960) and Elise Gary Talbert Boatner Lamkins of Monroe, Louisiana.  Sarah Talbert was born at Memphis, Tennessee.  She expired on December 12, 2002 at the home of James C. Lopez, her nephew, in Opelousas, St. Landry Parish, Louisiana.  She was survived by James C. Lopez, his wife, Barbara 'Babs' Lopez, and Mary Dupuis, sister-in-law, all of Opelousas, Louisiana.  Her corporal remain were interred in the Biloxi City Cemetery.(The Daily Herald, June 23, 1941, p. 7 and The Sun Herald, December 14, 2002)

 

Arnaud O. Lopez graduated from Biloxi High School in 1927.  He was an outstanding athelete and was selected All-State and All Big Eight for several years.  Arnaud matriculated to Loyola University at NOLA and played football for Clark Shaughnessey.  When the Loyola Wolfpack defeated the Loyola of Chicago Ramblers at NOLA in November 1927, young Lopez was described as "[his] southpaw passes were almost uncanny in in their direction and length."(The Daily Herald, November 21, 1927, p. 5)

 

Military

Graduating from the Jesuit school at NOLA with a Bachelor of Philosophy degree, he joined the ranks of professional football for one season and worked as a engineer in the US War Department.  His military career began in 1940 when he enlisted in the Mississippi National Guard as a Private.  During WWII, Arnaud O. Lopez served in the 3rd Army, 83rd Division commanded by General George Patton.  Arnaud landed at Normandy in June 1943 and was discharged from the US Army in 1945 with the rank of Major.  He won the Silver Star and other military badges for his meritorious service in the European Theatre.(The Daily Herald, October 22, 1949, p. 6)

 

[L-R: James G. Lopez; Sylvia Schaffer; Arnaud G. Lopez; and John Gorman Schaffer]

Lawyer

After returning from military service, Arnaud O. Lopez attended Louisiana State University and studied law.  In 1949, he began his law practice in Biloxi, Mississipi, joing Howard McDonnell in the Barq Building on West Howard Avenue. In April 1955, Mr. Lopez announced his candidacy for District Attorney for the 2nd Judicial District which encompassed George, Harrison, Hancock, Jackson, and Stone County, Mississippi.(The Daily Herald, October 22, 1949, p. 6 and April 29, 1955, p. 13)

 

In January 1961, Arnaud O. Lopez was appointed the City of Biloxi's  prosecuting attorney in the Laz Quave administration.  He was appointed attorney for the Harrison County Board of Supervisors in January 1963.(The Daily Herald, January 7, 1963, p. 1)

 

 

JAMES G. LOPEZ

[L-R: James G. Lopez; Sylvia Schaffer; Arnaud G. Lopez; and John Gorman Schaffer]

James O' Gorman Lopez (1913-pre 1948) was  baptized on December 14, 1913 at Nativity B.V.M.  His sponsors were Noreta Lopez and Charles A. Schaffer of Vicksburg, brother-in-law of Nellie Gorman Lopez.  A graduate of Biloxi High School and Loyola University (NOLA).  Outstanding lineman in high school and college.  Taught school and worked in post office until he entered medical school at Ole Miss in Oxford in 1937.(The Daily Herald, December 15, 1913, p. 8 and September 11, 1937, p. 12)

 

In April 1938, James G. Lopez was elected president of the Medical Club at the University of Mississippi.  Its membership included all medical students.  At this time, Miriam Wallace, the daughter of Dr. George Wallace of Biloxi, was elected secretary of the Sophomore Class.(The Daily Herald, April 2, 1938, p. 5)

 

Dr. James O' Gorman Lopez graduated from Tulane Medical School on June 11, 1941.(The Daily Herald, June 12, 1941, p. 6)

 

Married and had son, James C. Lopez of Franklin, Louisiana who had relocated to Opelousas, Louisiana by 2002.

 

Depression

 

Vicksburg

Circa 1936, Arnaud and Nellie G. Lopez relocated from Biloxi to Vicksburg, Mississippi.  He died on August 18, 1948 at Franklin, Louisiana while visiting Mrs. James Lopez, his daughter-in-law. 

 

REFERENCES:

Jerome Lepre, Catholic Church Records Diocese of Biloxi, Mississippi, Volume I, (Catholic Dioceses of Biloxi: Biloxi, Mississippi-1991).

The Daily Herald, “Lopez-Gorman”, June 5, 1909.

The Daily Herald, “Bank of Biloxi”, September 29, 1909.

The Daily Herald, “Biloxi News Paragraphs of Interest”, May 23, 1910.

The Daily Herald, “Biloxians form new canning company”, August 7, 1911.

The Daily Herald, “Lopez baby christened”, December 15, 1913.

The Daily Herald, “Recent Chancery decisions, July 23, 1915.

The Daily Herald, “Capt. Gorman died yesterday”, October 3, 1921.

The Daily Herald, “Wolfpack rallies behind Jr. Lopez to beat ramblers”, November 21, 1927.

The Daily Herald, “James Lopez leaving”, September 11, 1937.

The Daily Herald, “Biloxians honroed at University of Mississippi”, April 2, 1938.

The Daily Herald, “Dr. Lopez graduates”, June 12, 1941.  .

The Daily Herald, “Lopez-Talbert”, June 23, 1941.

The Daily Herald, “Lopez funeral today”, August 20, 1948.

The Daily Herald, “Lopez now practicing law in Biloxi”, October 22, 1949.

The Daily Herald, “Mrs. A. Lopez Sr. dies in Vicksburg, burial in Biloxi”, January 15, 1952.

The Daily Herald, “Lopez offers for District Attorney”, April 29, 1955.

The Daily Herald, “Lopez new attorney for Board”, January 7, 1963.

The Sun Herald, “Sarah Talbert”, December 14, 2002.

__________________________________________________________________________________________________

ERENA A. LOPEZ 

Erena Anthony Lopez (1883-1940) was born at Biloxi, Mississippi on February ‘ 11, 1883.  She was known as ‘Rena’ and married Edward L. ‘Mickey’ Brady (1867-1939) on February 3, 1908, at Pensacola, Florida where they had gone to visit Mr. and Mrs. King.  He was a native of Ohio or Pennsylvania and the son of Thomas Brady (1834-1880+), a jeweler, and Sarah Taylor (1835-1880+), both Irish immigrants.  In 1880, Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Brady resided in Franklin, Ohio with their five children.(The Biloxi Daily Herald, February 12, 1908, p. 2 and 1880 Warren Co., Ohio Federal Census T9_1074, p. 15, ED 15)

 

The newlywed Bradys made their home in the Lazaro Lopez edifice on West Howard Avenue living with Julia Dulion Lopez and Erena’s single siblings.  By 1917, the Yergers, Noreta Lopez Yerger and Rucks Yerger, and the Caldwells, Rowena Lopez Caldwell and Philip C. Caldwell (1892-1930+), were domiciled with the Bradys on West Howard Avenue.  In January 1920, the Yergers made the decision to demolish, the magnificent Lopez domicile and erect the Yerger Building on it site. By this time four children had been born and the families relocated to bungalows in the Lopez compound on West Beach at Biloxi.(The Daily Herald, January 22, 1920, p. 3 and June 10, 1920, p. 6)

 

Jeweler and entrepreneur

Edward L. Brady had arrived at Biloxi in 1907 from Newbern, Tennessee where he had been in the jewelry business.   He had been here as early as 1900 when he had been married to Mary E. Brady (1874-1900+), a native of Ohio.  They had married in 1899.  Mr. Brady had also worked at Memphis, Tennessee before settling in Biloxi.  He came from a family of jewelers as his father, brothers, cousins and uncles were in the business.(The Daily Herald, March 11, 1908, p. 1 and 1900 Dyer Co., Tennessee Federal Census T623_1568, p. 10A, ED 21)

 

In March 1908, Mr. Brady opened his jewelry store at 415 Howard Avenue in the Lopez Building situated on the southeast corner of West Howard Avenue and Reynoir Street opposite the Lopez mansion.  He was extremely proud of his merchandise most of which had been acquired in New York City.  Among his most prized items to vend were: cut glass, sterling and plated silver including 1847 Rogers Brothers flatware, and an assortment of unique souvenir spoons especially made for him.  W.C. Duncan, a young man from Natchez who also was an optician, was associated with Edward L. Brady.(The Daily Herald, March 11, 1908, p. 1)

 

By 1913, Biloxi had three other jewelers and watchmakers: J. Neilson & Son at 421 Reynoir; C.A. Evans at 311 Lameuse; and Fred K. Warren at 200 West Howard.  Fred Bleur (1870-1933), jeweler and watchmaker, arrived in May 1917 from Foley, Alabama with his family.  Mr. Bleur had acquired the lease on the building formerly occupied by W.A. Smith of the Smith Syndicate.  The Bleur family found a residence on East Howard Avenue. (The Daily Herald, May 16, 1917, p. 3)

 

Brady advertisements

Edward L. Brady advertised his jewelry and optical business in the local Biloxi journals many times during his twenty odd years of proprietorship.  Some of these advertisements follow:

Have you seen our Dollar Window?

Come see it and take your pick

Edward Brady, Jeweler

(The Daily Herald, November 21, 1912, p. )

 

The Man, the Girl, and the Ring

We have diamonds, signets, and pretty things

Edward Brady, Jeweler

(The Daily Herald, December 14, 1912, p. 8)

 

Enter James E. Elliott and John R. Beggs

In November 1914, James E. Elliott (1886-1980), formerly employed at Pascagoula, Mississippi joined the Brady Jewelry store in Biloxi as a watchmaker and jeweler.  He was born at Havana, Hale County, Alabama and married Lucille Lundy (1892-1980), an Illinois native, in April 1916 at Harrison Co., Mississippi.  She was the daughter of James H. Lunday (1857-1910+), a retired farmer, and Minnie Cullotta Richardson (1867-1910+), both residents of Gulfport, Mississippi.  James E. Elliott and Lucille Lundy Elliott were the parents of James E. Elliott II (1917-1992) and Virginia Elliott DeFrank (1919-2001).(The Daily Herald, November 11, 1915, p. 2 and Harrison Co., Mississippi MRB 29, p. 19)

 

James E. Elliott left the employ of Brady Jewelry in the spring of 1918.  He became a partner of J.D. Crane, a jeweler located in Pascagoula, Mississippi.  By July 1918, Mr. Elliott decided to return to Biloxi and become an independent jeweler with a store on West Howard Avenue.  Mrs. Elliott and her baby had gone to Gulfport to be with family during his absence.(The Daily Herald, June 4, 1918, p. 2 and July 11, 1918, p. 3)

 

After Edward Brady retired from his jewelry business in 1929, the Gabriel Jewelry Company owned by Heyman Gabriel (1874-1929+), a German Jewish immigrant domiciled in Mobile, Alabama, acquired his stock. Mr. Gabriel’s Biloxi manager, John Rezin Beggs (1890-1972), a watchmaker and Kansas native and former owner of Beggs & George, a jewelry firm also situated in Mobile, Alabama, had a large sale.  They were preparing to move by July 1929, to the Lawrence Building at 200 West Howard Avenue situated on the northwest corner of Howard Avenue and Delaunay Street.  Manuel & Wetzell were contracted to renovate the two-story, brick structure erected in August 1911 for Charles C. Redding (1857-1926) and Joseph V. Lawrence (1867-1952) by Edwin M. Wetzell (1877-1953) for $8000.  The initial tenants of the Lawrence Building were the Guaranteed Hat & Shoe Store owned by Redding and Lawrence and Uncle Fred’s Gift Shop.  They both occupied the first floor in December 1911.(The Daily Herald, August 29, 1911, p. 8, November 27, 1911, p. 8 and May 28, 1929, p. 2)

 

It appears that in June 1927, Lawrence & Redding commenced erecting another structure juxtaposed to their 1911 building on West Howard near Delaunay.  Again Manuel & Wetzel were their chosen contractor.  The new Lawrence-Redding building was two-story and made from Cordova brick with a plate glass front.  It had a front of forty-five feet on West Howard and was eight-four feet deep.(The Daily Herald, June 27, 1927, p. 2)

 

In 1931, in addition to Elliott’s and Gabriel’s Jewelry Company, Biloxi supported the Keystone Jewelry at 117 West Howard; George Waldemeir at 116 West Howard; and Bleuer’s Gift Shop at 210 West Howard.  At this time, the Elliott’s resided at 614 East Howard Avenue.  Also in 1931, Mrs. Lucille L. Elliott vended hats from their store as the Elliott Hat Shop.(The Daily Herald, June 5, 1980, p. A2)

 

When Gabriel’s Jewelry closed in 1932, John R. Beggs became an independent watchmaker jeweler at 200 West Howard Avenue.  Dr. C.S. McAllister, an optometrist, also joined him in the new enterprise and they offered their clients a variety of jewelry and optical selections.  By 1936, J.R. Beggs had relocated to 103 Howard Avenue where he remained for many decades until his retirement.(The Daily Herald, February 22, 1932, p. 2)

 

During WWII, the James E. Elliott family moved from Biloxi to East Beach at Ocean Springs.  He expired here in June 1980.  Lucille Lunday Elliott followed him closely in death, passing in December 1980.  Their corporal remains were interred in the Southern Memorial Park cemetery at Biloxi.(The Daily Herald, June 5, 1980, p. A2 and December 30. 1980, p. A2)    

 

Paul DeFrank Jr.

Mr. Elliott retired from his jewelry business in 1961 and Paul DeFrank Jr. (1918-2006), his son-in-law, became the proprietor of Elliott’s Jewelry.  Paul DeFrank Jr. was born at Bessemer, Alabama to Paolini DiFranco (1886-1958) and Elsie Lynn DiFranco (1896-1960+).  Mr. DiFranco had immigrated to America from Sutera, Caltanisetta, Sicily in February 1909 aboard the SS Campania and by 1920, he had changed Paolini DiFranco, his birth name, to Paul DeFrank.  He made his livelihood as a shoe maker and shoe repairman in Alabama while providing for his six children.(1930 Jefferson Co., Alabama Federal Census R21, p. 26A, ED 112)

 

In September 1952, Paul DeFrank Jr. and the Elliotts took a five year lease from Joseph V. Lawrence at (1902-1975) at 200 Howard Avenue in the Lawrence Building.  They remained here until Skip DeFrank, successor to his grandfather and father’s jewelry enterprise, moved to Pass Road in West Biloxi in the early 1990s.  Elliott’s Jewelry is now closed.

 

Paul DeFrank Jr. married Virginia Elliott in 1936.  They had met in Montgomery, Alabama at a Freshman party on the campus of Huntington College.  They were the parents of Paul DeFrank II, called ‘Skip’, and Virginia Paulette ‘Toni’ DeFrank (b. 1938).  She married Charles H. Schaffner (b. 1936), the son of Philippe ‘Phil’ Val Louis Schaffner (1908-1936), and Ethelyn Lucille MacKenzie (b. 1916).  Mrs. Schaffner married Donald L. ‘Pat’ Connor (1912-1982) after the demise of her husband.(History of Jackson Co., Mississippi, 1989, pp. 169-172)

 

Mutual Homestead Association-1922

Edward Brady was a founder of the Mutual Homestead Association.  With J.W. Apperson, Edgar Beale (1882-1950), Louis Braun, John G. Cohoe (1847-1943), Ulysses Desporte, and Davis G. Skinner, he incorporated this Biloxi building and loan association in June 1922.(The Daily Herald, January 25, 1922, p. 5)

 

Philanthropist

Edward L. Brady and spouse were generous to the less fortunate of Biloxi.  Several examples of their philanthropy to the Biloxi Charity Hospital follow: As Dr. Hyman M. Folkes was his brother-in-law, Edward L. Brady was involved with the Biloxi Charity Hospital.  In April 1909, he donated a gold watch to be given in a raffle to support the local hospital’s building fund.  Mrs. George F. Adams of NOLA won the time, which netted the Charity Hospital fifty dollars.(The Daily Herald, April 21, 1909, p. 4)

In February 1913, Reverend D.A. Planck of Mobile delivered a public lecture in Biloxi on ‘King Solomon’s Temple.  Tickets to the event were priced at twenty-five cents.  Mr. Brady donated a gold pendant to the young lady who sold the most tickets to the lecture.(The Daily Herald, February 13, 1913, p.8)

 

Sportsman and traveler

Edward L. Brady was known in Biloxi as an outdoorsman.  He enjoyed golf, hunting, trap shooting, fishing, sailing and motor boating.  Mrs. Brady also participated in many of these same activities.  A collage of their sporting life at Biloxi follows: 

 

Biloxi Yacht Club

Edward L. Brady was elected Commodore of the Biloxi Yacht Club (BYC) for consecutive terms in 1910 and 1911.  For the yacht club’s Eleventh Annual Regatta held in July 1910, he donated the ‘Brady Cup’, a silver cup.  The Brady donation trophy was to be awarded to the speed boat with the fastest actual time over the fourteen mile racecourse.(The Daily Herald, July 9, 1910, p. 4 and July 12, 1910, p. 3)

 

The BYC was founded in the Montross Hotel on May 2, 1901.  John Caraway was elected president; John J. Kennedy, vice-president; T.P. Dulion, Commodore; George H. Dunbar, vice Commodore; Dr. D.A. Nash, rear commodore; Byrd Enochs, treasurer; and H.F. Sawford, secretary.  Theodore Brune (1854-1932), NOLA architect, presented plans for the new, 3000 sq.-ft. yacht club to be built in front of the Montross Hotel on Front Street, now Beach Boulevard, and Lameuse Street.(The Biloxi Daily Herald, May 4, 1901, p. 1)

 

In May 1896, prior to the organization of the BYC, Tony and Zio Benachi, the Benachi Brothers; T.P. Dulion; John Eistetter; Thomas H. Gleason; Ed Glennan; Louis Gill; Martin Green; John Johnson; Nicholas Voivedich et al proposed to found a yacht club in Biloxi.  Again in May 1900, the West End Yacht Club was proposed at Biloxi by T.L. McGowan, the Benachi Brothers, and M.W. Murphy.  Neither ventures resulted in a permanent yacht club for Biloxi.(The Biloxi Daily Herald, May 9, 1896, p. 8 and May 7, 1900, p. 8)

 

When Governor Andrew H. Longino (1854-1942) signed its charter on August 7, 1901, the BYC was made official with the following local  gentlemen’s name on the charter: A.O. Bourdon Jr.; W.K.M. Dukate; H.F. Sawford; Laz Lopez Sr.; John Carraway; H.R. Bohn; T.P. Dulion; John J. Kennedy; G.W. Wilkes; W.T. Griffin; and Byrd Enochs.(Harrison County, Miss. Chattel Deed Bk. 6, p. 369 and 2nd JD Charter of Incorporation Bk. 1, p. 647, The Biloxi Daily Herald, July 13, 1901, p. 10 and August 9, 1901, p. 8)

 

The BYC approved its charter and by-laws and had commenced building the clubhouse by mid-June 1901.  The structure was completed in early August 1901.  It was one of six buildings situated between Magnolia and Main Streets on the beach front to survive the August 15th Hurricane.  The fish and oyster houses in this sector were destroyed as well as many piers, including that of the BYC.(The Biloxi Daily Herald, June 20, 1901, p. 8. August 11, 1901, p. 1, and August 16, 1901, p. 1)

 During his 1910 tenure as BYC Commodore, Edward L. Brady served with the following members: Louis Gorenflo, vice commodore; Oscar Johnson, rear commodore; H.A. Janin, rear commodore; Ulysse Desporte, fleet captain; Dr. W.T. Bolton, fleet surgeon; G.J. Wiltz, sec.-treas.; and Ernest Desporte Sr., measurer.(The Daily Herald, June 3, 1910, p. 8)

In 1911, Commodore Brady’s BYC elected officers were: Dan Gorenflo, vice commodore; Henry Janin Jr., rear commodore; W.E. Kennedy, fleet captain; Dr. Frank Carroll, fleet surgeon; G.J. Wiltz, sec.-treas.; and Ernest Desporte Sr., official measurer.  Other active committee members were: Ernest Desporte Jr.; Byrd Enochs; Dr. Charles Brown; Dr. G.F. Carroll; Albert Gorenflo; and George Rhodes.(The Daily Herald, June 3, 1911, p. 1)

 

Boat Racing

Edward L. Brady and spouse were avid speedboat enthusiasts.  Among their competitive motorboats were: Ditto, Lady Fish,and Santa C.  In late July 1910, their Santa C  and Martin Fountain’s Horse Fly  dueled in a match race on Back Bay.  Witnessed by many spectators on land and sea, the Horse Fly  won by two minutes over the seven mile course which commenced at Joullian’s Wharf on Back Bay and ran to the Back Bay Bridge and then east to the L&N Railroad Bridge near Ocean Springs.  Mr. Fountain had built both boats, which were powered by the six horsepower Gray motor.(The Daily Herald, August 1, 1910, p. 1)      

 

Edward L. Brady won the cabin cruiser class at the July 1912 annual Biloxi Regatta.  He defeated Tokay, the racer of R.C. McClure of the Crescent City.  Mr. McClure complained after his defeat that the Ditto was not a cabin cruiser, but an open launch and therefore had been misclassified.(The Daily Herald, July 12, 1912, p. 1 and July 16, 1912, p. 8)    

 

At several of Biloxi’s Annual Regatta held in early July, Erena Lopez Brady who owned and raced her Lady Fish, an open launch, motor vessel, won the 20-30 horsepower class.  The Lady Fish was described as ‘one of Biloxi’s most popular boats and never defeated in her class”. (The Daily Herald, July 18, 1913, p. 1 and July 17, 1914, p. 1)      

 

In July 1915, Mrs. Brady was victorious in Ditto at the Biloxi Regatta.  She raced in the cabin launch class.(The July 9, 1915, p. 1)

 

By 1921, the engine of Lady Fish had been installed in the Easy, owned and raced by Ojo Ohr.  Mr. Ohr won in his racing class at the 1921 annual Biloxi Regatta utilizing the former Brady engine.(The Daily Herald, May 18, 1921, p. 4 and July 8, 1921, p. 1)                 

 

Biloxi Golf Club

When the Biloxi Golf Club was incorporated in March 1918, Edward L. Brady, Elbert L. Dukate, and John J. Kennedy were the incorporators.  Mr. Brady was elected president of the Biloxi Golf Club in April 1932 with Fred Ferson, vice-president; Eugene Peresich, treasurer; and Irwin B. Cowie (1879-1949), secretary.(The Daily Herald, March 26, 1918, p. 2 and April 11, 1932, p. 2)

 

Hunting

With the duck hunting season open in the fall of 1912, the Bradys boarded Ditto and headed southwest to the Louisiana marshes and Bayou Lemare to hunt.  Several days of hunting resulted in over one hundred ducks of varying species killed by the adventurous couple.  They made the return trip of eighty-five miles to Biloxi in six hours.  The kill was shared with friends and neighbors.(The Daily Herald, November 16, 1912, p. 8)

 

1913 Panama Canal

In March 1913, Edward and Erena Lopez Brady left Biloxi for a holiday to Central America and the Caribbean.  They went as far as Panama to visit and observe the construction of the Panama Canal.  While there, the Bradys met George W. Goethals (1858-1928), US Army officer and civil engineer, who constructed and opened the canal in August 1914.  In addition, they were introduced to Dr. William C. Gorgas (1854-1920), an Alabaman, who introduced sanitary measures into the Canal Zone by draining swampsand ponds, fumigating for mosquitoes and other vermin, providing mosquito netting, and building the public water system.  Other venues on the Brady’s southern tour included Costa Rica, Jamaica, and Cuba.  At Havana, they met Julia D. Lopez and Miss Josephine Folkes, respectively the mother and niece of Mrs. Brady.  Together they sailed to Key West, Florida and also visited St. Augustine and Jacksonville before returning to Biloxi in late April 1913.(The Daily Herald, April 29, 1913, p. 1)

 

Erena’s Beach property and residence

 Before her betrothal to Edward L. Brady, Erena A. Lopez began acquiring valuable tracts of land east and west of the Biloxi Cemetery south of the L&N Railroad right-of-way.  In April 1905 for $1200 she purchased a 2.48 acre lot from T.J. Rosell and T.P. Dulion, her uncle, which ran south of the L&N for five hundred seventy-eight feet and was bounded on the east by the Biloxi Cemetery, south by Noblin, and west by A.E. Carter.  Two months later, Erena in June 1905 for $17,000, bought from Catherine Elizabeth Burke Perry (1861-1928), a native of New Orleans, 10.2 acres east of the Biloxi City Cemetery that had a front on the Gulf of Mexico of three hundred sixty-eight feet and ran north almost 1200 feet to Cemetery Road, now Irish Hill Drive.  Her sister, Teresa Lopez Folkes owned the property east of Mrs. Brady.(Harrison Co., Mississippi Land Deed Bk. 67, p. 309 and Bk. 69, p. 89)            

 

Sales on West Beach

In later years, Erena Lopez Brady and spouse resided at 1320 West Beach, on the large tract acquired from Mrs. Perry, the wife of Fred Perry (1860-1900+), a Biloxi dry good clerk.  From her West Beach parcel, Erena L. Brady sold a lot to Arnaud Lopez, her brother, in June 1911.  The Arnaud Lopez lot was due east of her tract and had a front of 165 feet on the Gulf and ran north to Cemetery Road, now Irish Hill Drive.  Mr. Lopez sold this tract to Nellie Gorman Lopez in June 1922.  A correction in the original warranty deed was recorded in July 1922. (Harrison Co., Mississippi Land Deed Bk. 134, p. 561, Bk. 134, p. 562, and Bk. 135, p. 325)           

 

Julia Avenue

In May 1909, the City of Biloxi led by Mayor T.J. Rosell (1861-1923) passed City Ordinance No. 421 which quitclaimed a strip of land forty feet wide [east to west] and one thousand one hundred and seventy-two feet long [north to south] to Erena Lopez Brady.  This strip of land ran north between West Beach Boulevard and Cemetery Street and known as Julia Avenue.  It had been dedicated for a street to be named for Julia Dulion Lopez, Mrs. Brady’s mother.(Harrison Co., Mississippi Land Deed Bk. 91, p. 316 and The Daily Herald, May 10, 1909, p. 4)

 

Biloxi Cemetery conveyance

In April 1938, the City of Biloxi for $3000 acquired about 3.1 acres off the north end of the Erena Lopez residence lot on West Beach.  This addition to the cemetery property ran south of Cemetery Road for about 630 feet and was about 215 feet wide-east to west.  The Biloxi Cemetery was to the west; Arnaud Lopez to the east; and the Gulf to the south.(Harrison Co., Mississippi Land Deed Bk. 220, p. 121)

 

AVELEZ HOTEL

 AVELEZ HOTEL

 [Image made before the August 1930 fire]

 

W.K.M. Dukate home

In late 1922, Edward L. Brady (1874-1939), Erena Lopez Brady (1885-1940) and Teresa Lopez Folkes (1873-1951) acquired the W.K.M. Dukate (1852-1916) residence property situated on the south side of West Howard Avenue bounded by Croesus Street on the west and Magnolia Street on the east. The magnificent Dukate home, which cost $4500 to erect, had been built here in the fall of 1894 with J.F. Barnes, architect and contractor from New Orleans, in charge. The Dukate lot on West Howard Avenue was leveled and prepared for construction in mid-October 1894. By mid-December 1894, the Dukate home was nearing completion. In March 1895, local decorators White & Suter were lauded for the quality of their paper hanging, painting and interior decorating of the Dukate edifice. Henry Lienhard, a relative of Mrs. Linda Dukate, painted the fence surrounding the perimeter of the Dukate place.(The Biloxi Herald,

 

Avelez Hotel

In December 1922, it was announded that the 1895 DuKate mansion was sold by Beale & Yerger to a sydicate [Brady-Folkes, descendants of Laz Lopez] that had it demolished in June-July 1923 to erect a modern hotel which would be called the Avelez Hotel. In late February 1923, they with Carl Matthes, a well-respected Biloxi architect, had left Biloxi to tour and inspect some of the finer resorts and hotels in Florida with the purpose of generating ideas for their new Biloxi enterprise.  A ground breaking was scheduled for mid-July 1923 and Tallavest & Rigar, builders from Jacksonville, Florida, were contracted by the syndicate to erect a five-story, one-hundred room edifice at the cost of $60,000. The hotel was to be the equipped with modern furniture and each hotel room to have a bathroom.(The Daily Herald, December 6, 1922, p. 3, December 28, 1923, p. 1, February 27, 1923, p. 3, and July 10, 1923, p. 3)

 

E.L. Brady Hotel Company

The Erena L. Brady Hotel Company was chartered in the State of Mississippi in September 1923 by Edward L. Brady, Erena Lopez Brady, and William Lee Guice.(Harrison Co., Mississippi Chattel Deed Bk. 28, p. 545 and Land Deed Bk. 403, p. 171)

 

Hotel lot

The Avelez Hotel lot facing north of West Howard Avenue was situated between Croesus Street and Magnolia Street and described as follows: From the point of beginning which is the intersection of the south side of West Howard Avenue and Magnolia Street; thence south 202 ½ feet to a point which is the southeast corner of the hotel lot; then go west for 80 feet; thence south 13 2/12 feet to a point and then go west 70 feet to the southwest corner of the hotel lot; go north along the east side of Croesus for 239 feet to the northwest corner of West Howard Avenue and Croesus Street; thence 163 feet along West Howard Avenue to the point of beginning.(Harrison Co., Mississippi Land Deed Bk. 235, p. 267)

 

The name Avelez was chosen for the Brady hotel. Lazarus Lopez (1850-1903), the father of Erena Lopez Brady, had been born at Aviles, Asturias Province, north western Spain in October 1850. He left Spain for Cuba in 1863 and arrived in Texas before becoming a denizen of Biloxi, Mississippi circa 1870.  Lazaro Lopez expired in Rome, Italy on September 25, 1903 as the result of an acute inflammation of his kidneys and dysentery. Earlier he and Julia Dulion Lopez (1857-1918), his loving spouse, with four of their youngest children, Julius M. Lopez (1886-1958), Erena Lopez, Rowena Lopez (1895-1986), and Noreta Lopez (1896-1960), had departed Biloxi, Mississippi via the L&N Railroad for NYC where they boarded an ocean liner for Europe.  Mr. Lopez had been ill at Biloxi before they left for Europe. A telegram from Rome reached Biloxi on September 19, 1903 notifying his family here that he was seriously sick.(The Biloxi Herald, September 19, 1903, p. 8)

 

Opening-New Year’s Eve-1923

When the Avelez Hotel opened on December 31, 1923, Philip Columbus Caldwell (1892-1951) was its manager. Manager Caldwell had married Rowena Lopez (1895-1986), the sister of Erena Lopez Brady, on January 12, 1917 in a small wedding ceremony at Nativity B.V.M. in Biloxi. Father Alphonse Ketels officiated for their nuptial vows. Mr. Caldwell was manager of was the manager of the Great Southern Hotel at Gulfport, Mississippi.(The Daily Herald, January 13, 1917, p. 3)

 

The newlywed Caldwells made their home in Gulfport. By the fall of 1917, Philip C. Caldwell had left his managerial position with the Great Southern Hotel and joined J. Rucks Yerger Jr. (1892-1931), his brother-in-law, in the insurance business as Yerger-Caldwell. Their office was above Grant’s Drug Store on West Howard Avenue. With WWI raging in Europe, Mr. Caldwell joined the U.S. Army in 1917 and was stationed at Camp Shelby in the Quartermasters Corps.(The Daily Herald, October 4, 1917, p. 3 and October 8, 1917, p. 3)

 

By 1920, the Caldwell family was domiciled in the Lazarus Lopez edifice on West Howard Avenue living with the Yergers, Noreta Julia Lopez Yerger (1896-1960) and Rucks Yerger, and the Bradys, Erena L. Brady and Edward L. Brady. In January 1920, the Yergers made the decision to demolish, the magnificent Lopez domicile and erect the Yerger Building on it site. By this time three Caldwell children, Margaret Caldwell (1918) m. ; Philip J. ‘Jack’ Caldwell II (1919-2008) m. Joan H. Caldwell (1923-2001); and Rowena ‘Jill’ Caldwell (1919-2008) m. Mr. Otremba.(The Daily Herald, January 22, 1920, p. 3 and June 10, 1920, p. 6)

 

Phillip C. Caldwell expired at Chicago in the Mercy Hospital on June 8, 1951. The Caldwell family had left Biloxi in 1924. At the time of his demise, Mr. Caldwell was manager of the Chapman-Park Hotel in Los Angeles. He was survived by Rowena Lopez Caldwell, his spouse, and children: Mrs. Edward Wilson of Chicago; Mrs. Arthur Atriembo; and Phillip Caldwell. Phillip Caldwell's corporal remains were interred at a Chicago cemetery. Rowen Lopez Caldwell passed on April 17, 1986 at Goleta, Santa Barbara County, California. (The Daily Herald, June 9, 1951, p. 3)

 

Rowen Lopez Caldwell passed on April 17, 1986 at Goleta, Santa Barbara County, California,

 

Phil Caldwell was instrumental in securing the Greeters of America to make a visit to Biloxi. Before they arrived, he had taken a position at the Hotel Galves at Galveston, Texas in May 1921.(The Daily Herald, May 12, 1921, p. 8)

 

In the summer of 1930, the Caldwell family was domiciled at Chicago. Phil and Rowena L. Caldwell took a two month European tour at this time. Their three children were enrolled in summer camps in Michigan. Jill and Margaret Caldwell went to Camp Meecasinio near Baldwin, Michigan while Jack attended Camp Algonquin near Alanson, Michigan.

 

1930 Conflagration

The Avelez Hotel structure was struck by a devastating conflagration in the early morning of August 24, 1930. The fire originated in the Hill Store in the arcade fronting the hotel section of the building. Guests of the Avelez Hotel were notified and evacuated from their rooms without harm. Initial damage estimates from insurance adjusters placed the total cost of the fire at about $65,000, which when itemized came to $40,000 to $50,000 for stocks and fixtures and about $25,000 for the structure. The hotel proper was harmed only by smoke and water. Mrs. Erena Brady Lopez announced that the fire damaged arcade would be rebuilt. The day after the fire, Collins Brothers and Manual and Wetzel, two local building contractors, were making estimates for Mrs. Brady and her insurance companies respectively. Businesses affected by the conflagration in addition to the Hill Store were: Eddie’s Drug Store-Eddie Ouille owner; La Nationale Beauty Parlor-Mrs. Charles H. Patterson of NOLA owner; The Biloxi Insurance Agency; the barber shop-N.H. McAllister, proprietor; and the Avelez Café operated by Dan Markotich.(The Daily Herald, August 25, 1930, p. 1).

Avelez management

W.D. Jarman of Baton Rouge, Louisiana former manager of the Avelez Hotel and the Pine Hills Hotel is now assistant manger with the Hotel Buena Vista.(The Daily Herald, June 6, 1927, p. 2)

 

1932-E.L. Brady Hotel Company default

The Great Depression commencing in October 1929 may have been the salient reason for the E.L. Brady Hotel Company to default on their mortgage of $166,000 made in March 1928 with the Canal Bank & Trust Company of NOLA. In October 1931, their chief bond holders, Allen Dezauche, Morris A. Hirsch, H.A. Cleaver, Richard McCarthy, and J.S. Waterman, who owned $133,500 in Avelez Hotel bonds, demanded payment. When the default came, the Avelez Hotel was sold to these gentlemen in a Trustee’s Sale on March 7, 1932.(Harrison Co., Mississippi Land Trust Deed Bk. 64, p. 169-163, Trust Deed Bk. 81, p. 230; and Harrison Co., Mississippi Land Deed Bk. 194, p. 58-70)

 

Avelez Hotel Company

Allen Dezauche and the bond holders of the Canal Bank & Trust Company sold the Avelez Hotel on April 1932 to the Avelez Hotel Company for $20,000.(Harrison Co., Mississippi Land Deed Bk. 194, p. 71)

 

1937-Sales

In January 1937, Properties Incorporated through the Stephen L. Guice and Company, a Biloxi realty firm, vended the Avelez Hotel to John T. Powers of Alexandria, Louisiana and associate with Guaranty Bank & Trust Company of Alexandria, Louisiana, and A.W. Keen, a resident of Houston, Texas and hotel operator with properties in Atlanta and Houston. These gentlemen will personally operate the hotel.(The Times-Picayune, January 12, 1937, p. 4 and January 17, 1937, p. 63)

John T. Powers sold a 1/4 interest of his interest in the Avelez Hotel to Katherine Waggoner Powers (1887-1957), his spouse in January 1937. It appears that the Powers divorced before 1945. Katherine W. Powers died at Biloxi, Mississippi in September 1957 leaving her son, John W. Powers, and M.C. Waggoner, a brother, at Tylertown, Mississippi. Her corporal remains were interred in the Southern Memorial Park cemetery in West Billxi.(Harrison Co., Mississippi Land Deed Bk. 213, p. 379 and The Daily Herald, September 17, 1957, p. 2)

 

John T. Powers

John Thomas Powers (1887-1971) was a native of Baton Rouge, Louisiana. Before Mr. Powers came to the Mississippi Coast, he was associated with the Bentley Hotel at Alexandria, Louisiana. In March 1937 when Mr. Powers was the managing the Avelez Hotel at Biloxi, John W. Powers (1911-1970), his son and a resident of Lake Charles, Louisiana, came to visit his parents at the hotel. While here, John W. Powers decided to relocate to Biloxi and became the cottage manager at the Buena Vista Hotel. By 1949, the Powers family was operating the Biloxi Laundry & Dry Cleaning Company at 244 Porter Avenue.(The Daily Herald, March 30, 1937, p. 3 )

In February 1945, Eva Mae Powers (1899-1965), a native of Alexandria, Louisiana and the wife of John T. Powers, acquired from Julia Agnes O’Neill Mooney Glengariff, an older residence situated at 253 Beach Drive in Ocean Springs. Glengariff was the former summer retirement home and estate of Captain Francis O'Neill (1849-1936) of Chicago and Mrs. Mooney was his daughter. The house was located near the center of a 5.14 acre tract which ran northeasterly from the beach front almost 800 feet to the southwest corner of Cleveland and Martin Avenues. There was 286 feet of beach front. Francis O'Neill was a resident of 5448 Drexel Avenue at Chicago, Illinois. He and his family wintered at Ocean Springs, Mississippi from 1914 to his death on January 26, 1936. O'Neil was interred at the Mount Olivet Cemetery in Chicago and is known today for his .(Jackson Co., Mississippi Land Deed Bk. 88, pp. 471-473)

John Werner Powers died at Glengarriff on January 27, 1970. He was survived by his wife, Mabel Powers, and children John Thomas Powers of Seattle and Carol Leatherman of Pineville, Louisiana. In September 1971, John T. Powers followed his son in death. His first spouse, Eva Mae Powers, had expired in mid-February 1965. She was a native of Alexandria, Louisiana. John T. Powers left a wife, Helen Edwards. He was a Mason and Shriner and also a member of the US Coast Guard Auxiliary.(The Ocean Springs News, February 18, 1965, p. 1, The Daily Herald, January 28, 1970, p. 2 and September 19, 1971, p. A-2)

Glengarriff was sold to El Madrid, Inc. in March 1969, by Mrs. Beverly S. Haslitt, the daughter of Eva Mae Powers, and John T. Powers. The magnificent old house was torn down to build the El Madrid Apartments, which became the Ocean Pointe Apartments, which commenced operations in the spring of 1971. Katrina destroyed all structures on this property in August 2005.(Jackson Co., Mississippi Land Deed Bk. 359, p. 259)

 

1940-Sales

The year 1940 saw many changes in the ownership of the Avelez Hotel. John T. Powers and his partners were in debt to the Reconstruct Finance Corporation for $38,730. The Powers party was sued in the Chancery Court of Harrison County, Mississippi in March 1940.(Harrison Co., Mississippi Land Deed Bk. 232, p. 379 and Harrison Co/, Mississippi Cause No. 16897-March 1940)

In May 1940, the trustee for the mortgagers of the Avelez Hotel, which at this time had eight-eight rooms and had been operated for about three years by John T. Powers, sold the hostelry for $33,000 to the Canal Bank & Trust Company of NOLA. The only other bidder was J.C. Hunt, the proprietor of the Tivoli Hotel and Riviera Hotel, both Biloxi inns.(The Daily Herald, May 14, 1940, p. 1)

 

1940-Pringle group

In October 1940, H.G. Thompson, special agent for the Canal Bank & Trust Company [in liquidation] conveyed the Avelez Hotel to Victor B. Pringle, Carl E. Matthes, and Dewey R. Reagan. The sales price was $42,500. The new owners planned to open in November with a new management team and was considering to enact renovations and improvements to the hotel and front.(Harrison Co., Mississippi Land Deed Bk. 235, p. 267)

 

The sale of the Avelez Hotel to the Pringle group was approved by the Federal Court at Biloxi and the Orleans Parish Civil District Court at New Orleans. The court required that the liquidators of the Canal Bank & Trust Compnay sell the Biloxi hotel for $42,500. The payment terms were $10,000 cash and the balance of the price to be paid in six annual installments, five payments int he amount of $2500 each year and the final payment of $20,000 with 5% interest and secure by a vendor's lien and deed of trust on the property. In addition, if the mortgage was paid in full within six months, there would be a discount of $2500 or if cancelled within one year, there would be a $2000 discount to the purchasers.(The Daily Herald, October 29, 1940, p. 3)

 

1946 Sale

In July 1946, Victor B. Pringle, Margaret W. Pringle, Beulah Dukate Matthes. Carl E. Matthes, Vallie D. Landry and Juan G. Landry sold the Avelez Hotel to the Avelez Hotel Corporation. The consideration was $190,000 with $55,000 paid in cash and $135,000 in promissory notes.(Harrison Co., Mississippi Land Deed Bk. 289, p. 493)

 

Avelez Hotel Corporation

The Avelez Hotel Corporation was chartered June 1946 by Uriah S. Joachim (1888-1977), Richard R. Guice, Adrian Weill (1903-), and Albert Sydney Johnson Jr. (1900-1992), In December 1955, the Avelez Hotel Corporation acquired the Riviera Hotel, formerly the Montross Hotel, located on the northeast corner of Lameuse Street Beach Boulevard from Willemenhia ‘Billie’ S. Morse.(Harrison Co., Mississippi Chattel Deed Bk. 93, p. 162 and Land Deed Bk. 403, p. 171)

 

Earle Hotel

In December 1946, theEarle Hotel Company, a national chain which operated hostelries from Boston to Seattle, took a10-year lease from the Avelez Hotel Corporation. The total consideration was $400,000 for the building’s furnishings and ancillary equipment. The one-hundred room, Avelez Hotel was renamed the Earle Hotel and T.R. Brady, manager, was replaced by H.R. Davern on January 1, 1947. H.R. Pratt of the Earle Hotel organization negotiated the lease through Victor Clesi, a broker domiciled in the Crescent City.(The Daily Herald, December 17, 1946, p. 1 and December 18, 1946, p. 15)

 

Avelez Hotel management notes

 Notes

W.D. Jarman of Baton Rough, Louisiana former manager of the Avelez Hotel and the Pine Hills Hotel is now assistant maanger with the Hotel Buena Vista.(The Daily Herald, June 6, 1927, p. 2) 

 

In December, the Earle Hotel Company, a national chain, took a long term lease from the Avelez Hotel Corporation.  The Avelez Hotel will be renamed the Earle Hotel and T.R. Brady, manager, will be replaced by H.R. Davern on January 1st.(The Daily Herald, December 17, 1946, p. 1)

 

Urban Renewal-Avelez Hotel demolition

In December 1972, the Harris Wrecking Company was employed to demolish the Avelez Hotel on West Howard Avenue.  The job was expected to take 30 days and their remuneration was $25,000.(The Daily Herald, December 1, 1972)

 

1926 Western USA and Caribbean Adventure

In early August 1926, Erena L. Brady, Arnaud and Junior Lopez, her brothers, and Preston Edmonds, a friend, left Biloxi by motorcar for the American West. They planned to go to Denver, Colorado and then to Yellowstone National Park, Portland, Oregon and San Francisco. In the City by the Bay, they would meet Theresa Lopez Folkes and her daughters, Josephine and Anna Folkes. The Folkes clan had left Biloxi in mid-July by train. Erena planned to visit Los Angeles and take an ocean liner to Honolulu, Hawaii. When Mrs. Brady returned to California, she would join her sister and neices and sail through the Panama Canal, visit Havana, Cuba, and return to Biloxi via New Orleans. Arnaud and Junior Lopez with Preston Edmonds would drive the automobile from California to Mississippi via the southern route.(The Daily Herald, August 3, 1926, p. 2)

 

Beach property and residence

           

Separation-divorce

On September 10, 1928, Edward L. Brady filed for a divorce from Erena Lopez.  It was finalized in late November 1928.  Since there were no children from this union, Erena took her maiden name of Lopez.  She made her home at 1320 West Beach Boulevard while Edward L. Brady settled at 126 Cuevas Street.(Harrison Co., Mississippi Chancery Court No. 10697-September 1928)

 

Mr. Brady’s death

Edward L. Brady passed on July 21, 1939.  He was domiciled at 126 Cuevas at this time.  His corporal remains were interred at the Southern Memorial Park cemetery under the auspices of the Episcopal Church.  Mr. Brady was survived by: Sarah Brady (1866-1939+) and Elizabeth Brady (1871-1939+), his sisters and residents of Forrest City, Arkansas; two nieces; and three nephews, John T. Brady and Edward E. Brady of Jacksonville, Florida, and Howard P. Schatz (1919-2006) of Bishop, California.  He was active in the Masonic Lodge, Biloxi Elks Club, and the Mississippi Trapshooters’ Association.(The Daily Herald, July 24, 1939, p. 8)

 

Erena’s  death and will

Erena Anthony Lopez expired in her home at 1320 West Beach Boulevard at Biloxi, Mississippi on January 6, 1940.  Her will written on December 12, 1934 is quite unique as it is a holography composed on the back of an envelope.  The envelope was mailed from the law office of K. Hundley at Alexandria, Louisiana and addressed to Mr. S.C. Mize, Attorney at Law, Gulfport, Mississippi.  The postage was 3 cents and a Christmas stamp was attached in the middle of will.  Erena’s final will was recorded in Harrison Co., Mississippi Chancery Court Will Book 7, p. ? is as follows:  I, the undersigned Erena Anthony Lopez formerly Erena Lopez Brady being of sound mind and understanding do hereby make my last will and testament.  I bequeath and devise to my sister Noreta Lopez Yerger, for the benefit of herself and children, all property, real estate and personal of what ever nature that I own or have, with the exceptions of my two  guns which I have already given some years ago as follows:  One 16 gauge double barrel Leferers gun to Bob Yerger and the 16 gauge double barrel Parker to Rowena Yerger.  Birds eye maple bedroom furniture to Anna Folkes Kelley.

Signed this 12th day of December, 1934.

Erena Anthony Lopez.

 

REFERENCES:

The History of Jackson County, Mississippi, (Jackson County, Mississippi Genealogical Society: Pascagoula, Mississippi-1989).

Jerome Lepre, Catholic Church Records Diocese of Biloxi, Mississippi, Volume I, (Catholic Dioceses of Biloxi: Biloxi, Mississippi-1991).

 

Chancery Court

Harrison County, Mississippi Chancery Court Cause No. 10697, “Edward Brady v. Erena Brady”-September 1928.

Harrison County, Mississippi Chancery Court Cause No. 17005, “The Estate of Erena A. Lopez”, March 1940.

Harrison County, Mississippi Chancery Court Cause No. 16897, “Re Finance Corporation v. John T. Powers, et al”, March 1940.

Harrison County, Mississippi Chancery Court Cause No. 18727, “Ex Parte-Marjorie Lopez Yerger, Noreta Lopez Yerger, Rombert M. yerger, Richard K. Yerger, and Rowena Lopez Yerger, minors by J.M. Lopez, their uncle and next friend, Noreta Lopez Yerger, and James Rucks Yerger”, April 1942.

Harrison County, Mississippi Chancery Court Cause No. 19034, “Noreta Lopez Yerger v. State of Mississippi”, September 1942.

 

Journals

The Biloxi-D’Iberville Press, “Picture of the Past-Avelez Hotel—In the Late Twenties”, July 24, 1985.

The Biloxi-D’Iberville Press, “The History of the Biloxi area-Avelez Hotel”, March 23, 1994.

The Biloxi Herald, “Local Happenings”, October 20, 1894.

The Biloxi Herald, “Local Happenings”, November 10, 1894.

The Biloxi Herald, “Local Happenings”, December 15, 1894.

The Biloxi Herald, “Local Happenings”, March 9, 1895.

The Biloxi Daily Herald, “The Yacht Club”, May 4, 1901, p. 1.

The Biloxi Daily Herald, “City News”, June 20, 1901.

The Biloxi Daily Herald, “Charter of Incorporation of the Biloxi Yacht Club”, July 13, 1901.

The Biloxi Daily Herald, “City News”, August 9, 1901.

The Biloxi Daily Herald, “The Club House”, August 11, 1901.

The Biloxi Daily Herald, “A Great Hurricane”, August 16, 1901.

The Biloxi Daily Herald, “Brady-Lopez”, February 12, 1908.

The Biloxi-D’Iberville Press, “The History of the Biloxi Area-Avelez Hotel”, March 23, 1994.

The Daily Herald,“Gold watch netted $50.00”, April 21, 1909.

The Daily Herald, “Ordinance No. 421”, May 10, 1909.

The Daily Herald, “Biloxi Yacht Club elects officers”, June 3, 1910.

The Daily Herald, “Silver Cup for Knockabout Class”, July 9, 1910.

The Daily Herald, “Eleventh Annual Regatta”, July 12, 1910.

The Daily Herald,Horse Fly defeats Santa”, August 1, 1910.

The Daily Herald,“Advertisement”, November 21, 1910.

The Daily Herald, “Brady is re-elected Commodore of the Biloxi Yacht Club”, June 3, 1911.

The Daily Herald, “New building for Redding and Lawrence”, July 18, 1911.

The Daily Herald, “Work on new brick building”, August 24, 1911.

The Daily Herald, “Work begins on building”, August 29, 1911.

The Daily Herald, “Another building finished in Biloxi”, November 27, 1911.

The Daily Herald, Humpty Dumpty, Speed Marvel, is sensation of Biloxi motor races”, July 12, 1912.

The Daily Herald, “Yachting gossip about the city”, July 16, 1912.

The Daily Herald, “Back from a big hunt”, November 16, 1912.

The Daily Herald, “Biloxi News Items”, December 14, 1912.

The Daily Herald, “Charity Hospital Benefit tomorrow night”, February 13, 1913.

The Daily Herald, “Canal is wonder-work of Century declares Biloxian about Panama”, April 29, 1913.

The Daily Herald, “Biloxi Yacht Club’s 14th Regatta closed with motor races Thursday”, July 18, 1913.

The Daily Herald, “Cranky motors feature closing of Biloxi Regatta”, July 17, 1914.

The Daily Herald, “Improvements at Brady’s”, May 10, 1915.

The Daily Herald, “Regatta goes out in blaze of glory at Riviera dance”, July 9, 1915.

The Daily Herald, “New watchmaker at Brady’s”, November 18, 1915.

The Daily Herald, “Prominent business man [Fred Bleur] locates in Biloxi”, May 17, 1917.

The Daily Herald, “Local News Paragraphs of Interest”, June 14, 1917.

The Daily Herald, “Charter of Incorporation of the Biloxi Golf Club”, March 26, 1918.

The Daily Herald, “J.E. Elliott going to Pascagoula”, June 4, 1918.

The Daily Herald, “Mr. Elliott comes back”, July 11, 1918.  .

The Daily Herald, “New visitor at J.E. Elliott home”, November 25, 1918.

The Daily Herald,“Lopez home to be demolished”, January 22, 1920. 

The Daily Herald,“Biloxi home is being torn down”, June 10, 1920.

The Daily Herald, “Speedboats given tryouts”, May 18, 1921.

The Daily Herald, “Racing season closes with splendid dances-prizes are awarded”, July 8, 1921.

The Daily Herald, “The Charter of Incorporation of the Mutual Homestead Association”, January 25, 1922.

The Daily Herald, “Dukate Home sold”, December 6, 1922.

The Daily Herald, “Making tour of Florida”, February 27, 1923.

The Daily Herald, “Handsome hotel to open New Year’s Eve”, December 28, 1923.

The Daily Herald, “Hundreds attend opening reception of Hotel Avelez”, January 1, 1924.

The Daily Herald, “Hundreds attend opening reception of Hotel Avelez”, January 1, 1924        .

The Daily Herald, “To tour West”, August 3, 1926.

The Daily Herald, “Jarman with Buena Vista”, June 6, 1927.

The Daily Herald, , “Start Redding-Lawrence Building”, June 27, 1927.

The Daily Herald, “Renovating Lawrence Building”, May 28, 1929.

The Dily Herald, “To rebuild Avalez building after $60,000 conflagration”, August 25, 1930.

The Daily Herald, “Opening new store”, February 22, 1932.

The Daily Herald, “E.L. Brady elected golf club president”, April 11, 1932.

The Daily Herald, “Brady funeral will be this afternoon”, July 24, 1939.

The Daily Herald, “Mrs. Erena Lopez dies at Biloxi home”, January 6, 1940.

The Daily Herald, “New Orleans bank buys Avelez Hotel”, May 14, 1940.

The Daily Herald, “Local syndicate buys Avelez Hotel”, October 14, 1940.

The Daily Herald, “Court authorizes sale Avelez Hotel”, October 29, 1940.

The Daily Herald, “Lease by Earle Hotel chain”, December 17, 1946.

The Daily Herald, “Biloxi, Avelez leased by chain”, December 18, 1946.

The Daily Herald, “Phillip Caldwell dies in Chicago”, June 9, 1951.

The Daily Herald, “Mrs. Katherine Powers”, September 17, 1957.

The Daily Herald, “John W. Powers", January 28, 1970, p. 2.

The Daily Herald, “John T. Powers", September 19, 1971, p. A-2.

The Daily Herald, “James E. Elliott Sr.”, June 5, 1980.

The Daily Herald, “Lucille Lundy Elliott”, December 30, 1980.

The Ocean Springs News, “Mrs. Eva Mae Powers”, February 18, 1965.

The Sun Herald, “DeFranks are jewels of Coast”, December 14, 1997.

The Sun Herald, “Mr. Paul DeFrank, Jr.”, February 15, 2006.

The Times-Picayune, “Sale of Avelez Hotel at Biloxi announced here”, January 12, 1937.

The Times-Picayune, “Biloxi, Avelez leased by chain”, December 18, 1946.

 

_________________________________________________________________________________________________

JULIUS M. LOPEZ

 

JULIUS M. LOPEZ

Julius M. Lopez (1886-1958) was born at Biloxi, Mississippi on September 10, 1886.   He was reared at Biloxi and attended St. Stanislaus College at Bay St. Louis, Mississippi.  In December 1907, Julius married Belle Markey (1887-1946), a native of New Orleans, in the Nativity B.V.M. Catholic Church at Biloxi.  Miss Markey was the daughter of Daniel Joseph Markey (1855-1900) and  Frederica Shirm (1863-1900).  Mr. Markey was an embalmer and managed the Coast Livery and Undertaking Company at Biloxi.(The Biloxi Daily Herald, December 12, 1907, p. 2 and Orleans Parish, Louisiana Federal Census T623 571, P. 1A, 3rd Ward)

 

Julius and Belle M. Lopez were the parents of two children: Julius ‘Jay’ M. Lopez II (1908-1990) m. Anne Davis (1916-1991) and Kathryn Lopez (1911-1984) m. Charles Dennery Wambsgans (1911-1990). 

 

Seafood magnate

At Biloxi, J.M. Lopez was active in the seafood industry and was an avid sailor and yachtsman.  Laz Lopez Sr., his father, was an entrepreneur and a pioneer seafood canner at Biloxi.  The first Biloxi seafood operation was located at the head of Reynoir Street on Back Bay.  In March 1883, it became the Biloxi Canning Company, but was originally called The Lopez, Elmer and Company.  The Lopez, Elmer and Company was organized in 1881, with a capital stock of $8,000 by Lazaro Lopez (1850-1903), F. William Elmer (1847-1926), W.K.M. Dukate (1853-1916), William Gorenflo (1844-1932), and James Maycock (1826-1892).

 

The Pascagoula Democrat-Star reported on December 30, 1881, that the company was placing its canning machines in the factory.  The proprietors had over one hundred, local, white men, and boys on the payroll.  They were employed as follows: forty-four openers, forty-five men manning fifteen boats, twenty or more canners and wharf men.(The Pascagoula Democrat-Star, December 30, 1881, p. 3)

Julius and Lazaro Joseph Lopez (1877-1918), his brother, pursued their livelihoods in the canning industry with Lopez, Dunbar’s Son & Company; Lopez & Dukate; Dunbars, and Lopez & Dukate; et al.   

 

Lopez- Greiner Packing Company

In May 1909, the Lopez-Greiner Packing Company was chartered in Mississippi by Julius M. Lopez and Charles F. Greiner.    

 

Yachtsman and boat racer

Circa 1907, Julius M. Lopez contracted with the Pope Boat Company of Fond du Lac, Wisconsin to build a motor yacht.  The vessel called Colin was launched in June1908 and reached Biloxi in July 1908.  Mr. Lopez brought his new craft down the Mississippi River accompanied by Edward Brady (1867-1939) and Erena Lopez Brady (1883-1940), his brother-in-law and sister, and Walter Hunt (1887-1961).  Colin was almost forty feet in length with a 7 ½ foot beam, and drew a little over two feet of water.  It could travel 25 mph driven by its 50 HP Davis engine.  Colin made her local debut at the 9th Annual Biloxi Regatta held on July 22, 1908.(The Biloxi Daily Herald, July 6, 1908, p. 1 and July 23, 1908, p. 1)

J.M. Lopez was a life member of the BYC and served as commodore in 1914-1915 and rear commodore in 1919-1920.  He was an avid supporter of motor boat racing on the Mexican Gulf.  (The Daily Herald, December 27, 1919, p. 2 and June 27, 1921, p. 3) 

    

Motorboat racing

The Belle M. of J.M. Lopez

 

At Biloxi in July 1909, Julius M. Lopez introduced the Waterspout, the first of his racing speed boats, to vie in Gulf Coast competition.  This swift, thirty-foot craft was built by Jack Covacevich and was powered by a 65 HP gasoline engine.  Its first race was against Blue Wing, the twenty-five foot and 29 HP, speed boat of Ernest L. Jahncke (1877-1933+) of New Orleans.  Waterspout was much quicker than Blue Wing, but did not finish the contest as her pump outlet failed and she began taking on water.(The Daily Herald, July 23, 1909, p. 1)

By the July 1911 Biloxi Regatta, J.M. Lopez had changed the name of the Waterspout theVirgin.  She was pitted against the Jub Jub andKitesy, both Lousiana based boats.  Kitesy was declared winner by default as her competitors dropped out due to mechanical issues.(The Daily Herald, July 10, 1911, p. 1)

Also in July 1911, Julius M. Lopez introduced a new watercraft to the GCYA motor boat racing circuit when he launched a thirty-foot, motor boat powered with a 40 HP engine.  This hydroplane style speedster was built by Jack Covacevich and christened Belle L, honoring Belle Markey Lopez, the spouse of J.M. Lopez.  The Belle L would soon become known as one of the fastest racers in the entire southeast.(The Daily Herald, July 14, 1911, p. 1)

At the July 1912, Biloxi Regatta, Belle L was opposed by the Humpty-Dumpty, a mahogany, one-step hydroplane owned by Ernest Lee Jahncke of the Crescent City.  Jack Covacevich and Leo E. Ohr aboard the Belle L won the contest by two minutes over the ten mile race course.  Captain Jahncke planned to have a large engine installed in his hydroplane to be more competitive against the Belle L.(The Daily Herald, July 12, 1912, p. 1 and July 20, 1912, p. 1)

On July 13, 1913, the Belle L made an exhibition appearance at the Pass Christian Regatta and was awarded a silver cup.  After winning the power boat championship at the 14th Annual Biloxi Regatta on July 18, 1913 and proclaimed ,’the fastest power boat in the South’, the Belle L sank in a gale in nine feet of water in Back Bay.  She was raised and her engine was dismantled, cleaned, and dried before reinstalling in the vessel.(The Daily Herald, July 14, 1913, p. 8 and July 21, 1913, p. 1)

 

Skeet Shooter

Julius M. Lopez went to Chicago in August 1923 to compete in the Grand American Handicap.  He was joined by other members of the Biloxi Gun Club: Edward Brady (1874-1939), Dr. George F. Carroll, and John D. Minor (1876-1937).  Mr. Lopez shot his way to the Grand American prize for Class C by    .(The Daily Herald, August 24, 1923, p. 1 and August 25, 1923, p. 3)

 

Leo E. Ohr

Julius M. Lopez often had Leo E. Ohr as the engineer or pilot of the Belle L.  Leo Edgar Ohr (1890-1970) was one of the four surviving children of George Edward Ohr Jr. (1857-1918), the ‘Mad Potter of Biloxi’ and Josephine Gehring (1868-1930), a native of Gretna, Louisiana.  On January 22, 1926, Leo married Mamie Catchot (1890-1961), a native of Ocean Springs, and the daughter of Antonio “Toy” Catchot (1868-1952) and Adelia Mon (1876-1948). (Lepre, 1991, p. 243 and HARCO, Ms. MRB 37, p. 522)

As early as 1913, Leo E. Ohr was in the automotive garage and machine business.  With Otto T. Ohr (1895-1982), his brother, he commenced The Ohr Boy’s Garage at 411 Delauney Street, now G.E. Ohr Boulevard, just north of their familial domicile and on the site of his father’s famous Pot-Ohr-E.(Biloxi City Directory, 1913-1914, p. 180) 

In April 1915, Leo E. Ohr obtained the Harley-Davidson franchise on the Mississippi Gulf Coast.  He rode the streets of Biloxi on his new twin cylinder Harley-Davidson as a demonstrator for interested customers.(The Daily Herald, April 26, 1915, p. 2)

By 1922, Leo had changed the name of his business to the Ohr Garage and by 1927, added “and Machine Works” to this title.  As late as 1949, he remained the proprietor of the Ohr Machine Shop.  In 1958, Leo E. Ohr was renting rooms at 208 Lameuse Street.(Biloxi City Directory, 1922-1923, p. 162, ibid. 1927, p. 158, ibid, 1949, p. 480, ibid. 1958, p. 641)

Some notices of Leo E. Ohr and his association with J.M. Lopez (1887-1958) follow: The Belle L is having her engines tested by Leo E. Ohr at his machine shop.  Mr. Lopez is preparing his swift craft for the summer racing season.(The Daily Herald, May 12, 1913, p. 8)

At the Biloxi Regatta in early July 1917, Leo E. Ohr and Fred Moran ran the Belle L for Mr. Lopez against Casey Jones of Gulfport.  They were victorious over the 18 mile race course and won the $50 prize.(The Daily Herald, July 6, 1917, p. 1)

In July 1919, Leo E. Ohr and Charles Webber piloted the Belle L to a win over Lady Fish in a 15 mile test in the waters off of Biloxi.  Julius M. Lopez announced after the victory that he planned to sell the Belle L.(The Daily Herald, July 11, 1919, p. 1)

 

Political ambitions

During the 1933-1935 administration of R. Hart Chinn, Mayor of Biloxi, Julius M. Lopez was appointed waterworks superintendent.  In the City elections of 1934, he ran for City Commissioner against Jacinto Baltar, who had been a candidate for Mayor in the special election of 1934.(The Daily Herald, June 16, 1934, p. 1)

In 1943, Julius M. Lopez ran for the Supervisor’s post for Harrison County Beat 1 against E. Dewey Lawrence, the strong incumbent.  He ran a good campaign but lost to Lawrence 2177 votes to 1175 votes.(The Daily Herald, August 2, 1943, p. 6)

 

Lopez lands

Julius M. Lopez began acquiring acreage in the Popp’s Ferry section of west Biloxi in April 1909, when he bought the old Elam R. Blackwell (1829-1896) homestead consisting approximately136 acres in Section 15/16, T7S-R10W.  It was vended to him for $2000 by Morris G. Blackwell.  Prior to 1851 and before the Blackwell occupation, which commenced here in1859, this tract had been the site of a large steam saw mill situated near the confluence of the Tchoutacabouffa and Biloxi Rivers.  This sawmill was identified as the “Chattagobouef” on the US Coast Survey Map of 1851 (1:10000) and in conveyance deeds the phrase “Old Mill Chimney” is used as a reference point to describe the boundaries of this large parcel of land.  It was one of more than twelve steam sawmills operating in the Biloxi Bay region at this time.  For many years, this property was referred to locally as ‘Mill Point’, ‘Blackwell Point’, and later ‘Lopez Point’.(Harrison Co., Mississippi Land Deed Bk. 90, p. 278 and The New Orleans Daily Crescent, June 19, 1849, p. 2)  

The Lopez Point parcel on the Tchoutacabouffa River was an outstanding location for a sawmill since it was near the terminus of these two large rivers and their tributaries as they discharged into the upper reaches of the Back Bay of Biloxi.  The Biloxi River was joined by Fritz Creek, Mill Creek, and the Little Biloxi River while the Tchoutacabouffa River supplied the fresh waters of Parker Creek, Howard Creek, Cypress Creek, Bayou Costapia, and Tuxachanie Creek to its drainage area.  The integrated watershed of these two rivers was approximately 640 square miles and consisted of almost 400,000 acres of longleaf pine, cypress and assorted hardwoods.  Trading schooners easily reached the “Chattagobouef” sawmill from the open Mexican Gulf waters.(Bellande, February 1994, p. 31)           

 

Tchoutacabouffa retreat

Here on the east bank of the Tchoutacabouffa River, Julius M. Lopez built a bungalow and established a holiday resort in the vicinity of the former sawmill and Blackwell homestead.  The Lopez bungalow was contracted to Harry Haise (1854-1954) in late May 1909 for $2500.  It was to have a 12-foot veranda around the structure.  The Lopez family entertained throughout the year with their guests enjoying the excellent fishing and hunting of the area.  It was not unusual for them to have out-of-state visitors here, especially from Illinois.(The Daily Herald, May 27, 1909, p. 4 and January 30, 1914, p. 2)

The Lopez property remained in the family until the 1960s when it was conveyed to A.J. McMurphy Sr. who developed the Ancient Oaks Subdivision northwest of the Sunkist Country Club.  In 1994, the author investigated the area now at 2556 Shore Drive and found old bricks and rusted iron both indicators of the remains of the Old Mill Chimney and sawmill machinery from the “Chattagobouef” mill of the early-mid 19th Century.

 

Lopez Point Subdivision

Some of the Lopez Point property remained in the family and in March 1986, Anne Davis Lopez, Charles D. Wambsgan (1911-1990), the spouse of Kathryn Lopez (1911-1984), et al platted the Lopez Point Subdivision northwest of the Sunkist Country Club.  In 1994, the author investigated Lot 6 and Lot 7 of this land subdivision along South Shore Drive and found old bricks and rusted iron both indicators of the remains of the Old Mill Chimney and sawmill machinery from the “Chattagobouef” mill of the early-mid 19th Century.(Harrison Co., Mississippi Chancery Court Land Plat Bk. 11, p. 14)

 

Sunkist Place burns

'Sunkkist Place’, the old John F. Popp estate on Big Lake was destroyed by fire in late May 1931 when in the possession of Julius M. Lopez.  It was once a show place of the Coast with its manicured grounds and regal setting on the high bluff overlooking the mouth of the Tchoutacabouffa River.(The Daily Herald, June 1, 1931)

 

Shortly after the destructive conflagration, Julius M. Lopez, obviously a casualty of the Great Depression lost “Sunkist Place’ to creditors in June 1931.  W.T. Moore, trustee, conveyed the property back to Marjorie Raggio and Mrs. Burton Walker, both residents of New Orleans.  They paid $5000 for the land.(Harrison Co., Mississippi Land Deed Bk. Bk. 190, p. 354)

 

Julius M. Lopez Jr.

 

Julius M. Lopez Jr. (1908-1990) was called Junior Lopez and Jay Lopez.  He was born at Biloxi, Mississippi and was a graduate of Biloxi High School. Jay received a bachelor of science and law degree at Loyola University where he was varsity quarterback for three years and also played baseball. He was a life member and former Commodore of the Biloxi Yacht Club and member of the Mississippi, Louisiana and Illinois Bar associations.

 

Mr. Lopez had joined the FBI in 1936 and was in charge of offices throughout the country before his retirement from the service in 1960. Jay was appointed in 1973 as the first director of Public Safety in Biloxi. Mr. Lopez died at Biloxi, Mississippi on Sunday, July 14, 1996, in Biloxi.  He was survived by a nephew, Denny Wambsgans, Prairieville, Louisiana; and three grand nephews, Paul, Chad and Eric Wambsgans, all of Prairieville. Jay was preceded in death by wife of 52 years, Anne Davis Lopez; and a sister, Kathryn Lopez Wambsgans (The Advocate, Baton Rouge, LA], July 16, 1996)

 

Jay Lopez (1908-1990) Interview

The Gorenflo Family: Relating William Gorenflo’s-death and bankruptcy in the 1930s.

by Julius M. ‘Jay’ Lopez II (1908-1990)

 

The William Gorenflo (1842-1932) that you see here [in the seafood business] was a contemporary of Laz Lopez in age.  Now Laz Lopez was my grandfather.  So you might say in a sense that parallels that Gorenflo could have been my grandfather.  Now he had a son named William F. Gorenflo (1887-1958).  Now William F. Gorenflo, therefore was a contemporary of my father [Julius M. Lopez (1886-1958) ].  They were both sons, you see.  Now, I knew that Gorenflo very well.  Because he, now he fooled with seafood a lot.  He also was an avid hunter and a trap shooter-shooting clay pigeons.  He also had the Gorenflo Hardware Company.  Do you know where that was?  No.  The Gorenflo Hardware Company, I guess the remnant building is still there.  It’s at the northeast corner of what was Howard Avenue and Delauney Street.  I think there was a credit agency there.  It’s right east of the old location of the jewelers [Elliott’s].  It was on the same side of Elliott’s and it was east of Elliott’s.  It was diagonally across from Eddie’s Drugstore.

 

That was William F. Gorenflo who was a contemporary of my father.  And that bankruptcy was probably his hardware store.  He died a short while after that.  Now he left two sons, no three sons: Louis Gorenflo was the oldest.  He was the one that created the boat, you know the tour boat [Jay is referring to the Sailfish.].  Steve Gorenflo (1907-1962) and Wilfred Gorenflo, now they were contemporaries of mine, you, now they are all dead.  Now, Wilfred’s widow is living.  She has that sporting goods shop right in back of Delchamps on Irish Hill Drive [Gorenflo’s Tackle].  She is the widow of Wilfred, who is the son of this William F. Gorenflo and the grandson of the [William] Gorenflo who went in with Lopez [Jay is referring to Lazaro Lopez (1850-1903), his grandfather].  His [Wilfred’s] widow is named Pat Gorenflo.  I don’t think she knows too much about something that went [on] way back then.  That’s the family tree as far as I know.  I don’t know if he [William Gorenflo] had any daughters or not.  He may have.

 

[William] Gorenflo died in the 1930s.  I remember him [Jay is confusing William Gorenflo with William F. Gorenflo, his son and the father of William, Louis, Steve, and Wilfred Gorenflo] when he was still living in that hardware store at that location with the three sons.  Whether he had any daughters, I don’t know.  Those were the Depression years and probably he went into bankruptcy.  It was either that or his seafood operation.  It had to be one of the two because I think that’s just about all he ever did was seafood and hardware.  There was another son, not that it makes any difference.  There was a William Gorenflo III (1903-1981).  So he had four sons.  In other words, William Gorenflo III would be a contemporary of Wilfred, Steve, and Louis.  He was the older of the boys.  Then came Louis, then came Steve.  Then came Wilfred.  Wilfred was the youngest.  I knew all of them.  I didn’t know William very well because he was a little older than I.

 

Questions about the Biloxi Canning Company and the Dunbar’s floating factory.

 

Lopez Place Subdivision

In February 1949, the Lopez Place subdivision was created in West Biloxi.  It was platted by J.M. Lopez Sr., J.M. Lopez Jr., Katherine Lopez Wambsgan, J.L. McKenzie, Dr. B.B. O’Mara, and W.P. Pieri.(Harrison Co., Mississippi 2nd JD District Plat Bk. 3, p. 19)  Third Street and Lopez Place streets.

 

Kathryn J. Lopez

Kathryn Jane Lopez (1911-1984) was born at Biloxi, Mississippi on February 3, 1911.  On June 15, 1918 she launched the Elizabeth Ruth, a 193-foot schooner built by the Mississippi Shipbuilding Corporation on Biloxi's Back Bay.  The vessel was designed by Zona W. Carter (1879-1953), a Biloxi resident.(The Daily Herald, June 15, 1918, p. 1)

 

In 1933, Kathryn Jane Lopez married Charles Dennery Wambsgans (1911-1996), the son of Jacob  Wambsgan (1868-1935), a baker, and May M. Adams (1879-1925). Charles D. Wambsgan, a native of New Orleans, arrived at Biloxi in January 1925 when his father acquired the L&N Bakery.  The family settled at 528 Seal Avenue where his mother expired on October 8, 1925.  Her corporal remains were sent to the Crescent City for internment in the Soniat Cemetery. 

 

Charles D. Wamsgans (1911-1996)

Charles D. Wamsgans finished his high school education at the Sacred Heart Academy in Mobile, Alabama and went on to attend Spring Hill College at Mobile for two years.  Returning to Biloxi, Charles worked for the L&N Bakery at Biloxi where he was the bookkeeper and stenographer.(The Daily Herald 50th Golden Jubilee issue, October 1934, p. 63)

 

Wambsgan family

The Jacob Wambsgan family of recent German ancestry originated at New Orleans.  In June 1895, Jacob Wambsgan relocated to Biloxi, Mississippi to take over the bakery business of E. Leon Redon.   He was partnered with a Mr. Beetz to operate the Premium Bakery situated on Pass Christian Street, now Howard Avenue, near Lameuse Street.  Jacob Wambsgan and Beetz produced bread hard tack, pies and cakes.  The other local bakeries advertised at this time were: The West End Bakery of Quint & Lamm on Pass Christian at Delauney and the Biloxi Bakery of W.P. Henley situated on Pass Christian Street and Main.  The Biloxi Bakery was taken over by W.R. Collins circa 1898.(The Biloxi Herald, June 1, 1895, p. 8 and April 18, 1896)

 

In Mississippi, two children were born to Jacob and Margaret Bender Wamsbgan (1874-1904) who had wedded in the Crescent City in October 1889: Alphonse H. Wambsgan (1894-1963) m. Bernadette Lamm (1904-1981) and Jacob Peter Wambsgan (1896-1930+).  Eva Wambsgan (1892-1935+) and Claire Wambsgan (1901-1935+), his daughters were born at New Orleans.  After the death of his wife in April 1904, Jacob Wambsgan married in New Orleans, May M. Adams (1879-1925), a talented and beautiful young lady.  The family lived on Belleville Street and later were domiciled on Magazine Street as Jacob continued to make his livelihood as a baker in the Crescent City to support his wife and five children.   Richard Wambsgan (1907-1935+); and Charles D. Wambsgan (1911-1996) were the children of May M. Adams.(The Biloxi Daily Herald, August 17, 1905, p. 2 and 1920 Orleans Parish, Louisiana Federal Census T626_623, p. 2B, ED 212)

 

Exchange Bank and L&N Bakery

When the Jacob Wambsgan’s family returned to Biloxi in 1925, they became associated with the L&N Bakery.  It had been started by Joseph W. Lamm (1874-1911) and Patrick H. Clark (1870-1927), his brother-in-law, at Biloxi in March 1898.  Mr. Lamm was a native of Longview, Texas and had arrived at Biloxi in 1894.  He initially was involved with the Bank Exchange Oyster Saloon, a restaurant and lounge, which was situated on the south side of Pass Christian Street near Lameuse.  Lamm had initially partnered with Junius Rue in this enterprise.  Mr. Rue sold his interest in the business to Henry Haller in January 1895.  Haller stayed with Lamm for a very short period vending his interest in the Bank Exchange to John Fayard in March 1895.(The Biloxi Herald, December 29, 1894, p. 3, January 19, 1895,p. 10, and March 16, 1895, p. 8)

 

By October 1895, Joseph W. Lamm was in the bakery business at Biloxi with Mr. Quint.  They operated as the West End Bakery and located The other local bakeries advertised at this time were: The West End Bakery of Quint and Lamm on Pass Christian at Delauney and the Biloxi Bakery of W.P. Henley also on Pass Christian Street and Main.  The Biloxi Bakery was taken over by W.R. Collins circa 1898.(

 

At New Orleans, in February 1900, he had married Katherine Clark (1874-1944), the daughter of Michael Clark and Anne Sheehan (1840-1919), Irish immigrants.  Prior to his commencement of the L&N Bakery, J.W. Lamm had been with the West End Bakery (1895-1896), and the Original Spanish Bakery (1896-1898).  In February 1903, Joseph W. Clark bought the Biloxi Bakery from the Estate of Mr. Pinsenchaum.  He planned to take over the business by mid-March.(The Biloxi Daily Herald, April 18, 1903, p. 8)

 

Lamm family

At New Orleans, in February 1900, Joseph W. Lamm married Katherine Clark (1874-1944), the daughter of Michael Clark and Anne Sheehan (1840-1919), Irish immigrants.  Joseph W. Lamm and Katherine Clark Lamm were the parents of five children: Hilda Lamm (1901-1906); Bernadette Lamm (1904-1981) m. Alphonse H. Wambsgan (1894-1963); James W. Lamm (1905-1941); twin girls (1906-1906); Margaret Lamm (1909-1930+); and Aquina Lamm (1911-1932+) m. Mr. Simmons.

 

Joseph W. Lamm expired at Biloxi on July 23, 1911.  He had a very active life in Biloxi having been a member of the following civic, fraternal and social organizations: Elks, Woodmen, Maccabees, Beavers, Biloxi Charitable Association, and Volunteer Fire Company No. 1.  Shortly after Mr. Lamm’s demise, the family notified the public that the L&N Bakery would continue with business in their usual manner.(The Daily Herald, July 24, 1911, p. 8 and July 25, 1911, p. 8)    

With the union of Bernadette Lamm and 

 

Kathryn Lopez expired on January 5, 1984.  Charles Dennery Wambsgan died March 2, 1996 at LaPlace, Louisiana.  Son, C. Dennery Wambsgan Jr. (1936-) m. Pauline ‘Polly’ Grimes (1940-)

 

REFERENCES:

Ray L. Bellande, Mississippi Gulf Coast History and Genealogy Society, ‘Toomer-McGuire Sawmill’, Volume 28, No. 1, February 1994.

The Daily Herald 50th Golden Jubilee Number Biographical and Historical 1884-1934, (The Daily Herald: Gulfport-Biloxi, Mississippi-1934).

Jerome Lepre, Catholic Church Records Diocese of Biloxi, Mississippi, Volume I, (Catholic Dioceses of Biloxi: Biloxi, Mississippi-1991).

 

Chancery Courts

Harrison County, Mississippi Chancery Court No. 15,019, “Mrs. Eurilda J. Seal Lopez v. J.M. Lopez, et al”, November 1936..

Harrison County, Mississippi Chancery Court No. 24,018, “The Estate of Julius M. Lopez”, .

Harrison County, Mississippi Chancery Court No. 24019, “The Estate of ?”.

Journals

The Biloxi Daily Herald, “City News”, February 27, 1903.

The Biloxi Daily Herald, “City News”, April 27, 1904.

The Biloxi Daily Herald, “City Paragraphs”, August 17, 1905.

The Biloxi Daily Herald, “Weddings-Lopez-Markey”, December 12, 1907.

The Biloxi Daily Herald, “”July 6, 1908.

The Biloxi Daily Herald, “”July 23, 1908.

The Daily Herald, “Contract for Bungalow”, May 27, 1909.

The Daily Herald, “”, July 10, 1911.

The Daily Herald, “”, July 14, 1911.

The Daily Herald, “Prominent baker of Biloxi is dead”, July 24, 1911.

The Daily Herald, “Notice to the Public”, July 25, 1911.

The Daily Herald, “Humpty-Dumpty, speed marvel is sensation of Biloxi motor races”, July 12, 1912.

The Daily Herald, Belle L simply walks away from much advertised Humpty-Dumpty”, July 20, 1912.

The Daily Herald, “Biloxi boats participate in the annual regatta of Pass yachtsmen”, July 14, 1913.

The Daily Herald, “Excursion boat is caught in heavy gale”, July 21, 1913.

The Daily Herald, “Elizabeth [Ruth] launched today with appropriate exercises”, June 15, 1918.

The Daily Herald, “”, December 27, 1919.

The Daily Herald, “Lopez shoot at Chicago”, August 24, 1923.

The Daily Herald, “Mrs. Jacob Wambsgan dies suddenly”, October 8, 1925.

The Daily Herald, “Baltar and Lopez enter Biloxi race”, June 16, 1934.

The Daily Herald, “Jacob Wambsgan died last night”, March 28, 1935.

The Daily Herald, “election results”, August 2, 1943.

The Daily Herald, “Biloxian heads FBI office at Indianapolis”, April 23, 1942.

The Daily Herald, “Julius Lopez Sr. taken by death; Rites on Friday”, January 9, 1958.

The Daily Herald, “Lopez returns to Biloxi after 23 years with FBI”, December 3, 1960.

The Daily Herald, “Lopez selected for FBI seminar”, April 20, 1974.

The Sun Herald, “Mrs. Kathryn Wambsgan”, January 6, 1984.

The Sun Herald, “Mrs. Anne Davis Lopez”, September 18, 1991.

The Sun Herald, “Julius M. ‘Jay’ Lopez Jr.”, July 16, 1996.

The Pascagoula Democrat-Star, December 30, 1881

________________________________________________________________________________________________

ROWENA LOPEZ

Rowena Lopez (1894-1986) was born at Biloxi, Mississippi on June 15, 1894.  On January 12, 1917, she married Phillip C. Caldwell (1892-1951) in a small wedding ceremony at Nativity B.V.M. in Biloxi.  Father Alphonse Ketels officiated for their nuptial vows.  Mr. Caldwell was manager of was the manager of the Great Southern Hotel at Gulfport, Mississippi.(The Daily Herald, January 13, 1917, p. 3)

Phillip C. Caldwell was an Illinois native and  son of Thomas H. Caldwell (1863-1910+) and Margaret J. Caldwell (1867-1900+), a Bay State native.  T.H. Caldwell was a Scotsman and had immigrated to Chicago in 1884, where he acquired knowledge of the meat packing industry.  By 1900, the Caldwells were domiciled at Meridian, Mississippi where Mr. Caldwell managed a meat packing house.(1900 Lauderdale Co., Mississippi Federal Census T623_815, p. 6A, ED 16)

The newlywed Caldwells made their home in Gulfport.  By the fall of 1917, Philip C. Caldwell had left his managerial position with the Great Southern Hotel and joined Rucks Yerger, his brother-in-law, in the insurance business as Yerger-Caldwell.  Their office was above Grant’s Drug Store on West Howard Avenue.  With WWI raging in Europe, Mr. Caldwell joined the U.S. Army in 1917 and was stationed at Camp Shelby in the Quartermasters Corps.(The Daily Herald, October 4, 1917, p. 3 and October 8, 1917, p. 3)

By 1920, the Caldwell family was domiciled in the Lopez edifice on West Howard Avenue living with the Yergers, Noreta L. Yerger and Rucks Yerger, and the Bradys, Erena L. Brady and Edward L. Brady.  In January 1920, the Yergers made the decision to demolish, the magnificent Lopez domicile and erect the Yerger Building on it site. By this time four children had been born and the families relocated to bungalows in the Lopez compound on West Beach at Biloxi.(The Daily Herald, January 22, 1920, p. 3 and June 10, 1920, p. 6)

 

Galveston

Phil Caldwell was instrumental in securing the Greeters of America to make a visit to Biloxi. Before they arrived, he had taken a position at the Hotel Galves at Galveston, Texas in May 1921.(The Daily Herald, May 12, 1921, p. 8)

 

Chicago

In the summer of 1930, the Caldwell family was domiciled at Chicago.  Phil and Rowena L. Caldwell took a two month European tour at this time.  Their three children were enrolled in summer camps in Michigan.  Jill and Margaret Caldwell went to Camp Meecasinio near Baldwin, Michigan while Jack attened Camp Algonquin near Alanson, Michigan.

 

CHILDREN

Margaret Caldwell (1918); Phillip Jackson ‘Jack’ Caldwell II (1919-2008) m. Joan       ; and Rowena ‘Jill’ Caldwell (1919-2008) m. Mr. Otremba.

 

1930

In January, Robert White bought the Caldwell property at West Howard Avenue and Reynoir Street including the W.V. Joyce Company store building, the five stores in the Caldwell Building, and the lot adjoining the two Howard Avenue properties with a frontage on Reynoir Street.(The Daily Herald, April 23, 1930, p. 12)  

In April, Robert White and Fred D.P. Snelling of Chicago have taken possession of the H.H. Roof property at 618 West Beach Boulevard.  W.E. Beasley of the Watson Agency made the $9000 sale.  Mr. Snelling is the owner of another West Beach Boulevard lot which he acquired several years ago.(The Daily Herald, April 23, 1930, p. 12) 

 

Demise

Phillip C. Caldwell expired at Chicago in the Mercy Hospital on June 8, 1951.  The Caldwell family had left Biloxi in 1921. At the time of his demise, Mr. Caldwell was manager of the Chapman-Park Hotel in Los Angeles.  He was survived by Rowena Lopez Caldwell, his spouse, and children: Mrs. Edward Wilson of Chicago; Mrs. Arthur Atriembo; and Phillip Caldwell.  Phillip Caldwell's corporal remains were interred at a Chicago cemetery.(The Daily Herald, June 9, 1951, p. 3)

 

Rowen Lopez Caldwell passed on April 17, 1986 at Goleta, Santa Barbara County, California,

 

REFERENCES:

Jerome Lepre, Catholic Church Records Diocese of Biloxi, Mississippi, Volume I, (Catholic Dioceses of Biloxi: Biloxi, Mississippi-1991).

The Daily Herald,“Caldwell-Lopez”, January 13, 1917.

The Daily Herald,“Mr. Caldwell goes to Camp Shelby”, October 4, 1917.

The Daily Herald,“Notice to the public”, October 8, 1917.

The Daily Herald,“Lopez home to be demolished”, January 22, 1920.  

The Daily Herald,“Biloxi home is being torn down”, June 10, 1920.

The Daily Herald,“Making home in Texas”, May 12, 1921.

The Daily Herald,“Biloxi Items”, April 23, 1930.

The Daily Herald,“Caldwells abroad”, July 31, 1930.

The Daily Herald,“Phillip Caldwell dies in Chicago”, June 9, 1951.

The Pasadena Star-News, “Philip Jackson Caldwell”, October 12, 2008.

_________________________________________________________________________________________________

 

NORETA JULIA LOPEZ

 Noreta Julia Lopez (1896-1960)

[courtesy of James Yerger Winklejohn-July 2011]

 

Noreta Julia Lopez (1896-1960) was born at Biloxi, Mississippi on July 31, 1896.  She married James Rucks Yerger II (1892-1931), called Rucks, who was born at Friars Point, Coahoma County, Mississippi on May 20, 1892 to James Rucks Yerger (1860-1931) and Hyacinth W.McGuin (1872-1930+).  Circa 1903, the Yerger family relocated to Gulfport, Mississippi where they were domiciled on 32nd Avenue.  At this time Mr. J. Rucks Yerger made his livelihood as a lawyer and Rucks was his stenographer.  Several years later the Yergers would become insurance agents.(T624_741, p. 7B, ED 40)

Rucks Yerger graduated from Gulfport High School where he played left tackle on the football squad.  In the Thanksgiving football game of 1908, Rucks Yerger broke his arm near the wrist.  The pain only compounded the humiliating 24 to 6 loss to archrival Biloxi.(The Biloxi Daily Herald, November 28, 1908, p. 9)

In October 1917, Rucks Yerger, Sr. announced that Chevally & Fursdon were going to erect a seven room bungalow for him on 2nd Street in Gulfport.  Dr.  was to be his neighbor.(The Daily Herald, October 1, 1917, p. )

 

 James Rucks Yerger II (1892-1931)

[courtesy of James Yerger Winklejohn-July 2011]

 

Marriage and livelihood

Noreta J. Lopez married J. Rucks Yerger II at Biloxi, Mississippi on January 25, 1917 in the Lopez home on West Howard Avenue.  Father Alphonse Ketels (1854-1921) of Nativity B.V.M. officiated at the ceremony.  The young couple honeymooned at the Lopez bungalow on the Tchoutacabouffa River and made their home with Mrs. Julia Lopez on West Howard Avenue.  Rucks Yerger planned to commute to his insurance agency at Gulfport. 

 

Mr. Yerger advertised his Gulfport insurance agency as follows:

LAW SUITS!                                   STOP THIEF!

You are sued for $5000.00                         Your car is stolen

       FIRE

Your car is destroyed by Fire

AUTOMOBILE OWNERS SUFFER THESE LOSES EVERY DAY

WE PROTECT YOU

Rates Reasonable---Companies Strong

INSURANCE

YERGER & PALMER

INSURANCE

HEWES BUILDING

                       Day Phone 301                                                                        Night Phones 498-415

 

By 1922, Rucks Yerger had entered the real estate and insurance business with Edgar Beale (1882-1950) in Biloxi, as Beale & Yerger, which was later acquired by the Biloxi Insurance Agency.(The Daily Herald, January, 26, 1917, p. 6 and January 29, 1931, p. 1 and Automobile Directory and Business Guide of Harrison Co., Ms., 1922, p. 16)

 

Beale & Yerger advertised their insurance business in 1922, as follows:

BEALE & YERGER

We issue every form of

AUTOMOBILE INSURANCE

In the oldest and largest companies

PROMPT AND SATISFACTORY ADJUSTMENTS

110 West Howard Avenue                 Biloxi, Mississippi

[ Automobile Directory and Business Guide of Harrison Co., Ms., 1922, p. 16 ]

 

 

Noreta's Inheritance

After the demise of her parents, Lazaro Lopez (1850-1903)and Julia Dulion Lopez (1857-1918), on September 25, 1903 and June 30, 1918 respectively, she was bequeathed stock and property from their estates.(Harrison Co., Mississippi Chancery Court Cause No. 1663-1918)

 

Lazaro's legacy

The Lopez residence, store building, and all other improvements situated on the lot of land described as: north by Chiapella; east by Mrs. Lafour (sic); south by Howard Avenue; and west by Reynoir Street was left to Julia Dulion Lopez and at her death or marriage to be the property of Noreta Lopez, his daughter.

To Erena, Rowena, and Noreta, my daughters, to share and share alike the following land in Biloxi: one lot fronting Chartres Street on the north; east by Coueve (sic) Street; south by the right-of-way of the L&N Railroad; and west by the land of the Caillavet heirs.

 

Julia’s Legacy

Julia Dulion Lopez died at Biloxi, Mississippi on June 30, 1918.  Before her demise, she had appointed Erena Lopez Brady, as executrix, of her estate without bonding.Harrison Co., Mississippi Chancery Court Cause No. 1663-1918)

 

Her bequests were to Noreta Lopez Yerger were as follows:

  1. To Noreta Lopez Yerger, my daughter, the property corner of Lameuse Street and Howard Avenue occupied by Kimbrough, Quint & Caillavet.
  2. To Noreta Lopez Yerger the Lopez home on West Howard Avenue and the Corner Store on Howard Avenue and Reynoir Street previously bequeathed to Norita Lopez Yerger by her father and whatever interest I have in these properties.
  3. To all of my daughters all of my stock in the L. Lopez & Company to be divided equally.
  4. To my seven children and Josephine Folkes all of my stock in the Interstate Bank & Trust Company of New Orleans to be divided equally.
  5. To my seven children all of my stock in the First National Bank of Biloxi excepting one share for Josephine Folkes, my granddaughter.
  6. To my seven children all of my stock in the Artesian Ice Company excepting one share for Josephine Folkes, my granddaughter.
  7. To my seven children all of my stock in the Gulfport & Mississippi Coast Traction Company to be divided equally.
  8.  

Lazaro Lopez Home Demolished

 

In January 1920, the Yerger family made the decision to demolish, the magnificent Lazaro Lopez domicile on West Howard Avenue and erect the Yerger Building on it site. By this time four children had been born and the families relocated to bungalows in the Lopez compound on West Beach at Biloxi.  The Laz Lopez family residence on West Howard Avenue was demolished by the Heath Construction Company in June 1920.  It had been inherited by Noreta Lopez Rucks, his daughter, after the death of her mother, Julia Dulion Lopez (1857-1918), in June 1918.  After the demolition was completed, the Yergers built a modern, one-story, brick building with a plate glass front on the former Lopez homestead.  The Yerger Building had four rental spaces which were initially occupied by a haberdashery, grocery store, plumber, and dry goods merchant.(The Daily Herald, January 22, 1920, p. 3 and June 10, 1920, p. 6)

 

Red Cross service

During WWI, Rucks Yerger worked with the American Red Cross to raise funds for their war effort.  His leadership and diligent toil resulted in a sparkling record of achievement in meeting quotas and often exceeding them.  This effort was rewarded in November 1922, as he was elected Chairman of the Red Cross chapter of Harrison County.  Shortly before her demise in September 1960, Noreta completed a Red Cross Grey Lady course.(The Daily Herald, November 2, 1922, p. 1 and September 14, 1960, p. 2)         

 

Strand Theatre

Noreta Lopez Yerger had inherited the large Lopez lot on the northeast corner of Howard Avenue and Reynoir Street. The Strand Theatre was built in Lopez Building on West Howard Avenue in the winter of 1923.  It opened in early January 1924 with a feature picture, comedy, and high class vaudeville act and orchestra.  The Strand Theatre was a modern theater with a seating capacity of six-hundred fifty.  The interior had a modern finish with lighting appropriate for projection and illumination of the building.  It also utilized a modern projector.(The Daily Herald, January 4, 1924, p. 1)

In January 1925, she made a five year lease with Julian H. Saenger (1873-1932) of the Gulf Coast Amusement Company to rent the building formerly housing the L. Lopez & Company store at 418 Howard Avenue as the Strand Theatre.  The rent was $250 per month.  On May 22, 1926, a fire on the adjacent property did some damage to the Strand Theatre and the movie house was shut down for repairs by Mrs. Yerger.  The lease was renegotiated after the fire and compromise was effected as the lessee agreed to a monthly rental rate of $325 each month until January 31, 1930, then it would be increased to $425 per month.(Harrison Co., Mississippi Land Deed Bk. 162, p. 232)

Anti-trust litigation filed in New Orleans against the Saenger Amusement Company and others was dismissed in early January.  Since the Saenger Amusement Company did not sell commodities, it was not in violation of the Louisiana State anti-trust statue.(The Daily Herald, January 10, 1924, p. 1)

Tom Bautovich (1908-1990), native of New Orleans and new organist at the Strand Theatre, is becoming popular with his audiences.  Tom is a graduate of the New Orleans conservatory of music and played in the top theaters in NOLA before coming to Biloxi.  He was a also daily broadcaster over WSMB in the Crescent City..(The Daily Herald, October 11, 1927, p. 2)

 

Saenger Theatre

 

 

 

Rucks dies

In January 1931, Rucks Yerger, Jr. was taken ill with pneumonia.  He expired in the Biloxi Hospital on January 28, 1931.  In addition to his family, Rucks was survived his parents at Gulfport, C.A. Rucks, a brother in Cincinnati, and Hyacinth Yerger McCormick of Dallas, Texas.(The Daily Herald, January 29, 1931, p. 1)

 

Yerger-Winkeljohn Family

[image made West Beach, Biloxi, Mississippi in late 1943-courtesy of James Yerger Winkeljohn-July 2011]

[L-R: Marjory Yerger Winkeljohn (1921-2002); Rowena Yerger Baltar (1930-2004); Noreta Lopez Yerger (1896-1960)  holding Julie Winkeljohn Collins (b. 1943); Robert Yerger (1927-1994) ; and Richard Yerger (1928-2005) 

 

Children

Noreta J. Lopez and Rucks Yerger were the parents of six children: James Rucks Yerger III (1917-1966); Marjory Lopez Yerger (1921-2002) m. Harold Walter Winkeljohn (1917-2014); Noreta Yerger (1925-2002) m. Hilton Lee Robinson (1921-1998); Robert Yerger (1927-1994); Richard Yerger (1928-2005) m. Nancy Scott (1936-2004); and Rowena Yerger (1930-2005) m. Jack Eikel Baltar.

 

James Rucks Yerger III

 

Marjory L. Yerger

Marjory Lopez Yerger (1921-2002) married Harold Walter Winkeljohn (1917-2014), a native of St. Henry, Ohio, in Nativity BVM Catholic Church at Biloxi, Harrison County, Mississippi on February 6, 1943.  Marjory was a May 1939 graduate of Biloxi High School where she was extremely popular.  Marjory had been selected Miss Biloxi High School and friendleist girl and was president of her Junior Class and secretary of her Senior Class.  In July 1939, Miss Yerger was Queen of the 3rd annual Biloxi Summer Sports Carnival.  Her first job was with the Desporte Insurance Agency.(Harrison County, Mississippi Circuit Court MRB 59, p. 131 and The Daily Herald, June 29, 1939, p. and p. 9)

 

Walter H. Winkeljohn

 

Walter H. Winkeljohn was born 1917 the youngest of the eleven children of Mathias H. Winkelkjohn (1864-1942), an 1879 German immigrant, and Rosina Marie Dabbelt (1872-1926).  His parents married in Ohio circa 1890 and had at least eleven children: Eleanora Christina Winklejohn Feldhake (1891-1984); Frances Winkeljohn (1893-1994); Anna Mary Winkeljohn Moeder (b. 1895-1975); Harry Winkeljohn (b. 1898); Maria J. Winkeljohn (1900-1993); Kathryn Winkeljohn (1903-1986); Helena D. Winkeljohn Everman (1905-1985); Leo Gerhard Winkeljohn (1907-1925); Clarence Winkeljohn; Edward C. Winkeljohn (1912-1995); and Walter H. Winkeljohn (1917-2014). 

 

Walter was a graduate of the University of Dayton where he excelled in basketball. He had been commissioned a 2nd Lieutenant in the US Army Air Corps and sent in the summer of 1941 to Biloxi, Mississippi with the initial vanguard of officers led by Colonel Arthur W. Brock Jr. to establish Keesler Field.  Lt. Winklejohn was in charge of the Army depot established on Gulfport's East Pier, which was receiving and storing barracks equipment such as, mattresses and bedding for the future military base.  The Biloxi Elks Club was very welcoming to the new officers entertaining them with a stag party at their Biloxi Lodge.(The Daily Herald, July 24, 1941, p. 1 and p. 5)

 

Walter was sent to Italy following D-Day.  After World War II ended, the young Winklejohn family settled in Fostoria, Ohio where Walter joined Edward C. Winklejohn, his brother, in the Ohio Auto Parts Company.  In 1959, when the family returned to the Mississippi Coast from Marion, Ohio where Walter was with the Ohio Automobile Supply Company, they acquired a home at 418 Martin Avenue in Ocean Springs and he commenced a business called Biloxi Auto Parts.(The Sun Herald, June 13, 2014, p. A-4)  

 

                                                                                                                                                                    1983

Winkeljohn- House

418 Martin Avenue

 

In August 1959, George E. Arndt Jr. (1909-1994) and Marie Arndt Alexander (1905-1994), his sister, conveyed their house and lot at 418 Martin Avenue to Walter H. Winkeljohn and Marjorie Y. Winkeljohn.(JXCO Land Deed Bk. 190, pp. 568-590)  

 

The Winkeljohn home was sold to Andrew J. Zielinski in 2014.  He met with the Ocean springs Preservation Commission on June 14, 2014 and presented evidence that restoration of the Katrina damaged structure was economically unfeasible and asked for permission to demolish the historic home.

 

Children

Marjory and Walter H. Winkeljohn were the parents of four children:  Julia Winkeljohn (b. 1944) m. Patrick M. Collins (1944-1993); James Yerger Winkeljohn (b. 1945) m. Jean Talmadge Kirkendall (b.1946); Stephen Winkeljohn m. Mary ?; and Kathryn Michele Winkeljohn m. Kenneth Laird.  Their progeny number ten children and twenty-eight grandchildren.(The Sun Herald, June 13, 2014, p. A-4)

 

Julia Winkeljohn

 

Kathryn Michele Winkeljohn

 

Kathryn Michele Winkeljohn married Paul Kenneth Laird in 1974.  Paul was a mechanical engineer at Eglin AFB, Fort Walton Beach, Florida.(The Ocean Springs Record, April 18, 1974, p. 6)

 

Jean Talmadge Kirkendall Winkeljohn

 
Jean Talmadge Kirkendall, the daughter of Brigadier General John Phillips Kirkendall and Doris Weisenbach, was born on May 18, 1946 at Macon, Georgia.  On June 13, 1971, she  married James Yerger Winkeljohn at St. Alphonsus Catholic Church in Ocean Springs, Mississippi.  Mr. Winkeljohn was born August 30, 1945.
 

Brigadier General John Phillips Kirkendall (1901-1980)

Brigadier General John Phillips Kirkendall (1901-1980)-was a native of Dallas, a small town, situated in the anthracite, coal belt of northeastern Pennsylvania.  After attending Seton Hall and Villanova, he entered West Point in July 1920 and graduated in June 1924 as a 2nd Lieutenant.  Kirkendall trained as a pilot in balloons, dirigibles, and fixed wing aircraft.  His military career took him to post in the USA, including Hawaii; Philippine Islands; England, Germany and Russia.  Colonel Kirkendall was promoted to Brigadier General in September 1952 while at Keesler Field AFB at Biloxi, Mississippi.  In August 1953, he retired from his long and active military career while at KAFB.  General Kirkendall expired in June 1980 while a resident of 1302 Bayou Drive.  His corporal remains were interred in the Biloxi National Cemetery.

John Phillips ‘Jack’ Kirkendall (1901-1980) was born February 16, 1901 at Dallas, Luzerne County, Pennsylvania the son of George Talmadge Kirkendall (1871-1945) and Helen Dennis Butler (1874-1922).  After graduating from high school at Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania in 1918, he attended Seton Hall in New Jersey for one year and Villanova College in Pennsylvania for a year. Entering the U.S. Military Academy at West Point, New York in July 1920, Cadet Sergeant Kirkendall graduated June 12, 1924, and was commissioned a 2nd Lieutenant in the Air Service.  While at West Point, Cadet Kirknedall was active as a Catholic Sunday school teacher and played varsity tennis.[The 1924 Howitzer

 

In the summer of 1924, 2nd Lieutenant Kirkendall traveled to Europe and North Africa.

 

Military Career

John P. Kirkendall commenced his military career in July 1920 as a cadet at the USMA at West Point, New York.  He was promoted to 2nd Lieutenant in June 1924 after completing his studies at West Point.  In September 1924, began Primary Flying School at Brooks Field, Texas, that September, he graduated the following March; attended Advanced Flying School at Kelly Field, Texas, for nine months; entered the Air Service Balloon and Airship School at Scott Field, Ill., and graduated in June 1926. After serving at Scott Field, Ill., he returned to Kelly Field in June 1928 to take the special observation course, which he completed that October.  Going to Hawaii in April 1929, General Kirkendall joined the Fourth Observation Squadron at Luke Field, and three months later was transferred to the 18th Pursuit Group at Schofield Barracks, Hawaii. Appointed finance officer at the Air Corps primary Flying School, Randolph Field, Texas, in July 1931, two months later he became adjutant of the Headquarters and Headquarters Squadron there. He went to Fort Sill, Oklahoma in March 1932, joining the First Balloon Squadron; was given temporary duty with the Civilian Conservation Corps camp at Stephenville, Texas, in July 1933; rejoining the First Balloon Squadron that December. He later assumed command of the 53rd School Squadron at Randolph Field.   Moving to the Philippine Islands in February 1938, General Kirkendall was assigned to the Fourth Composite Group at Nichols Field; became adjutant of Clark Field that July; and a year later was named operations officer there. Transferred to Wright Field, Ohio, in February 1940, he was assigned to the Air Materiel Division, contract section. That August he was assigned to the Office of the Undersecretary of War, where he served successively as assistant to the chief of the Air Corps section, Purchasing and Contract Branch, and assistant to the chief of the defense aid section there.  Ordered to Europe in June 1942, General Kirkendall was chief of the Procurement Branch of the Eighth Air Force Service Command, becoming its assistant chief of staff for supply that December. In June 1943 he was appointed assistant to the commanding general of the Supply Division, Air Service Command, at Patterson Field, Ohio. That August he joined the Special Planning Division of the War Department General Staff, and in October 1943 he was designated deputy commander of the Middletown Air Service Command at Olmsted Field, Pennsylvania.   General Kirkendall was assigned to the U.S. Military Mission to Moscow, Russia, in April 1945, and three months later was named chief of the Berlin, (Germany) Air Command. He assumed command of the 10th Air Depot Group in Germany the following January, and in May 1946 he was named commanding officer of the Ansbach (Germany) Air Depot.  Joining the Air Transport Command in February 1947, General Kirkendall was designated assistant chief of the staff for supply of the European Division at Wiesbaden, Germany, and that July assumed that position with the 51st Troop Carrier Wing there. The following January he was appointed chief of the Plans and Control Section of the U.S. Air Forces in Europe at Wiesbaden.

In April 1948 he became deputy commander of the Mobile Air Materiel Area at Brookley Field, Mobile, Alabama.  He was named executive officer of the 3380th Technical Training Wing there in October 1949.[http://www.af.mil/AboutUs/Biographies/Display/tabid/225/Article/106536/brigadier-general-john-phillips-kirkendall.aspx]


314 Jackson Avenue [pre and post Katrina]

In April 1954, Leslie P. Beard (1892-1966), a New Orleans attorney who in 1945 founded, the legal firm of Beard, Blue, & Schmitt, conveyed 314 Jackson Avenue to John P. Kirkendall.  The Beards then acquired a retirement home in Pass Christian and lived here until their deaths.  In January 1963, John P. Kurkendall conveyed his Ocean Springs home to Raymond J. Hudachek, a refinery engineer who designed the Standard Oil [Kentucky] , now Chevron, refinery at Pascagoula.(Jackson County, Mississippi Land Deed .(JXCO, Ms. Land Deed Bk. 138, pp. 418-420 and Bk. 234, p. 411)

 

Promotions

Lt. Kirkendall became a 1st Lieutenant in July 1929.  He was promoted to Captain in August 1935.  By December 1941, he had achieved the rank of Lt. Colonel.  J.P. Kirkendall made Colonel in March 1942 and Brigadier General in September 1952 while at Keesler AFB in Biloxi, Mississippi.(The Army Register, 1943, p. 494 and The Gulf Coast Times, September 11, 1952, p. 1)

 

Keesler Air Force Base

In the fall of 1949, General Kirkendall came to Keesler Air Force Base, formerly Keesler Field pre-January 1948, from Brookley Field at Mobile, Alabama where he was Deputy Commander of the 3380th Technical Training Wing.  In July 1950, Colonel J.P. Kirkendall was named acting base commander in the absence of Brigadier General James A. Powell (1893-1983) who was on a 10-day Air Force business trip and Kirkendall was named Deputy Commander at Keesler in September 1952.  He served as the interim Commandant of KAFB from August 1, 1953 to August 19, 1953 when General Powell retired from the USAF.(The Daily Herald, July 11, 1950, p. 1; The Gulf Coast Times, August 6, 1953, p. 1)

 

Family

Before 1940, John Phillips Kirkendall married Doris Weisenbach (1908-1993), a native of of Wellisville, Ohio.  She was the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. John Christian Weisenbach of Dayton, Ohio.  Their daughter, Jean Talmadge Kirkendall (b. 1946), was born at Macon, Georgia.

 

In June 1971, Jean Talmadge Kirkendahl, became the spouse of James Yerger Winkeljohn (b. 1945), the son of Walter Winkeljohn (1917-2014) and Marjorie Lopez Yerger (1921-2002).  The Winkeljohn family lived at 418 Martin Avenue in Ocean Springs.  Jean was educated at the Academy of the Sacred Heart at New Orleans and Maryville College of the Sacred Heart at St. Louis.  James Y. Winkeljohn was a Notre Dame High School graduate and completed his education at Mississippi State and the University of Tennessee.  He served in Vietnam as a lieutenant.  The Winkeljohns have longtime residents of Florida.(The Ocean Springs Record, May 6, 1971, p. 13)

 

Retirement

General Kirkendall retired from his military career on July 31, 1954.  A reception and celebration of his long and faithful service to his fellowman and country had taken place on July 14, 1954 at the Pastime Café.  The Biloxi Chamber of Commerce and City Commission of Biloxi sponsored the event.  Major General Harlan C. Parks was a guest.(The Daily Herald, June 29, 1954, p. 1)

 

Post-military career

In July 1957, Jack Kirkendall was named vice-president of the Texas Corporation and board member of its affiliate, the Washington Underwriters Inc., an investment firm specializing in mutual funds and income plans.   General Kirkendall joined many prominent military leaders on the company’s board: Major General Charles Lawrence; Lt. General Lutes; Lt. General Ira Baker; Admiral Gardner; Major General Moore; and Major General Kasten.  (The Ocean Springs News, July 18, 1957, p. 1)

____________________________________________________________________
Noreta Yerger
 
Noreta Yerger
 

 

 

Richard Yerger

 

____________________________________

Rowena Yerger

Rowena Yerger

 

________________________

Yerger Building [erected in 1926]

 

The Yerger Building, located on the north side of West Howard Avenue just east of Reynoir Street, was built for $100,000 in 1926.  It was the first structural steel frame building to be erected at Biloxi.  John A. Juliana (1895-1960), general contractor, came to Biloxi from New Orleans where his crew built the Buena Vista addition designed by Carl Mathes.  Mr. Juliani, a native of Alabama, had worked as a structural engineer for U.S. Steel in Birmingham, Alabama.  He was employed to build many edifices at New Orleans and the Soldiers and Sailors Memorial at Baton Rouge was a recent project.(The Daily Herald, August 28, 1926, p. 2 and April 21, 1938, p. 1)

 

Yerger Building Lost-1938 sale

In April 1938, the Avenue Realty Company, Inc. of Opelousas, Louisiana via Baltar & Sadler, thier local real estate managers, conveyed the Yerger Building to Edward Barq and his spouse.   At this time, the Yerger Building had the following tenants on the first floor: Ferson & Swan; grant's; Morrison's; Hill's; Palace Restaurant; Rosenblum's; Electrik Maid Bakery; John's barber Shop; and the Hamburger King.  Second floor occupants were: Dr. B.Z. Welch; Dr. D.L. Hollis; Dr. W.M. Bosworth; Dr. C.G. Jones; Dr. Presley Wwelwin; Louis Hengen, attorney; the B.C. Credit Union; and thomas J. Wiltz, attorney.(The Daily Herald, April 21, 1938, p. 1)

 

1320 West Beach Boulevard

Noreta Lopez Yerger came into possession of the domicile at 1320 West Beach Boulevard after the death of Erena A. Lopez, her older sister. 

 

Noreta conveyed 1320 West Beach to James Rucks Yerger, her son, in ?   he sold her this home back in September 1953.(Harrison Co., Mississippi Land Deed Bk. 255, p. 374 and Harrison Co., Mississippi Land Deed Bk. 381, p. 65)

 

In July 1957, Noreta Lopez Yerger conveyed 1320 West Beach for $60,000 to John B. Lopez (1915-1970), her nephew and son of Lazaro T. Lopez (1877-1918) and Eurilda Seal Lopez (1879-1966).(Harrison Co., Mississippi Land Deed Bk. 381, p. 65)

1320 West Beach left the Lopez family in

 

Sunkist Manor

In January 1966, Sherwood R. Bailey (1921-1989), Gulfport entrepreneur and president of Bailey Homes Inc., announced that he had acquired two parcels of land from the Yerger and Bohannon families in the Sunkist Country Club section north of Popp’s Ferry in the Biloxi School District.  Bailey planned a housing development on these tracts to be called Sunkist Manor.  He anticipated building over three hundred homes ranging in price from $17,000 to $29,000 with a total development cost of about $16 million.  The homes would be built of brick with three or four, large bedrooms and have two, tiled bathrooms, custom kitchens and modern appliances.(The Daily Herald, January 6, 1966, p. 1)

 

Demise

Noreta Lopez Yerger expired on September 13, 1960, at the home of Rowena Y. Baltar, her daughter, at Pascagoula, Mississippi.  He was survived by: James Rucks Yerger of Yazoo City, Mississippi; Mrs. Walter H. Winkeljohn of Ocean Springs, Mississippi; Mrs. H.L. Robinson in New Orleans; Robert M. Yerger at Elsmere, Delaware; Richard K. Yerger of Jackson, Mississippi; and Rowena Y. Baltar of Pascagoula.(The Daily Herald, September 14, 1960, p. 2)

 

 

REFERENCES:

Jerome Lepre, Catholic Church Records Diocese of Biloxi, Mississippi, Volume I, (Catholic Dioceses of Biloxi: Biloxi, Mississippi-1991).

Twentieth Century Coast Edition of the Biloxi Daily Herald: Historical and Biographical (George W. Wilkes & Sons: Biloxi-1902).

 

Chancery Court Cases

Harrison County, Mississippi Chancery Court Cause No. , “The Estate of Julia Dulion Lopez”-1918

Harrison County, Mississippi Chancery Court Cause No. 19034, “Noreta Lopez v. State of Mississippi”-September 1942

 

Journals

The Biloxi Daily Herald, “Biloxi High school defeats Gulfport”, November 28, 1908.

The Daily Herald, “Yerger-Lopez nuptials pretty”, January 26, 1917.

The Daily Herald, “Rucks Yerger building bungalow”, October 1, 1917.

The Daily Herald, “Yerger baby [James Rucks Yerger III] christened", November 27, 1917.

The Daily Herald, “Lopez home to be demolished”, January 22, 1920. 

The Daily Herald, “Biloxi home is being torn down”, June 10, 1920.

The Daily Herald, “Rucks Yerger to head Red Cross”, November 2, 1922.

The Daily Herald, “Juliani is erecting steel”, August 28, 1926.

The Daily Herald, “Will probably let contract for new [Saenger] theatre in June”, May 16, 1928.

The Daily Herald,“Rucks Yerger, Jr. funeral tomorrow”, January 29, 1931.

The Daily Herald, “Yerger Building purchased by Mr. and Mrs. Ed Barq”, April 21, 1938.

The Daily Herald, “86 graduates for Biloxi High”, May 23, 1939.

The Daily Herald, “Miss Yerger to be Carnival Queen”, June 29, 1939.
 
The Daily Herald, “Elks honor Air Corps officers”, July 24, 1941.
 
The Daily Herald, “Air school supply depot at Gulfport”, July 24, 1941.

The Daily Herald, “Announces engagement [Yerger-Baltar]”, August 10, 1953.

The Orlando Sentinel [Three Star Edition], 'Patrick M. Collins', September 26, 1993, p. B-4.

The Daily Herald, “Mrs. Rucks Yerger dies in Pascagoula”, September 14, 1960.

The Daily Herald, “Sherwood Bailey tells of $16 million building program”, January 6, 1966.

The Jackson County Times, “Local News Interests”,April 20, 1918, p. 5.

The Mobile Register, “Shrimp fleet in Biloxi blessed”, June 8, 1970, p. A-6.

The Ocean Springs Record, 'Miss Winkeljohn-Mr. Laird', April 18, 1974.

 The Sun Herald, “Rowena Yerger Baltar”, November 29, 2005. 

The Sun Herald, “Marjory Yerger Winkeljohn”, June 21, 2002, p. A-7.

The Sun Herald, “Walter H. Winkeljohn”, June 13, 2014, p. A-4.